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How Do Ketones Smell Like?

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

Body Odor In Ketosis – What’s Going On?

Body Odor In Ketosis – What’s Going On?

If you are new to ketosis, you may find yourself somewhat puzzled by a couple of odd symptoms that can show up in the first few weeks. In short – the dreaded body odor and bad breath. Now, this can vary from person to person depending on what the state of your health is when you begin the ketogenic diet, and how your body handles the process. If you are coming from a place of quite poor overall health, with years of eating a typical unhealthy diet, plus smoking and drinking, ketosis is going to happen, but there is also going to be a process of detoxing, in which your body begins to clean itself out during ketosis as it gratefully adapts to your new, ‘clean’ way of living and eating. There Are 2 Main Causes of Body Odor When You Are in Ketosis 1. Detoxing This process of detoxing can occur throughout your body, but in particular in your large intestine. A diet that has been high in gluten and refined carbs and low in dietary fibre and fresh, wholesome foods, is likely to have left your large intestine with a fair amount of cleaning out to do. This is the main potential source of the body odour associated with the first phase of going into detox. Also, it is known that the body can often deal with toxins by locking them away in fat deposits. As your body begins to break these down and get rid of them, it also has to get rid of those toxins. The downside of all this is that, if your initial ketosis journey is also one of detox, you may well find yourself with a number of slight personal hygiene issues, like excessive and smelly wind, bad breath, sour sweats and an overall feeling of ickiness. Don’t worry! As anyone who as been through this process will tell you, it is temporary. The major bonus is that you do really feel like you are doing yourself some good whils Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis symptoms are a result of the way the body gets rid of the excess ketone bodies which build up in the blood stream when a person eats a low carb, ketogenic diet. In short, the body has three ways of dealing with excess ketone bodies: First, the muscles liver and brain can burn them for energy in the cells. Second, the body can breathe ketones out through the lungs. And third, the body can flush ketones out through the kidneys and urine. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The ketosis symptoms associated with the benign dietary ketosis caused by eating a low carb, ketogenic diet are not dangerous. They may differ for each individual, with the most common symptoms being: Ketosis breath, which has a fruity odor, and the person in deep ketosis may feel a sort of slight burning in the nose and a slight smell of ammonia. Dry mouth, which is alleviated by drinking more regular tap or bottled water. (Reverse osmosis water will make this worse.) In the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet, most people experience frequent urination followed by fatigue, as insulin levels come down, and the kidneys release extraneous water stores. Minerals such as sodium, magnesium and potassium are also lost with excreted urine, and it is the mineral loss that causes the fatigue. This can be offset by eating more salt, drinking more fluids, and increasing the intake of magnesium and potassium containing foods. (Dairy foods and avocados are high in potassium, and you can drink broth for more sodium.) A slight headache at first which goes away in a few days. This is usually a sign of not getting enough salt. Ketone bodies become detectable in the urine. Ketone bodies are molecu Continue reading >>

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The keto (low carb, LCHF or whatever you want to call it) diet isn’t all bacon, weight loss and happiness. One of the side effects of being in ketosis can be bad breath, also known as keto breath. Sometimes you get it when you’re starting out with a ketogenic diet and have the keto flu. I’ve learned how to keep keto breath under control so it doesn’t bother me much these days. But when I get dehydrated I start getting that metallic taste in my mouth and know it’s probably keto breath. Luckily I know how to fix it now! Who gets it? Since I’ve been on my keto journey, I’ve encountered 3 types of people: People who don’t get keto breath at all – I don’t know why they’re so lucky. Ketosis just doesn’t seem to affect their breath at all. I have no idea why their bodies react differently. People who sometimes get keto breath – Some people don’t feel the keto breath for days and then suddenly it hits them. It can also be worse around the same time each day. If I had to guess, I’d say it’s when they’re starting to get hungry. People who constantly have keto breath – They have it 24/7, some of them can get rid of it temporarily with tricks (I´ll list some below) but some are unfortunately just beyond that. Honestly, I’m not a medical professional and I can’t explain why everyone’s different when it comes to keto breath. You can have two people who eat the exact same low carb food, one of them gets it and the other one doesn’t. Maybe it has something to do with the individuals metabolism. I’d love to hear from anyone who can explain this to me. What is keto breath like? Most people describe it as a fruity, acetone like smell. It can be quite strong. Some people who suffer from it say that they can feel it and almost taste it, like a Continue reading >>

