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How Do The Kidneys Compensate For Metabolic Acidosis?

Renal Compensation

Renal Compensation

Chronic Carbon Dioxide Retainer Renal compensation of respiratory acidosis is by increased urinary excretion of hydrogen ions and resorption of HCO3−. This relatively slow process occurs over several days. Slowly, pH reaches low normal values, but HCO3− levels and BE are increased. This is the situation of the patient with chronic respiratory failure. Pulmonary patients usually have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or restrictive pulmonary disease, or they are morbidly obese. Increased Co2 stores are the rule, and the normal respiratory drive to Paco2 is obtunded. This group of patients is sensitive to O2 supplementation because respiratory drive is predominantly determined by hypoxemia. Patients with a Pao2 in the mid-50s and a Paco2 at the same level usually receive home O2 treatment, initially at night to reduce pulmonary hypertension and to relieve dyspnea. When the chronic Co2 retainer develops an acute respiratory problem and pH levels fall to less than 7.20, noninvasive ventilatory assistance is usually indicated. Fetoplacental Elimination of Metabolic Acid Load Fetal respiratory and renal compensation in response to changes in fetal pH is limited by the level of maturity and the surrounding maternal environment. However, although the placentomaternal unit performs most compensatory functions,3 the fetal kidneys have some, although limited, ability to contribute to the maintenance of fetal acid–base balance. The most frequent cause of fetal metabolic acidosis is fetal hypoxemia owing to abnormalities of uteroplacental function or blood flow (or both). Primary maternal hypoxemia or maternal metabolic acidosis secondary to maternal diabetes mellitus, sepsis, or renal tubular abnormalities is an unusual cause of fetal metabolic acidosis. Pregnant women, a Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metabolic Acidosis ). Lactic acidosis (due to physiologic processes) Lactic acidosis (due to exogenous toxins) Toluene (initially high gap; subsequent excretion of metabolites normalizes gap) HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors Biguanides (rare except with acute kidney injury) Normal anion gap (hyperchloremic acidosis) Renal tubular acidosis, types 1, 2, and 4 The most common causes of a high anion gap metabolic acidosis are Ketoacidosis is a common complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (see diabetic ketoacidosis ), but it also occurs with chronic alcoholism (see alcoholic ketoacidos Continue reading >>

Renal Regulation Of Metabolic Acidosis And Alkalosis

Renal Regulation Of Metabolic Acidosis And Alkalosis

1. 06/21/14 1 Normal Acid-Base Balance • Normal pH 7.35-7.45 • Narrow normal range • Compatible with life 6.8 - 8.0 ___/______/___/______/___ 6.8 7.35 7.45 8.0 Acid Alkaline 2. 06/21/14 2 PH Scale 3. 06/21/14 3 Acid & Base • Acid: • An acid is "when hydrogen ions accumulate in a solution" • It becomes more acidic • [H+] increases = more acidity • CO2 is an example of an acid. Base: A base is chemical that will remove hydrogen ions from the solution Bicarbonate is an example of a base. 4. 06/21/14 4 Acid and Base Containing Food: • To maintain health, the diet should consist of 60% alkaline forming foods and 40% acid forming foods. To restore health, the diet should consist of 80% alkaline forming foods and 20% acid forming foods. • Generally, alkaline forming foods include: most fruits, green vegetables, peas, beans, lentils, spices, herbs,seasonings,seeds and nuts. • Generally, acid forming foods include: meat, fish, poultry, eggs, grains, and legumes. 5. 06/21/14 5 Citric Acid And Lactic Acid Although both citric acid and lactic acid are acids BUT Citric acid leads to Alkalosis while Lactic acid to Acidosis due to metabolism 6. 06/21/14 6 Acidoses & Alkalosis • An abnormality in one or more of the pH control mechanisms can cause one of two major disturbances in Acid-BaseAcid-Base balance – AcidosisAcidosis – AlkalosisAlkalosis 7. 06/21/14 7 Acidosis • Acidosis is excessive blood acidity caused by an overabundance of acid in the blood or a loss of bicarbonate from the blood (metabolic acidosis), or by a buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood that results from poor lung function or slow breathing (respiratory acidosis). • Blood acidity increases when people ingest substances that contain or produce acid or when the lungs do not expel enou Continue reading >>

