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How Do Ketones Work

Ask The Supplement Expert: Will Ketones Help Me Burn Fat?

Ask The Supplement Expert: Will Ketones Help Me Burn Fat?

Q: Will taking ketone supplements, while eating a normal diet, provide the same fat-loss benefits as being on a seriously carb-restricted, or ketogenic diet? The very short answer to your question is "probably not," but given how complex the burgeoning field of study into nutritional ketosis is, that simple answer requires a bit of unpacking. The basic thinking when it comes to supplementing with ketones and their effect on fat loss is this: When your body is consistently carb-depleted, it produces ketones as a mechanism to utilize fat (and to a lesser extent, amino acids from muscle) as fuel. These ketones can also be used as an alternative to glucose as fuel to support your brain, muscles, heart, and other organs. Once you have a high enough presence of ketones in the blood, usually around 0.5 to 3.0 mM per deciliter of blood (as can be measured with urinalysis ketone strips), you have entered what is known as "nutritional ketosis." To be clear, your body is what is producing those ketones, though. Ketone supplement advocates extend that line of thinking beyond the ketones your body is manufacturing on its own. Their case is that if consuming a ketone supplement raises your blood ketone level to the point where you are technically in ketosis, then you must be burning fat with the same effectiveness if you came by your ketosis the old-fashioned way. Unfortunately, the scant scientific evidence that currently exists doesn't support connecting the dots this way. Researchers out of the University of Sao Paulo, in Brazil, recently gave a group of rats substantial doses of beta hydroxybutyrate (exogenous ketones) both acutely and for four weeks.[1] Not surprisingly, the researchers concluded that consuming oral ketones increased circulating ketones (ketonemia). To which I s Continue reading >>

Ketones 101: Exploring The Benefits Of Exogenous Ketone Use

Ketones 101: Exploring The Benefits Of Exogenous Ketone Use

Walk into any supplement store and you’ll see the shelves adorned with what seems like an endless number of products making too-good-to-be-true claims: Lose weight in 24 hours! Lose two inches in two weeks! Between excessive praise and pushy salespeople, it can be difficult to know which supplements are reasonably worth trying—and why. So, when exogenous ketone supplements started showing up on the market, we were honestly a bit skeptical: Are these new supplements worth incorporating into our regimens, and are their apparent benefits backed up by actual scientific research? Today’s post is dedicated to explaining how we came to conclude that yes, exogenous supplements are worth including into your daily routine, and we’re about to tell you why. What are Exogenous Ketones? Simply put, the term “exogenous” refers to things that come from outside the body. Supplements are therefore considered exogenous because you ingest them rather than producing the contents of that supplement inside the body. The opposite of exogenous is “endogenous,” which refers to things that you do produce within your body. To define what “ketones” are, we need to briefly talk about how our metabolism works. Whenever you eat carbohydrates, they’re broken down into glucose (or sugar), which provides your body with the energy it needs to function; however, when you utilize a low-carb diet and don’t have enough glucose, your body adapts by looking for other sources of energy in the body. Eventually, it will turn to your fat cells. Whenever fats are broken down for energy, ketone bodies are produced as a result. Glucose is no longer your body’s primary fuel source, ketones are. (It’s important to note that ketones are always present in the blood, but their levels increase du Continue reading >>

Raspberry Ketones And Weight Loss Review Of Research (updated 2017)

Raspberry Ketones And Weight Loss Review Of Research (updated 2017)

What are raspberry ketones and do they work? Well, if you watch the Dr. Oz Show, you may have heard Dr. Oz call raspberry ketones “The #1 miracle in a bottle to burn your fat.” Since he made that bold statement, I've heard that raspberry ketone supplements are sold so fast that vitamin stores can't keep them on the shelves! So, what I'd like to do is by review the raspberry ketone research — minus the hype that you have already heard about. Only in this way can you make an informed decision about whether raspberry ketone are right for you. Other names for this supplement include red raspberry ketone, and European red raspberry, as well as the more scientific names Rubus idaeus, Rubus strigosus and Framboise Rouge. I'm telling you these other names because if you just searched for “raspberry ketone” you may not find all of the information available. For this review, I'm pretty much going to stick to just calling it raspberry ketone. What Are Raspberry Ketones? Red raspberry ketones are one of many compounds in raspberries and are what gives raspberries their unique smell. Like all things that come from fruits and vegetables, raspberries contain a lot of substances that are healthy —including anthocyanins, vitamin C and beta carotene. As such, raspberry ketones are also antioxidants. Raspberry ketones also “look” similar to synephrine and capsicum — two ingredients that have been used in many weight loss supplements over the years such as the fat burner promoted by Jillian Michaels. This similarity is likely why scientists considered raspberry ketones as a weight loss agent itself. Weight loss supplements that contain raspberry ketones include QuickTrim — the Kim Kardashian supplement —and Apidexin. See my reviews on those products for more informati Continue reading >>

