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How Do Ketones Work

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Generally, ketone concentrations are lower in the morning and higher in the evening. Whatever time you pick to measure ketone levels, make sure to keep it consistent. Also, do not measure your ketone levels right after exercise. Ketone levels tend to be lower while your glucose levels higher so you won't get representative numbers. Keep in mind there are daily fluctuations caused by changes in hormone levels. Don't get discouraged! Another aspect that affects the level of ketones is the amount of fat in your diet. Some of you may show higher concentration of ketones after a high-fat meal. Coconut oil contains MCTs that will help you boost ketones. To easily increase your fat intake on a ketogenic diet, try fat bombs - snacks with at least 80% fat content. Ketone levels tend to be higher after extensive aerobic exercise as your body depletes glycogen stores. Exercise may help you get into ketosis faster. ketogenic "fruity" breath is not pleasant for most people. To avoid this, drink a lot of water, mint tea and make sure you eat foods rich in electrolytes. Avoid too many chewing gums and mints, as it may put you out of ketosis; there may be hidden carbs affecting your blood sugar. Increase your electrolyte intake, especially potassium. You are likely going to lose some sodium and potassium when switching to the keto diet. Finally, if you find it hard to lose weight on a ketogenic diet, there may be plenty other reasons than the level of ketone bodies: Not Losing Weight on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up and Read Further. Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones

Last year I wrote a couple of posts on the nuances and complexities of ketosis, with an emphasis on nutritional ketosis (but some discussion of other states of ketosis—starvation ketosis and diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA). To understand this post, you’ll want to at least be familiar with the ideas in those posts, which can be found here and here. In the second of these posts I discuss the Delta G implications of the body using ketones (specifically, beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and acetoacetate, or AcAc) for ATP generation, instead of glucose and free fatty acid (FFA). At the time I wrote that post I was particularly (read: personally) interested in the Delta G arbitrage. Stated simply, per unit of carbon, utilization of BHB offers more ATP for the same amount of oxygen consumption (as corollary, generation of the same amount of ATP requires less oxygen consumption, when compared to glucose or FFA). I also concluded that post by discussing the possibility of testing this (theoretical) idea in a real person, with the help of exogenous (i.e., synthetic) ketones. I have seen this effect in (unpublished) data in world class athletes not on a ketogenic diet who have supplemented with exogenous ketones (more on that, below). Case after case showed a small, but significant increase in sub-threshold performance (as an example, efforts longer than about 4 minutes all-out). So I decided to find out for myself if ketones could, indeed, offer up the same amount of usable energy with less oxygen consumption. Some housekeeping issues before getting into it. This is a self-experiment, not real “data”—“N of 1” stuff is suggestive, but it prevents the use of nifty little things likes error bars and p-values. Please don’t over interpret these results. My reason for shari Continue reading >>

How To Use Exogenous Ketones

How To Use Exogenous Ketones

Exogenous Ketones were introduced in 2014, about the same time as I was recovering from having my daughter, and therefore very concerned about weight loss. But let’s back up for a bit, because if you’re here reading about Exogenous Ketones, and how to drink ketones for weight loss, let’s start at the beginning so you have a firm foundation to build if you do decided to take a ketone supplement for weight loss. First of all, Exogenous Ketones (we’ll get to exactly what those are in just a sec…hang in there) were introduced as the Ketogenic Diet started gaining popularity among the health and fitness community, as well as with the scientific community. Why? Well, it’s all about health. For so long, doctors and researchers have preached the benefits of a low-fat diet to prevent and correct all sort of things like heart disease, high cholesterol, obesity, etc. But….they may have been wrong. I am not a doctor, and do not have a medical degree, but I’ve done my homework, and I’ve lived (and am currently living) a ketogenic lifestyle. So I’ve done this, I’ve read loads and loads about it, and I’ve even been able to help many of my friends use the things I’ve learned to lead healthier lives. But, as with anything concerning your health, please make sure you have a discussion with your doctor before making a drastic change. Related: I lost 23 pounds in 60 days of Keto. Here’s how. Ok, legal stuff over, here’s what a Ketogenic Diet is: A Ketogenic Diet, also know as the Keto Diet, is a very high fat, very low carb, moderate protein diet that is very popular because it can cause you to lose body fat very fast, and study after study after study has linked Keto with benefits against cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more. Eating Ketogenical Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones: What They Are, Benefits Of Use And How They Work