Response To Disturbances

Response To Disturbances

The body tries to minimize pH changes and responds to acid-base disturbances with body buffers, compensatory responses by the lungs and kidney (to metabolic and respiratory disturbances, respectively) and by the kidney correcting metabolic disturbances. Body buffers: There are intracellular and extracellular buffers for primary respiratory and metabolic acid-base disturbances. Intracellular buffers include hemoglobin in erythrocytes and phosphates in all cells. Extracellular buffers are carbonate (HCO3–) and non-carbonate (e.g. protein, bone) buffers. These immediately buffer the rise or fall in H+. Compensation: This involves responses by the respiratory tract and kidney to primary metabolic and respiratory acid-base disturbances, respectively. Compensation opposes the primary disturbance, although the laboratory changes in the compensatory response parallel those in the primary response. This concept is illustrated in the summary below. Respiratory compensation for a primary metabolic disturbance: Alterations in alveolar ventilation occurs in response to primary metabolic acid-base disturbances. This begins within minutes to hours of an acute primary metabolic disturbance. Note that complete compensation via this mechanism may take up to 24 hours. Renal compensation for a primary respiratory disturbance: Here, the kidney alters excretion of acid (which influences bases as well) in response to primary respiratory disturbances. This begins within hours of an acute respiratory disturbance, but take several days (3-5 days) to take full effect. Correction of acid-base changes: Correction of a primary respiratory acid-base abnormality usually requires medical or surgical intervention of the primary problem causing the acid-base disturbance, e.g. surgical relief of a colla Continue reading >>

Disorders Of Acid-base Balance

Disorders Of Acid-base Balance

Module 10: Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid-Base Balance By the end of this section, you will be able to: Identify the three blood variables considered when making a diagnosis of acidosis or alkalosis Identify the source of compensation for blood pH problems of a respiratory origin Identify the source of compensation for blood pH problems of a metabolic/renal origin Normal arterial blood pH is restricted to a very narrow range of 7.35 to 7.45. A person who has a blood pH below 7.35 is considered to be in acidosis (actually, physiological acidosis, because blood is not truly acidic until its pH drops below 7), and a continuous blood pH below 7.0 can be fatal. Acidosis has several symptoms, including headache and confusion, and the individual can become lethargic and easily fatigued. A person who has a blood pH above 7.45 is considered to be in alkalosis, and a pH above 7.8 is fatal. Some symptoms of alkalosis include cognitive impairment (which can progress to unconsciousness), tingling or numbness in the extremities, muscle twitching and spasm, and nausea and vomiting. Both acidosis and alkalosis can be caused by either metabolic or respiratory disorders. As discussed earlier in this chapter, the concentration of carbonic acid in the blood is dependent on the level of CO2 in the body and the amount of CO2 gas exhaled through the lungs. Thus, the respiratory contribution to acid-base balance is usually discussed in terms of CO2 (rather than of carbonic acid). Remember that a molecule of carbonic acid is lost for every molecule of CO2 exhaled, and a molecule of carbonic acid is formed for every molecule of CO2 retained. Figure 1. Symptoms of acidosis affect several organ systems. Both acidosis and alkalosis can be diagnosed using a blood test. Metabolic Acidosis: Primary Bic Continue reading >>

How Does The Renal System Compensate For Conditions Of Respiratory Alkalosis?

How Does The Renal System Compensate For Conditions Of Respiratory Alkalosis?

In order to function normally, your body needs a blood pH of between 7.35 and 7.45. Alkalosis is when you have too much base in your blood, causing your blood pH to rise above 7.45. The lungs and the kidneys are the two main organs involved in maintaining a normal blood pH. The lungs do this by blowing off carbon dioxide, since most of the acid in the body is carbonic acid, which is made from carbon dioxide during metabolic processes. The amount of carbon dioxide removed is controlled by your breathing rate. The kidneys maintain blood pH by controlling the amount of bicarbonate, which is a base that is excreted from the body. The kidneys also control the amount of acids excreted from the body. Respiratory alkalosis occurs when the lungs are blowing off more carbon dioxide than the body is producing. This usually occurs from hyperventilation. Your body's immediate response, after about 10 minutes of respiratory alkalosis, is a process called cell buffering. During cell buffering, hydrogen ions found in hemoglobin, proteins and phosphates, move out of the cells and into the extracellular fluid. There they combine with bicarbonate molecules and form carbonic acid. This process helps to reduce the amount of bicarbonate in the body and increase the amount of acid. However, while cell buffering occurs quickly, it does not have a huge effect on the body's pH. After about two to six hours of respiratory alkalosis the kidneys respond. They begin to limit the excretion of hydrogen and other acids and increase the excretion of bicarbonate. It usually takes the kidneys two or three days to reach a new steady state. In chronic respiratory alkalosis, the pH may constantly be high, but the body learns to adapt to it over time, with the help of the kidneys. Continue reading >>