How To Detect Ketosis

How To Detect Ketosis

How can you tell if your low-carbing efforts have been effective enough to induce ketosis? Learn how to check your ketones! The state of ketosis The state of ketosis means that the body has switched from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. This means not only dietary fats (olive oil, guacamole, deep-fried pig ears), but also all the jiggly bits around your waist — clearly a desirable state for anyone looking to shed extra weight. When the body metabolizes fat, it generates molecules called ketones (also known as ketone bodies). As you restrict carbohydrate intake and amp up the dietary fat, more fat is metabolized and a greater quantity of ketones are created. Most of the cells in your body — including those in your brain — are able to use ketones for energy, although many people experience a few days’ adjustment period, often called the low carb flu. One of the varieties of ketones generated — acetone — cannot be used by the body and is excreted as waste, mostly in the urine and the breath. Conveniently, this makes it very simple to measure whether or not you are in ketosis. Upon entering ketosis, some people report a distinct change in the smell of their breath as a result of the extra released acetone. It could be “fruity” — it’s been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic.” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you’re in ketosis. The unusual smell isn’t anything dangerous, but it could be annoying. Drinking plenty of water should help, or get yourself some sugar-free gum. Most people report “keto-breath” diminishing after the first few weeks. Detecting ketones in urine The more accurate way — and the one we recommend — to check f Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Does Burning Fat Cells Cause Bad Breath?

Does Burning Fat Cells Cause Bad Breath?

Burning fat cells does not cause bad breath by itself, but it's possible that your breath smells bad if your diet of choice to burn fat cells involves a very low-carbohydrate eating program. Low-carb diets can cause a condition called ketosis, in which your breath often smells like the chemical acetone. Video of the Day You normally burn carbohydrates for energy, but when you don't have enough carbohydrates available to burn for energy, your body will burn fat instead, according to Fort Valley State University. Burning some fat occasionally doesn't cause ketosis and bad breath, but if your body must rely primarily on fat for energy instead of on carbs, chemicals called ketones can build up in your bloodstream, causing what physicians call ketosis. Once ketones have built up in your bloodstream, your breath begins to smell sweet but bad, according to Fort Valley State University. That's because some of those ketones actually turn into the chemical acetone in your body. Acetone, commonly used as a solvent in industry, smells somewhat sweet. If you're in ketosis, your breath might smell a bit like rotting fruit. Ketosis causes effects other than bad-smelling breath, according to the University of Cincinnati's NetWellness website. If you stay in ketosis long enough, your body will begin to break down its own muscle tissues for fuel, causing fatigue, headaches and nausea. Low-carb dieters often aim for ketosis, believing that it's a sign that their diets are working to burn fat cells. Very low-carb diets do work to help you lose weight, but your kidneys can suffer under the burden of excessive ketones. If you want to burn fat cells but don't want the bad breath and other ill effects involved with a very low-carb diet that causes ketosis, consider trying a diet that's well-ba Continue reading >>

7 Body Smells You Should Never, Ever Ignore

7 Body Smells You Should Never, Ever Ignore

Your sweat smells all sorts of nasty. First of all, let's be frank: sweat is not a sweet-smelling scent, um, ever. But there are certain areas of your body—like your pubic hair and underarms—that naturally give off a stronger scent than your hair, chest, and back. So if you smell yourself in those "stronger" areas, don't freak out right away—as long as things smell the way they normally do, you're probably fine. That said, though, if you notice a strong, more foul, smell coming from those more subtle regions, pay attention. Scott Sullivan, MD, a professor of OBGYN at the Medical University at South Carolina, says a rancid scent could mean your body is struggling with digestion issues. "It's rare, but it happens," he says. It may just be a matter of changing up your diet and adding in more high-fiber foods, but your doctor can advise you on the best course of action. Your morning breath sends your husband running. It's not the sexiest thing in the world, but you may be snoring or sleeping with your mouth open. Those who do tend to have dry mouth, which typically lowers the flow of saliva in your mouth—and saliva is responsible for cleaning out food particles and protecting the teeth and gums from bacterial infection, says Alice Boghosian, spokesperson for the American Dental Association and practicing dentist in Chicago. If that's the case, your dentist can prescribe an artificial saliva mouthwash to help fix the problem. If dry mouth isn't the problem, have your dentist do a thorough checkup to rule out any dental health issues, like gum disease, which Boghosian says can be caused by plaque. Then head to your doctor, as bad breath could be a symptom of various medical conditions such as sinus or lung infections, bronchitis, gastric reflux, a tonsil infection, an Continue reading >>