Exogenous Ketones: What They Are, Benefits Of Use And How They Work

Exogenous ketones have become a popular nutritional supplement since their introduction in 2014. Like with any new supplement, though, there tends to be a lot of misinformation that you have to sift your way through to find the reliable data. So, this article does the hard work for you and gets right to what the true benefits and drawbacks of exogenous ketones are. We also cover what forms of ketones to consider, how they function in the body, and their role in future research. What Are Ketones? Our bodies use ketones via our mitochondria to generate energy. They are an alternative fuel source to glucose. Ketones are simple compounds because of their small molecular structure and weight. Specifically, they are organic (carbon-based) compounds that contain a central carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and two carbon-containing substituents, denoted by “R” (see chemical structure below). In humans, there are 3 different ketones produced by the mitochondria of the liver. These are also often referred to as ketone bodies. The three ketones are: Acetone Acetoacetic Acid Beta-Hydroxybutyric Acid (also known Beta Hydroxybuyrate or BHB). Other chemical names include 3-hydroxybutyric acid or 3-hydroxybutyrate. BHB is not technically a ketone since it contains a reactive OH-group in place of where a double-bonded oxygen normally would be as you can see in the diagram below. Yet, BHB still functions like a ketone in the body and converts into energy much like acetoacetate and acetone. This happens via the acetoacetate and acetyl-CoA pathway. Note that acetone conversion to acetyl-CoA is not efficient due to the need to convert acetone to acetoacetate via decarboxylation. However, BHB still functions like a ketone in the body and can be converted to energy (via acetoace Continue reading >>

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Great article. You actually answered my question as to the ratio of the 3 BHB salts which is quite helpful for me. For me, I had Keto O/S and found it quite good – my favorite was the chocolate swirl. But it was and is very expensive. Only 15-20 servings and would break the bank. So I turned to KetoCaNa and I’ve tried two flavours. Both of them were so salty that I almost threw up every time. Like flavoured sea water. Also only 15 serving per bottle. Then I turned to Ketond which is okay – Tigers Blood and Caramel Macchiato. What I like about Ketond is that it has a full 30 servings and is very transparent with it’s ingredients. It’s also the same price as Keto OS but you get 30 servings. But still, not the best taste. So in the end, I ordered 1kg of pure BHB Magnesium from a supplier in China and I will be developing my own Ketone product with 30 servings as a lower price than all the competitors, and with more Magnesium, and Calcium in it than Sodium so that it tastes the best and actually helps with weight loss (which Magnesium is proven to do at the right amount). What the companies don’t tell you is that actually Sodium BHB is the cheapest, then Calcium BHB and then Magnesium BHB to source so I would be interested in knowing if what you wrote is actually true or just an excuse to make the product cheaper. Probably a mix of both. So I have 2 questions Ben: 1. If you had to split the 11.7g of BHB into Sodium, Ca, and Mg, what ratio would you do for the best health results and potential weight loss? The current products on the market are about an 80/12/8 split. I would think it should be the other way around. 2. When I develop my own product and sell it, would you be up for sampling it and reviewing it on your website here? What flavours do you like/would Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones Pros And Cons