Acid-base Balance

Acid-base Balance

Your blood needs the right balance of acidic and basic (alkaline) compounds to function properly. This is called the acid-base balance. Your kidneys and lungs work to maintain the acid-base balance. Even slight variations from the normal range can have significant effects on your vital organs. Acid and alkaline levels are measured on a pH scale. An increase in acidity causes pH levels to fall. An increase in alkaline causes pH levels to rise. When the levels of acid in your blood are too high, it’s called acidosis. When your blood is too alkaline, it is called alkalosis. Respiratory acidosis and alkalosis are due to a problem with the lungs. Metabolic acidosis and alkalosis are due to a problem with the kidneys. Each of these conditions is caused by an underlying disease or disorder. Treatment depends on the cause. When you breathe, your lungs remove excess carbon dioxide from your body. When they cannot do so, your blood and other fluids become too acidic. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Symptoms may include fatigue, shortness of breath, and confusion. Causes of respiratory acidosis There are several different causes of respiratory acidosis including: chest deformities or injuries chronic lung and airway diseases overuse of sedatives obesity Types of respiratory acidosis There are no noticeable symptoms of chronic respiratory acidosis. This is due to the fact that your blood slowly becomes acidic and your kidneys adjust to compensate, returning your blood to a normal pH balance. Acute respiratory acidosis comes on suddenly, leaving the kidneys no time to adjust. Those with chronic respiratory acidosis may experience acute respiratory acidosis due to another illness that causes the condition to worsen. Diagnosis of respiratory acidosis A complete physical examination Continue reading >>

Renal Physiology Acid-base Balance

Renal Physiology Acid-base Balance

Sort Your patient's blood pH is too low (acidosis), caused by metabolic acidosis. After examining the patient, you find that the urine bicarbonate levels are too low (H+ is being reabsorbed) and blood carbon dioxide levels are too high (too much blood acid); What does this mean? Based on the patient's pCO2 levels are they compensating or not? This means that the original problem of a low bicarbonate level needs to be compensated for by the lungs, which need to hyperventilate, expelling more CO2 (an acid). Since this patient's pCO2 levels are also high (not expelling enough acid), they are NOT compensating. Patient's blood pH is too high (alkalosis). This can be caused by either respiratory or metabolic alkalosis. Let's say it is metabolic alkalosis. What do you need to check to see if patient is compensating? If bicarbonate levels are high (too much base) and blood CO2 levels are high (too much acid), what do the lungs need to do to compensate? What does the patient's elevated Pco2 levels tell you? Patients partial pressure of Carbon dioxide and bicarbonate Take shallower breaths to prevent loss of acid Patient is compensating Patient's blood pH is too high (alkalosis). This can be caused by either respiratory or metabolic alkalosis. Let's say it is metabolic alkalosis. What do you need to check to see if patient is compensating? If bicarbonate levels are high (too much base) and blood CO2 levels are low (too little acid), what do the lungs need to do to compensate? Since the patient's pCO2 level is low, this tells you what? Patients pCO2 and bicarbonate Take shallower breaths to prevent loss of acid Not compensating Continue reading >>

Acid-base Disorders Flashcards | Quizlet

Acid-base Disorders Flashcards | Quizlet

-accomplished by substances in blood buffering the pH (soaking up H+) *bicarbonate (5%, but most physiologically important) what are two ways to get acid out of the body? -pee it out through renal excretion as H+ *diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis (Increased AG) *diarrhea, renal failure (no change in AG( how does the body compensate for metabolic acidosis? *lungs compensate by increasing respiration (blowing off CO2) *kidneys compensate by excreting more H+ (minimal effect compared to the lungs) -the total concentration of positive molecules (Na+, K+) minus the total concentration of negative molecules (CL-, HCO3-) -many normal minor negative molecules are not counted, which collectively add up -many abnormal molecules have a negative charge (lactic acid, ketones), so there are more positive charges in the calculation and the anion gap increases how does the body compensate for respiratory alkalosis? -kidneys excrete HCO3- and decrease H+ excretion -compensatory abilities of the lung are 100 times greater than the kidney -compensation by both lungs and kidneys takes a while to kick in -in acute stages, you will see relatively large abnormalities of pH -as compensation occurs the pH will return closer to normal, but other values will be abnormal still until the underlying problem is fixed what condition does this describe: decreased pH and increased pCO2 what condition does this describe: decreased pH and decreased pCO2 what condition does this describe: increased pH and decreased pCO2 what condition does this describe: increased pH and increased pCO2 what happens to pH, pCO2 and pO2 at high altitude? -oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, methemoglobin -when there is acidosis, increased amounts of extracellular H+ diffuses into the cells and K+ ions c Continue reading >>