What They Don’t Want You To Know About Raspberry Ketones

What They Don’t Want You To Know About Raspberry Ketones

Before you jump on the raspberry ketone bandwagon, there are a few things you should know about this over-priced, proclaimed weight-loss miracle in a bottle. What is it? Raspberry ketone is the natural phenolic compound found in red raspberries (Rubus idaeus). In simple terms, this chemical compound gives berries their signature scent. Until recently, raspberry ketones were used primarily by the perfume and manufactured food industries, but now the compound is being sold in supplement form. Raspberry ketones have been touted as the next weight-loss miracle drug, with manufacturers claiming that the ketones help your body break down fat more efficiently, helping you to lose more weight. Is it true? Before you run to the pharmacy to pick up a bottle, at least finish reading this blog. What I’m about to share with you might surprise (or downright shock) you! Raspberry ketones have never been tested on humans in scientific studies. That’s right. You read that correctly. To date, there have been no human studies showing that raspberry ketones burn fat or benefit your weight loss. Now, if you are a rat, there are two studies of interest. One study gave male rats raspberry ketones, which resulted in an increased secretion of adiponectin, a hormone secreted by fat cells that helps the body break down fat. The result was less fat on the rat. In another rat study, the rodents were fed a high-fat diet with differing amounts of raspberry ketones. The rats that received more raspberry ketones burned more body fat and gained less fat tissue. A third study exposed fat cells in a test tube to raspberry ketones and found that the raspberry ketones stimulated the breakdown of the fat cells. I’ll agree that this is all very interesting research, but it is also considered very prelim Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones

Last year I wrote a couple of posts on the nuances and complexities of ketosis, with an emphasis on nutritional ketosis (but some discussion of other states of ketosis—starvation ketosis and diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA). To understand this post, you’ll want to at least be familiar with the ideas in those posts, which can be found here and here. In the second of these posts I discuss the Delta G implications of the body using ketones (specifically, beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and acetoacetate, or AcAc) for ATP generation, instead of glucose and free fatty acid (FFA). At the time I wrote that post I was particularly (read: personally) interested in the Delta G arbitrage. Stated simply, per unit of carbon, utilization of BHB offers more ATP for the same amount of oxygen consumption (as corollary, generation of the same amount of ATP requires less oxygen consumption, when compared to glucose or FFA). I also concluded that post by discussing the possibility of testing this (theoretical) idea in a real person, with the help of exogenous (i.e., synthetic) ketones. I have seen this effect in (unpublished) data in world class athletes not on a ketogenic diet who have supplemented with exogenous ketones (more on that, below). Case after case showed a small, but significant increase in sub-threshold performance (as an example, efforts longer than about 4 minutes all-out). So I decided to find out for myself if ketones could, indeed, offer up the same amount of usable energy with less oxygen consumption. Some housekeeping issues before getting into it. This is a self-experiment, not real “data”—“N of 1” stuff is suggestive, but it prevents the use of nifty little things likes error bars and p-values. Please don’t over interpret these results. My reason for shari Continue reading >>

Instaketones Review: How Safe And Effective Is This Product?

Instaketones Review: How Safe And Effective Is This Product?

Instaketones Overview The InstaKetones is a weight loss* formula designed to boost* your metabolism and cut down excess fat. The supplement formula is a combination of Paleo and Keteo Diet. The supplement will is to help you lose* fat and grow into a lean body with possibly a slimmer waist and flat tummy. What InstaKetones does is take your body into ketosis whereby your body is dedicated towards use of ketones as a source of energy and it greatly discourages immense consumption of food and frequent carbs cravings. Your body is put in a constant balance of calories. With InstaKetones there is also a concentration on increasing* your metabolism levels to increase* the burning of the stored fats. The Instaketones comes in different flavors. Each packet weighs 11.7g of BHB per serving and a total serving per packet is equal to 30 servings. Each packet goes for the price of $69.99. Manufacturer Information and Claims about InstaKetones The InstaKetones is a product manufacture of the Julian Bakery. The manufacturer claims that the product is both Paleo and Keteo friendly. They put claim that their product does not contain any; animal byproducts, gluten, artificial colors or flavorings and there are whatsoever any preservatives found in their product. Working Process and the Ingredients List The InstaKetones actually puts your body in a metabolic state whereby it increases* the quantity of ketones in the blood to a level higher than the usual. When this happens the body is said to be in a ketogenic state where there is a reliable compact metabolism of lipid energy and the body is now able to breakdown fats in the body. The broken down fats are converted into useful energy used to fuel daily body functions. The placing of the body in Ketosis also makes the body not require to Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