Exogenous Ketones Pros And Cons

What Are Exogenous Ketones? Exogenous Ketones (EK for short) are ketone supplements and by definition, a supplement is a thing added to something else in order to complete or enhance it. Think about it like building muscle, good supplements can enhance your results, but if you don’t eat right and exercise, supplements are just useless. You can’t just sit on the couch to watch TV, eat potato chips all day and drink some supplements and expect to gain muscle. A supplement is not a miracle. It’s just an addition and before you add it to your diet, you need to get the basic right first, which is dieting and exercise in the case of building muscles. The supplements are not going to lift the heavy weights for you. You do! Back to the case of EK. If you cheat on your keto diet and eat a ton of carbs, and you want to use EK as a way to feel better and less guilty about it, it’s probably not a smart choice because EK won’t do anything for you (more on this later). However, if you are eating LCHF and somehow you’re not feeling your best, EK can be helpful and we will explain more below. Our Approach We own and manage a few growing Keto Facebook groups with tens of thousands of members and we often see the exogenous ketones topic comes up. We have seen a lot of confusion and criticism as well as support from our members. Most of the complaints are normally because of the expensive price of some products, the lack of understanding about what the product is and what it does to your body or because some sellers/promoters try to bend the truth to get you buy their products or recruit you into their multi level marketing team. We recently ran a survey in our private group and asked people if they have used EK before and if it worked for them. Here’s the result: Many peopl Continue reading >>

What They Don’t Want You To Know About Raspberry Ketones

What They Don’t Want You To Know About Raspberry Ketones

Before you jump on the raspberry ketone bandwagon, there are a few things you should know about this over-priced, proclaimed weight-loss miracle in a bottle. What is it? Raspberry ketone is the natural phenolic compound found in red raspberries (Rubus idaeus). In simple terms, this chemical compound gives berries their signature scent. Until recently, raspberry ketones were used primarily by the perfume and manufactured food industries, but now the compound is being sold in supplement form. Raspberry ketones have been touted as the next weight-loss miracle drug, with manufacturers claiming that the ketones help your body break down fat more efficiently, helping you to lose more weight. Is it true? Before you run to the pharmacy to pick up a bottle, at least finish reading this blog. What I’m about to share with you might surprise (or downright shock) you! Raspberry ketones have never been tested on humans in scientific studies. That’s right. You read that correctly. To date, there have been no human studies showing that raspberry ketones burn fat or benefit your weight loss. Now, if you are a rat, there are two studies of interest. One study gave male rats raspberry ketones, which resulted in an increased secretion of adiponectin, a hormone secreted by fat cells that helps the body break down fat. The result was less fat on the rat. In another rat study, the rodents were fed a high-fat diet with differing amounts of raspberry ketones. The rats that received more raspberry ketones burned more body fat and gained less fat tissue. A third study exposed fat cells in a test tube to raspberry ketones and found that the raspberry ketones stimulated the breakdown of the fat cells. I’ll agree that this is all very interesting research, but it is also considered very prelim Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

My thoughts on Exogenous Ketones After being contacted (following the Youtube Q&A) by several folks – both members of Ketogains and Internet strangers, I felt compelled to write as fair and even-handed a write-up on exogenous ketone supplementation as I feel can be mustered. I condition my response by saying this – I want to deal only in evidence and hypotheses grounded in biochemistry. I admit up front that this will probably become something of a treatise on what constitutes a well-formulated ketogenic diet. I don’t have the time (or the energy) to put together a document that covers all facets of the use of exogenous ketones in sufficient depth, so what I want to do is to address the folks that I see asking me about them most often – those who have excess body fat, and are looking to lose weight. They have been told about the potential benefits to fat loss via exogenous ketones, and they want to know if the hype is real. Those of you who know me (or read my previous post here) know that I like to respond with “it depends.” So…when the question is raised, “Should I supplement with exogenous ketones?” what do you think my answer will be? Probably not! (HA, I tricked you!)…but let’s explore why. As I’m sure this is going to be hotly debated enough (as the topic is raging in numerous ketogenic groups) there isn’t any value in dealing with speculation that doesn’t have a basis in science, nor in anecdotes. The challenge in dealing with exogenous ketone supplementation is two-fold: One side of the debate has a product to sell. Anytime someone’s livelihood is tied to your purchase of their product, bias and subjective interpretation of the evidence should be considered. The evidence (either for or against) their supplemental use by average schl Continue reading >>