5.5 Metabolic Acidosis - Compensation

5.5 Metabolic Acidosis - Compensation

Acid-Base Physiology 5.5.1 Hyperventilation Compensation for a metabolic acidosis is hyperventilation to decrease the arterial pCO2. This hyperventilation was first described by Kussmaul in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in 1874. The metabolic acidosis is detected by both the peripheral and central chemoreceptors and the respiratory center is stimulated. The initial stimulation of the central chemoreceptors is due to small increases in brain ISF [H+]. The subsequent increase in ventilation causes a fall in arterial pCO2 which inhibits the ventilatory response. Maximal compensation takes 12 to 24 hours The chemoreceptor inhibition acts to limit and delay the full ventilatory response until bicarbonate shifts have stabilised across the blood brain barrier. The increase in ventilation usually starts within minutes and is usually well advanced at 2 hours of onset but maximal compensation may take 12 to 24 hours to develop. This is �maximal� compensation rather than �full� compensation as it does not return the extracellular pH to normal. In situations where a metabolic acidosis develops rapidly and is short-lived there is usually little time for much compensatory ventilatory response to occur. An example is the acute and sometimes severe lactic acidosis due to a prolonged generalised convulsion: this corrects due to rapid hepatic uptake and metabolism of the lactate following cessation of convulsive muscular activity, and hyperventilation due to the acidosis does not occur. The expected pCO2 at maximal compensation can be calculated from a simple formula The arterial pCO2 at maximal compensation has been measured in many patients with a metabolic acidosis. A consistent relationship between bicarbonate level and pCO2 has been found. It can be estimated from the Continue reading >>

Acidosis And Alkolosis

Acidosis And Alkolosis

The normal pH value for the body fluids is between pH 7.35 and 7.45. When the pH value of body fluids is below 7.35, the condition is called acidosis, and when the pH is above 7.45, it is called alkalosis. Metabolism produces acidic products that lower the pH of the body fluids. For example, carbon dioxide is a by-product of metabolism, and carbon dioxide combines with water to form carbonic acid. Also, lactic acid is a product of anaerobic metabolism, protein metabolism produces phosphoric and sulfuric acids, and lipid metabolism produces fatty acids. These acidic substances must continuously be eliminated from the body to maintain pH homeostasis. Rapid elimination of acidic products of metabolism results in alkalosis, and the failure to eliminate acidic products of metabolism results in acidosis. The major effect of acidosis is depression of the central nervous system. When the pH of the blood falls below 7.35, the central nervous system malfunctions, and the individual becomes disoriented and possibly comatose as the condition worsens. A major effect of alkalosis is hyperexcitability of the nervous system. Peripheral nerves are affected first, resulting in spontaneous nervous stimulation of muscles. Spasms and tetanic contractions and possibly extreme nervousness or convulsions result. Severe alkalosis can cause death as a result of tetany of the respiratory muscles. Although buffers in the body fluids help resist changes in the pH of body fluids, the respiratory system and the kidneys regulate the pH of the body fluids. Malfunctions of either the respiratory system or the kidneys can result in acidosis or alkalosis. Acidosis and alkalosis are categorized by the cause of the condition. Respiratory acidosis or respiratory alkalosis results from abnormalities of the r Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [ 1 ] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis , Metabolic Acidosis , and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis .) Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (ie, >45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (ie, pH < 7.35). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate levels (ie, >30 mEq/L). Acute respiratory acidosis is present when an abrupt failure of ventilation occurs. This failure in ventilation may result from depression of the central respiratory center by one or another of the following: Central nervous system disease or drug-induced r Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis is a condition that occurs when the body produces excessive quantities of acid or when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. If unchecked, metabolic acidosis leads to acidemia, i.e., blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of hydrogen ions by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3−) in the kidney. Its causes are diverse, and its consequences can be serious, including coma and death. Together with respiratory acidosis, it is one of the two general causes of acidemia. Terminology : Acidosis refers to a process that causes a low pH in blood and tissues. Acidemia refers specifically to a low pH in the blood. In most cases, acidosis occurs first for reasons explained below. Free hydrogen ions then diffuse into the blood, lowering the pH. Arterial blood gas analysis detects acidemia (pH lower than 7.35). When acidemia is present, acidosis is presumed. Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms are not specific, and diagnosis can be difficult unless the patient presents with clear indications for arterial blood gas sampling. Symptoms may include chest pain, palpitations, headache, altered mental status such as severe anxiety due to hypoxia, decreased visual acuity, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, altered appetite and weight gain, muscle weakness, bone pain, and joint pain. Those in metabolic acidosis may exhibit deep, rapid breathing called Kussmaul respirations which is classically associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Rapid deep breaths increase the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled, thus lowering the serum carbon dioxide levels, resulting in some degree of compensation. Overcompensation via respiratory alkalosis to form an alkalemia does not occur. Extreme acidemia leads to neurological and cardia Continue reading >>