My Big, Fat, N=1 Exogenous Ketones Supplementation Experiment (while Eating A Keto Diet)

My Big, Fat, N=1 Exogenous Ketones Supplementation Experiment (while Eating A Keto Diet)

My Big, Fat, n=1 Exogenous Ketones Supplementation Experiment (while Eating a Keto Diet) Here we go. I’ve been slightly apprehensive about sharing this latest experiment with you, because up until recently I was where I’m sure many of you are right now in my belief that exogenous ketones were a mother flippin’ ripoff. After all, all good keto kids know that ketone bodies are the RESULT of putting our bodies successfully in ketosis, so why in the hell would we want to pay to put ketones from outside ourselves into our system? Well, I got my reasons, which I’ll share with you in a bit. First, my purpose: to do an n=1 experiment in order to see if using exogenous ketones can help me lose weight while on a ketogenic diet — that is, a diet that already puts my body in ketosis. ***HUGE DISCLAIMER: I used my own hard-earned money to pay for the exogenous ketones. I was not approached by any company, and I am not doing this experiment on behalf of anybody but myself.*** Now for some background info on me: I’ve been following a keto diet for 20 months now I am approximately 75lbs overweight Aside from an initial fluid loss of 10lb, I have never lost any weight on keto Over these last 20 months I have experimented with altering my macros, intermittent fasting (IF), extended fasting, egg fasting, and meat fasting, and nothing to date has had any measurable, lasting impact on my weight I have PCOS I have low cortisol levels due to chronic Lyme disease that was finally treated in December 2016 and January 2017 I still do consider keto to be a success for me! I used it along with the protocol in the book The Mood Cure to finally get off antidepressants and anti-anxiety medication that I was previously unsuccessful in transitioning off of for 10 years (Note: Don’t ever a Continue reading >>

(diet Review) Pruvit Keto/os Exogenous Ketones: Ketosis Or Not?

(diet Review) Pruvit Keto/os Exogenous Ketones: Ketosis Or Not?

I’ve gotten a crazy number of requests do this Pruvit Keto/OS review. Keto/OS is a new exogenous ketone supplement that people are using to lose weight, among other things. I found very little in terms of research on exogenous ketones in humans. Exogenous ketones have been studied a bit in rats, and no one has studied them in terms of weight loss in people or in rodents. The product Keto/OS has no research behind it either, so I decided to bite the bullet and put myself on it for a week to see what would happen. I hate using small studies as proof for anything, but in this case, I had no choice. It was totally an n=1. I also hate drinking disgusting things, but again, in this case I had no choice. Sigh. Before I talk about how that all went, let’s chat about ketones and how they work in your body. What are ketones? Ketones are the byproduct of fat metabolism. When you deprive your body of it’s favorite source of energy – glucose – it starts burning your fat for fuel. That’s the premise of the ketogenic diet: burn fat, use the ketones that result as energy. Staying on the ketogenic diet is tough for most people, but it can be done, and for most healthy people, it’s probably not harmful. Check with your doctor or dietitian before starting any diet. Read my ketogenic diet review here. The issue with ketosis for weight loss is that when you break ketosis, the weight will probably come back on. If you’re a person who lives to eat and not eats to live, it might not be the best weight-loss option for you. Because a ketogenic diet is so difficult for most people to maintain, Pruvit is marketing Keto/OS by saying that you can eat a normal diet, drink Keto/OS, still go into ketosis, and lose weight when your body burns fat for energy from being in ‘ketosis’ fr Continue reading >>

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

The Truth About Exogenous Ketones Ketones are all the rage among low carbers. And like most things in nutrition and performance, we've found a way to get them in supplement form so we don't have to do any actual work. What are ketones? They're a byproduct of ketosis caused by the process of converting fat to fuel. Your body makes them when it's in a calorie or carb restricted state. What do they do? The body and brain can use them as fuel without the presence of glucose in the blood. And now, you can take ketone supplements (salts and esters), known as exogenous ketones, without actually restricting anything. According to those promoting this nasty-tasting supplement, that means you can have a brain and body fuelled by ketones, along with all of the supposed health benefits that come with running on fat. Well, don't fall for it. Exogenous Ketones = Endogenous Fat Storage? The problem with ketone supplementation (EXOgenous) is that it's not even close to the same thing as being in ketosis (ENDOgenous ketone production). And just like the butter-blended-into-coffee trend, it's a farce. Ketones may be depressing dieters' hunger and giving them a hit of energy and cognitive enhancement, but it's INHIBITING their ability to burn fat, providing zero nourishment, and doing nothing for their metabolic health. There's an assortment of evidence suggesting that it's probably making things worse. Think of exogenous ketones kind of like alcohol. When they're consumed, everything is stored and nothing else is burned. So any lipolysis (fat burning) that would be taking place is halted; any glucose and fatty acids in your blood that were circulating are stored; and the ingested ketones are burned until there aren't any left. More importantly, this clearance of alternative fuels (glucos Continue reading >>

Will Taking Exogenous Ketones Stop Fat Loss?