Is Your Low-carb Diet Giving You Ketosis Breath?

Is Your Low-carb Diet Giving You Ketosis Breath?

One of the possible "side-effects" of following a low-carb diet (be it the Atkins Diet, South Beach Diet, or any other low-carb diet plan) is "bad breath", sometimes accompanied by a bad taste in the mouth. This is distressing, of course, but don't think you're condemned to live with it! Causes There are many causes of bad breath, but if the change in your breath happened suddenly after starting a low-carb diet there are two main causes: 1) bad breath due to acetone caused by ketosis, and 2) an excess of protein in the diet producing ammonia in the breath. Bad Breath from Ketosis ("Keto-Breath" or "Ketosis Breath") One of the results of cutting carbohydrates in our bodies is that we start to use more fat for energy. This process generates molecules called "ketones." One type of ketone, called acetone, tends to be excreted both in the urine and the breath. The description of the smell varies, but it is often described as "fruity" or like the smell of apples which are "past their prime" (or even downright rotten). The good news is that keto-breath usually doesn't last forever. Most people find it dies down after a few weeks or at the most a few months. The reason is unclear, but it seems our bodies adapt in some way. Children on a ketogenic diet for epilepsy have been shown to have less acetone in their breath as time goes on, for example. In the meantime, there are things you can do to minimize the impact of "keto-breath": Drink more water: try 8 glasses per day to see if this helps, and then you can experiment from that point. Natural breath fresheners to try include mint, parsley or other greens, cloves, cinnamon, and fennel seeds. Some people swear by breath capsules, which are usually made from parsley oil (e.g. Mint Assure) for keto-breath. Others find they do not h Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

Ketone Smell

Ketone Smell

Home The last few 100s I've finished, my wife has informed me I have a keytone smell that permeates throughout my body as well as my breath. She has also noticed this to a lesser degree when I've been building mileage. Could this be the result of fat metabolism? It usually subsides after 24-36 hours. Anyone else experience this or are their spouses keeping quiet? I've never really had this problem until the last fews years. Harry Strohm I am not an expert but it is my understanding that a keytone smell would be associated with protien conversion not fat converson. Paul Comet Are you on a diet? Sounds like ketosis. When I fasted on water and vitamin pills for 8 days, I had that smell big-time. I recall reading that the smell comes from muscle tissue being destroyed. But I'm no expert on physiology. Scott Weber When Al Howie brought up diabetes and ketones, here's what he was referring to: When too little insulin is present, your body cannot use glucose for energy. It is then forced to break down fat for energy. Your body produces ketones (acids) and releases them into the blood and urine. When people with Type I diabetes do not take enough insulin, especially in times of stress or illness, ketones are produced. Large amounts of ketones can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a medical emergency. Karl King Ketosis is a result of profoundly low carbohydrate availability and is normally associated with prolonged starvation. The take home message is: eat something, preferably some carbos. I try to run with an intake of 30 to 50 calories per mile and have never experienced a ketone aroma when I run, though I've noted it in others after a long run. Dr Martin W. Fryer, (PhD School of Physiology & Pharmacology University of New South Wales) Without trying to be too technical I think Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

What Does Diabetic Urine Smell Like?

What Does Diabetic Urine Smell Like?