Intro To Arterial Blood Gases, Part 2

Intro To Arterial Blood Gases, Part 2

Arterial Blood Gas Analysis, Part 2 Introduction Acute vs. Chronic Respiratory Disturbances Primary Metabolic Disturbances Anion Gap Mixed Disorders Compensatory Mechanisms Steps in ABG Analysis, Part II Summary Compensatory Mechanisms Compensation refers to the body's natural mechanisms of counteracting a primary acid-base disorder in an attempt to maintain homeostasis. As you learned in Acute vs. Chronic Respiratory Disturbances, the kidneys can compensate for chronic respiratory disorders by either holding on to or dumping bicarbonate. With Chronic respiratory acidosis: Chronic respiratory alkalosis: the kidneys hold on to bicarbonate the kidneys dump bicarbonate With primary metabolic disturbances, the respiratory system compensates for the acid-base disorder. The lungs can either blow off excess acid (via CO2) to compensate for metabolic acidosis, or to a lesser extent, hold on to acid (via CO2) to compensate for metabolic alkalosis. With Metabolic acidosis: Metabolic alkalosis: ventilation increases to blow off CO2 ventilation decreases to hold on to CO2 The body's response to metabolic acidosis is predictable. With metabolic acidosis, respiration will increase to blow off CO2, thereby decreasing the amount of acid in the blood. Recall that with metabolic acidosis, central chemoreceptors are triggered by the low pH and increase the drive to breathe. For now, it is only important to learn (qualitatively) that there is a predictable compensatory response to metabolic acidosis. Later, during your 3rd or 4th year rotations, you might learn how to (quantitatively) determine if the compensatory response to metabolic acidosis is appropriate by using the Winter's Formula. The body's response to metabolic alkalosis is not as complete. This is because we would need to hypov Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis: Practice Essentials, Background, Etiology

Metabolic Acidosis: Practice Essentials, Background, Etiology

Metabolic acidosis is a clinical disturbance characterized by an increase in plasma acidity. Metabolic acidosis should be considered a sign of an underlying disease process. Identification of this underlying condition is essential to initiate appropriate therapy. (See Etiology, DDx, Workup, and Treatment.) Understanding the regulation of acid-base balance requires appreciation of the fundamental definitions and principles underlying this complex physiologic process. Go to Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis and Emergent Management of Metabolic Acidosis for complete information on those topics. An acid is a substance that can donate hydrogen ions (H+). A base is a substance that can accept H+ ions. The ion exchange occurs regardless of the substance's charge. Strong acids are those that are completely ionized in body fluids, and weak acids are those that are incompletely ionized in body fluids. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) is considered a strong acid because it is present only in a completely ionized form in the body, whereas carbonic acid (H2 CO3) is a weak acid because it is ionized incompletely, and, at equilibrium, all three reactants are present in body fluids. See the reactions below. The law of mass action states that the velocity of a reaction is proportional to the product of the reactant concentrations. On the basis of this law, the addition of H+ or bicarbonate (HCO3-) drives the reaction shown below to the left. In body fluids, the concentration of hydrogen ions ([H+]) is maintained within very narrow limits, with the normal physiologic concentration being 40 nEq/L. The concentration of HCO3- (24 mEq/L) is 600,000 times that of [H+]. The tight regulation of [H+] at this low concentration is crucial for normal cellular activities because H+ at higher concentrations can b Continue reading >>

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