My Big, Fat, N=1 Exogenous Ketones Supplementation Experiment (while Eating A Keto Diet)

My Big, Fat, N=1 Exogenous Ketones Supplementation Experiment (while Eating A Keto Diet)

My Big, Fat, n=1 Exogenous Ketones Supplementation Experiment (while Eating a Keto Diet) Here we go. I’ve been slightly apprehensive about sharing this latest experiment with you, because up until recently I was where I’m sure many of you are right now in my belief that exogenous ketones were a mother flippin’ ripoff. After all, all good keto kids know that ketone bodies are the RESULT of putting our bodies successfully in ketosis, so why in the hell would we want to pay to put ketones from outside ourselves into our system? Well, I got my reasons, which I’ll share with you in a bit. First, my purpose: to do an n=1 experiment in order to see if using exogenous ketones can help me lose weight while on a ketogenic diet — that is, a diet that already puts my body in ketosis. ***HUGE DISCLAIMER: I used my own hard-earned money to pay for the exogenous ketones. I was not approached by any company, and I am not doing this experiment on behalf of anybody but myself.*** Now for some background info on me: I’ve been following a keto diet for 20 months now I am approximately 75lbs overweight Aside from an initial fluid loss of 10lb, I have never lost any weight on keto Over these last 20 months I have experimented with altering my macros, intermittent fasting (IF), extended fasting, egg fasting, and meat fasting, and nothing to date has had any measurable, lasting impact on my weight I have PCOS I have low cortisol levels due to chronic Lyme disease that was finally treated in December 2016 and January 2017 I still do consider keto to be a success for me! I used it along with the protocol in the book The Mood Cure to finally get off antidepressants and anti-anxiety medication that I was previously unsuccessful in transitioning off of for 10 years (Note: Don’t ever a Continue reading >>

How Ketogenesis And Ketones Treat Inflammation

How Ketogenesis And Ketones Treat Inflammation

Intro Inflammation is a biological mechanism our bodies use to deal with internal and external events, such as combatting infections, repairing tissues or mitigating the immediate consequences of a fractured bone. However, it often carries a negative connotation since many diseases provoke symptoms through the process of inflammation. So although it is absolutely necessary for keeping the human body functioning properly, like so many things in biology, too much or too little is the problem. Inflammation can be managed with and without drugs. Here we will focus on ketogenesis and ketones with regards to treating inflammation since both drug and drug-free approaches can be discussed. What is ketogenesis? Ketogenesis is the process whereby your body produces molecules called ketone bodies, also known as ketones (see What’s a Ketone?). More specifically, ketogenesis is a series of biochemical reactions that builds molecules (ketones) from parts of other ones (like 2 acetyl-CoA molecules). How ketone bodies are formed? Fellow nerds can gaze upon the ketogenesis pathway below (1) whilst the non-initiated can simply keep in mind that our liver is ground-zero for ketogenesis. This is where fat is used as the raw material to produce 3 kinds of ketone bodies. Humans are remarkably good at ketogenesis. Just for comparison, dogs too can make ketones but the degree to which they require protein, carbohydrate or caloric restriction to do so is greater (2,3). Once you’ve produced enough ketones by upregulating ketogenesis, you eventually move into a metabolic state called ketosis. People are in ketosis when they are on a diet low enough in carbohydrates, known as a ketogenic diet, or when eating very very little if any food at all for example. What a ketogenic diet and fasting hav Continue reading >>

Cupcakes And Ketones; Do Ketone Supplements Really Work?

Cupcakes And Ketones; Do Ketone Supplements Really Work?