While I have a friend with type II diabetes that controls her weight and diabetes without any pills or shots, I would caution Karen L. Pringle with the Obama Boo Boo … talking in absolutes is dangerous … “If you like your health care … you can keep your health care”. Diet should be considered first in controlling diabetes, but some people will need to stimulate the pancreas to deliver more insulin or add an outside (exogenous Insulin shot) Insulin source. The “sweet” odor of urine and breath is actually a KETOTIC odor from utilizing fats as a source of energy … a KNOWN diabetic should never get in this much trouble … but I have worked in a hospital for 40 years and have seen a lot of stupid shit…. I know people who did it … perhaps they were their own “Munchausen’s” getting attention for themselves. The renal threshold for a normal kidney is 180 mg of glucose per 100 ml of blood. In other words, a normal kidney can actively push urine glucose back into the blood from the glomerular filtrate up to a blood sugar of 180 mg/100 ml blood. This means there would be no urine glucose detected because a mild diabetic may be able to keep their blood sugar below the 180 renal threshold. So the sweet smell is the ketone bodies (Acetone) from fat metabolism because you do not have enough Insulin for the cells to use glucose for their energy needs. The glucose builds up in the blood because the cells need insulin to get it inside the cell where it is needed. In a utopian world, a diabetic person should never get this out of control, when followed by a doctor. More likely, we live in a Faustian world where that box of Devil’s food cupcakes needs to be eaten up, or they might go bad. The other component of fat metabolism is Beta Hydroxy Butyric Acid. That Continue reading >>

You Asked: Why Does My Sweat Smell Like Ammonia?

You Asked: Why Does My Sweat Smell Like Ammonia?

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Maybe you’ve noticed it after a big run: Your sweat has a strong, cloying odor, sort of like a public restroom, perhaps. You may disregard it as an inevitable byproduct of a strenuous workout, but that ammonia smell may be a red flag your diet isn’t keeping up with your energy needs. “Your body normally metabolizes carbohydrates to create the fuel it requires for exercise,” says Dr. William Roberts, a professor of sports and family medicine at the University of Minnesota. “But if you’re exercising hard and don’t have enough carbs to meet your body’s needs, your system will switch over to protein metabolism.” MORE: Is It Healthy To Sweat A Lot? When your body breaks down protein, ammonia is one of the byproducts, Roberts explains. Normally your liver would convert that ammonia into urea, a benign organic compound that your kidneys would dispel of in the form of urine. But if you’re starved of carbs and turning to protein for most of your energy, your liver may not be able to handle all the ammonia your body produces. In those instances, your sweat becomes the vehicle through which your body jettisons all of the extra ammonia in your system. “You see this more in people who eat low-carb and high-protein diets, or people who are over-exercisers, like ultra marathoners,” says Dr. Lewis Maharam, a New York-based physician and author of the Running Doc’s Guide to Healthy Running. Maharam says dehydration can also contribute to the smell because it makes your sweat more concentrated. “If your urine is very dark yellow or brown, you’re not drinking enough water, and that could be part of the reason you’re smelling that ammonia.” (He’s quick to add that over-hydration is a more common issue among endura Continue reading >>

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

So I thought I might be in ketosis. I don't eat a whole lot in the way of carbs, just potatoes, fruit, and a square or two of 85% dark chocolate, a few times a week. On potato or fruit days probably around 80g carbs, other days around 40g, I think. I'm estimating on the higher side because I don't really count them. I don't have a particular macro goal and weight loss isn't something I'm trying to do, but if it happens that is okay, too. I don't have keto-breath, but my armpit smell has been, ah, different lately (sharper, almost chemicallish which sounds kinda like the breath description, sorry if it's TMI) so I thought ketosis might be the cause. I got some ketostix and gave myself a test and came up on the trace level. (Also, last night was a potato night so perhaps that could affect it. I plan to continue testing for a few days, do a little N=1 experimentation.) Is this significant? Do you burn more fat/is it desirable when your ketone levels are higher or is it more of an on/off sort of thing? Also, if I am in ketosis and that's the cause of my yuck-smell, does that go away if you keep yourself in ketosis? Does it persist if you bounce around in and out of keto? I'm trying to decide, if I am in ketosis, if I want to stay here or not. I love my calendula deodorant, but to be honest Tom's of MAINE doesn't understand what summer in the South is like and I don't like the smell, assuming it is because of ketosis. If I am in ketosis and I like it, I can always go again in the winter when Tom's of Maine might have a chance. Continue reading >>

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