Will Taking Exogenous Ketones Stop Fat Loss?

Would you like to lose some fat? A ketogenic diet is a pretty good tool to help you reach your goal. You can use exogenous ketones which have been a popular way to help get people into ketosis and comply with the transition from eating carbs to eating fats. Once in ketosis, use real food to stay there. Sounds easy, right? Unfortunately, some bro science complicating this topic has been surfacing which must be quashed. People are claiming that exogenous ketones are stopping the fat burning that people are seeking. The same exogenous ketones that help a lot of people experience ketosis and make getting into and staying in ketosis much easier, which makes the fat loss so much easier. SAD! This is how the logic follows from people who don’t really understand physics but like to quote laws of physics to sound fancy like they know how the human body works: Exogenous ketones contain energy. Body fat is stored energy. Therefore, if you consume any energy, you can’t use any stored energy. That’s not really how the body works. At all. By that same rationale, if you were to eat any dietary fat (or any food), then you wouldn’t be able to burn any fat. Unless every single person who has ever lost fat has only done so by doing a water fast, I think this argument and concern is pretty invalid. So before we get further: NO, exogenous ketones do not stop fat burning. Fat loss and fat gain are a little more complicated than people think. I personally don’t believe in the strict calorie in, calorie out model that some people who misunderstand conservation of energy do. Your body is not a bomb calorimeter, so stop telling me that you need to intake a deficit of x amount of calories for y amount of fat loss, people who clearly don’t understand physics (or the human endocrine sys Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take For A Herniated Cervical Disc To Heal, So You Can Begin Running Again?

How Long Does It Take For A Herniated Cervical Disc To Heal, So You Can Begin Running Again?

Truth be told, a heniated cervical disc really doesn't heal in the sense that most people think. Once a disc is herniated, that's the way it remains. That being said, the SYMPTOMS from a herniated disc, such as pain, numbeness or tingling, may improve with time. There are several factors which will determine if symptoms will resolve with time: Degree/severity of herniation, morphology of herniation (meaning wether it's centralized or lateral) and if it is impinging upon the Neural elements. More times than not, disc herniations cause an inflammatory reaction around the nerve roots as they exit the spine, which causes the symptoms to wax and wane in thier severity. Most symptoms, improve with time because the inflammatory process dies down, therefore the irritation of the nerve root ceases, and the symptoms improve. On ocasion, the Disc herniation may shrink, or "scar down", which may have the added benefit of decreasing the irritation to the nerve root. SO....again, this is not a straight forward question. If, you do suspect you have a cervical disc herniation, it would be highly recommended to see your PCP to evaluate the severity of the herniation. Continue reading >>

Your Brain On Ketones

Your Brain On Ketones

The modern prescription of high carbohydrate, low fat diets and eating snacks between meals has coincided with an increase in obesity, diabetes, and and increase in the incidence of many mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. In addition, many of these disorders are striking the population at younger ages. While most people would agree that diet has a lot to do with the development of obesity and diabetes, many would disagree that what we eat has much to do with our mental health and outlook. I believe that what we eat has a lot to do with the health of our brains, though of course mental illness (like physical illness) has multifactorial causes, and by no means should we diminish the importance of addressing all the causes in each individual. But let's examine the opposite of the modern high carbohydrate, low fat, constant snacking lifestyle and how that might affect the brain. The opposite of a low fat, snacking lifestyle would be the lifestyle our ancestors lived for tens of thousands of generations, the lifestyle for which our brains are primarily evolved. It seems reasonable that we would have had extended periods without food, either because there was none available, or we were busy doing something else. Then we would follow that period with a filling meal of gathered plant and animal products, preferentially selecting the fat. During the day we might have eaten a piece of fruit, or greens, or a grub we dug up, but anything filling or high in calories (such as a starchy tuber) would have to be killed, butchered, and/or carefully prepared before eating. Fortunately, we have a terrific system of fuel for periods of fasting or low carbohydrate eating, our body (and brain) can readily shift from burning glucose to burning what ar Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

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