I’ve heard several questions about ketone supplementation for fat loss… they seem to be the next big weight-loss fad. But what are they, and do they really work? Ketones are a natural fuel source produced by your body when glucose (sugar) is not available to use as fuel. This is called nutritional ketosis and it happens when you’re on a very low carb diet, or have fasted for an extended period of time. Once you burn through your glucose stores, your body digs into your stored fat for fuel. Fatty acids are released from your fat cells, and your liver uses those fatty acids to create ketones, which are then burned as fuel. Exogenous (from an external source) ketones have recently hit the market and have been hailed by some as the next great magic fat loss pill. Instead of fasting or cutting carb intake so that your body produces ketones, you’re drinking ketones so you body can then use them as fuel. Sounds great, right? Keep eating carbs and receive the fat burning benefits of NOT eating carbs! If something sounds too good to be true, then it probably is. Remember that to create ketones, your liver uses fatty acids from your fat cells to produce them. If you’re drinking the ketones, then you don’t actually have to dig into your own fat stores to create them. Creating the ketones, not burning them, is what causes your body to use fat. And if you’re now using ketones as fuel, but haven’t even used up your glucose stores first (which is how it happens naturally), then what happens to the glucose? You now have 2 fuel sources, and you can’t burn them both at the same time. Well, studies of ketone supplement use do show that as blood ketones increase, blood sugar (glucose) decreases, but it isn’t because you are burning that glucose; it’s because your insu Continue reading >>

(diet Review) Pruvit Keto/os Exogenous Ketones: Ketosis Or Not?

(diet Review) Pruvit Keto/os Exogenous Ketones: Ketosis Or Not?

I’ve gotten a crazy number of requests do this Pruvit Keto/OS review. Keto/OS is a new exogenous ketone supplement that people are using to lose weight, among other things. I found very little in terms of research on exogenous ketones in humans. Exogenous ketones have been studied a bit in rats, and no one has studied them in terms of weight loss in people or in rodents. The product Keto/OS has no research behind it either, so I decided to bite the bullet and put myself on it for a week to see what would happen. I hate using small studies as proof for anything, but in this case, I had no choice. It was totally an n=1. I also hate drinking disgusting things, but again, in this case I had no choice. Sigh. Before I talk about how that all went, let’s chat about ketones and how they work in your body. What are ketones? Ketones are the byproduct of fat metabolism. When you deprive your body of it’s favorite source of energy – glucose – it starts burning your fat for fuel. That’s the premise of the ketogenic diet: burn fat, use the ketones that result as energy. Staying on the ketogenic diet is tough for most people, but it can be done, and for most healthy people, it’s probably not harmful. Check with your doctor or dietitian before starting any diet. Read my ketogenic diet review here. The issue with ketosis for weight loss is that when you break ketosis, the weight will probably come back on. If you’re a person who lives to eat and not eats to live, it might not be the best weight-loss option for you. Because a ketogenic diet is so difficult for most people to maintain, Pruvit is marketing Keto/OS by saying that you can eat a normal diet, drink Keto/OS, still go into ketosis, and lose weight when your body burns fat for energy from being in ‘ketosis’ fr Continue reading >>

Will Taking Exogenous Ketones Stop Fat Loss?

Will Taking Exogenous Ketones Stop Fat Loss?

Would you like to lose some fat? A ketogenic diet is a pretty good tool to help you reach your goal. You can use exogenous ketones which have been a popular way to help get people into ketosis and comply with the transition from eating carbs to eating fats. Once in ketosis, use real food to stay there. Sounds easy, right? Unfortunately, some bro science complicating this topic has been surfacing which must be quashed. People are claiming that exogenous ketones are stopping the fat burning that people are seeking. The same exogenous ketones that help a lot of people experience ketosis and make getting into and staying in ketosis much easier, which makes the fat loss so much easier. SAD! This is how the logic follows from people who don’t really understand physics but like to quote laws of physics to sound fancy like they know how the human body works: Exogenous ketones contain energy. Body fat is stored energy. Therefore, if you consume any energy, you can’t use any stored energy. That’s not really how the body works. At all. By that same rationale, if you were to eat any dietary fat (or any food), then you wouldn’t be able to burn any fat. Unless every single person who has ever lost fat has only done so by doing a water fast, I think this argument and concern is pretty invalid. So before we get further: NO, exogenous ketones do not stop fat burning. Fat loss and fat gain are a little more complicated than people think. I personally don’t believe in the strict calorie in, calorie out model that some people who misunderstand conservation of energy do. Your body is not a bomb calorimeter, so stop telling me that you need to intake a deficit of x amount of calories for y amount of fat loss, people who clearly don’t understand physics (or the human endocrine sys Continue reading >>

Prüvit Ketones Review

Prüvit Ketones Review

Prüvit [1]—or to be more precise, health expert Ben Greenfield—believes carbs are killing us. [2] “We’re operating in a high carb world where food is abundant and it is destroying our brains and bodies,” Greenfield says in his lengthy but chock-a-block blog of information about a better body through ketosis—and, ultimately, his supplements. Supplements that claim will not only help you shed pounds, but build a better body by rewiring your metabolism—or “biohacking”—to give you more energy, strength, and focus while you lose weight and sleep better. Not to mention you’ll be in an amazing mood. It’s a lot of claim. Prüvit supplements are supposed to add ketones to your blood—if you’ve ever been on a low-to-virtually-no carb diet, you’ve heard of ketosis [3]—which triggers weight loss. Greenfield calls it a kind of “body-hacking.” What Prüvit Is and How Does It Work? Prüvit, a play on the words prove and it, cites research that includes articles, studies, and clinical trials, but quickly adds that it’s not responsible for inaccuracies in the data. Not the first in the ketosis or ketone-diet zone by a long shot, nonetheless Prüvit says it’s tackled the “supplement world by creating the world’s first consumer-based ketone supplement drink, KETO//OS®.” [4] Described as a beverage blend of “advanced macro nutritionals (that) promotes optimized cellular regeneration, energy and longevity,” it comes in flavors like Maui-Punch, Chocolate Swirl and Orange Dream that range from $75 to $130 for 20 servings. Another product, KETO/KREME, “derived from the heart of the coconut, is one of the healthiest natural fats known to the world. Our bodies convert fat into energy quickly giving you a powerful mental boost—we call it brai Continue reading >>

Ask The Supplement Expert: Will Ketones Help Me Burn Fat?

Ask The Supplement Expert: Will Ketones Help Me Burn Fat?

Q: Will taking ketone supplements, while eating a normal diet, provide the same fat-loss benefits as being on a seriously carb-restricted, or ketogenic diet? The very short answer to your question is "probably not," but given how complex the burgeoning field of study into nutritional ketosis is, that simple answer requires a bit of unpacking. The basic thinking when it comes to supplementing with ketones and their effect on fat loss is this: When your body is consistently carb-depleted, it produces ketones as a mechanism to utilize fat (and to a lesser extent, amino acids from muscle) as fuel. These ketones can also be used as an alternative to glucose as fuel to support your brain, muscles, heart, and other organs. Once you have a high enough presence of ketones in the blood, usually around 0.5 to 3.0 mM per deciliter of blood (as can be measured with urinalysis ketone strips), you have entered what is known as "nutritional ketosis." To be clear, your body is what is producing those ketones, though. Ketone supplement advocates extend that line of thinking beyond the ketones your body is manufacturing on its own. Their case is that if consuming a ketone supplement raises your blood ketone level to the point where you are technically in ketosis, then you must be burning fat with the same effectiveness if you came by your ketosis the old-fashioned way. Unfortunately, the scant scientific evidence that currently exists doesn't support connecting the dots this way. Researchers out of the University of Sao Paulo, in Brazil, recently gave a group of rats substantial doses of beta hydroxybutyrate (exogenous ketones) both acutely and for four weeks.[1] Not surprisingly, the researchers concluded that consuming oral ketones increased circulating ketones (ketonemia). To which I s Continue reading >>

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