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How Do Ketone Bodies Affect Blood Ph?

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Generally, ketone concentrations are lower in the morning and higher in the evening. Whatever time you pick to measure ketone levels, make sure to keep it consistent. Also, do not measure your ketone levels right after exercise. Ketone levels tend to be lower while your glucose levels higher so you won't get representative numbers. Keep in mind there are daily fluctuations caused by changes in hormone levels. Don't get discouraged! Another aspect that affects the level of ketones is the amount of fat in your diet. Some of you may show higher concentration of ketones after a high-fat meal. Coconut oil contains MCTs that will help you boost ketones. To easily increase your fat intake on a ketogenic diet, try fat bombs - snacks with at least 80% fat content. Ketone levels tend to be higher after extensive aerobic exercise as your body depletes glycogen stores. Exercise may help you get into ketosis faster. ketogenic "fruity" breath is not pleasant for most people. To avoid this, drink a lot of water, mint tea and make sure you eat foods rich in electrolytes. Avoid too many chewing gums and mints, as it may put you out of ketosis; there may be hidden carbs affecting your blood sugar. Increase your electrolyte intake, especially potassium. You are likely going to lose some sodium and potassium when switching to the keto diet. Finally, if you find it hard to lose weight on a ketogenic diet, there may be plenty other reasons than the level of ketone bodies: Not Losing Weight on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up and Read Further. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: Understanding The Differences

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: Understanding The Differences

Introduction to Ketosis vs Ketoacidosis Historically, ketosis has been one of the most vaguely defined and poorly understood concepts of the last century. There are different scenarios in which are body can be in a state of ketosis (including ketoacidosis). The most basic definition of ketosis is a general increase in blood levels of ketone bodies to 0.5 mmol or above. However, the reasons for the development of ketosis, the resultant levels of blood ketones, and the associated outcomes (health versus possible death) differ drastically between different situations of ketosis. Failure to understand the differences between various incidents of ketosis has led to the common misconceptions we have today that ultimately has made educating the masses on the ketogenic diet difficult. The single most important take home from this article should be that diabetic ketoacidosis is not the same as the ketosis experienced from a ketogenic diet. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Whenever I speak about ketogenic dieting, almost inevitably I am asked the question: “But shouldn’t you be worried about going into a state of ketoacidosis?” Ketoacidosis occurs when the formation ketone bodies are uncontrolled (15-25 mmol) and acidity in the blood increases (1). It is important to understand that our body regulates blood acid concentrations tightly. We typically measure blood acidity vs. alkalinity using the pH scale. If your blood’s pH is less than 7 it is acidic, and if greater it is basic, or alkaline. Our blood is usually slightly alkaline with a pH ranging from 7.35 to 7.45. Any deviation up or down from the norm by even the smallest amount can prove fatal! The most common form of ketoacidosis to occur is known as diabetic ketoacidosis. This usually occurs in type I diabetics but can also oc Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Workup

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Workup

Approach Considerations Diabetic ketoacidosis is typically characterized by hyperglycemia over 250 mg/dL, a bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq/L, and a pH less than 7.30, with ketonemia and ketonuria. While definitions vary, mild DKA can be categorized by a pH level of 7.25-7.3 and a serum bicarbonate level between 15-18 mEq/L; moderate DKA can be categorized by a pH between 7.0-7.24 and a serum bicarbonate level of 10 to less than 15 mEq/L; and severe DKA has a pH less than 7.0 and bicarbonate less than 10 mEq/L. [17] In mild DKA, anion gap is greater than 10 and in moderate or severe DKA the anion gap is greater than 12. These figures differentiate DKA from HHS where blood glucose is greater than 600 mg/dL but pH is greater than 7.3 and serum bicarbonate greater than 15 mEq/L. Laboratory studies for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) should be scheduled as follows: Repeat laboratory tests are critical, including potassium, glucose, electrolytes, and, if necessary, phosphorus. Initial workup should include aggressive volume, glucose, and electrolyte management. It is important to be aware that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

The Alkaline Diet Vs Acidic Ketones

The Alkaline Diet Vs Acidic Ketones

Whether you think eating alkaline foods is useful or woo woo junk it appears that metabolic acidosis is a thing. Metabolic acidosis seems to be interrelated with insulin resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and retention of muscle mass. To prevent metabolic acidosis, it appears prudent to ensure that your body has adequate minerals to enable your kidneys to balance pH over the long term. This can be achieved by eating plenty of veggies and/or supplementing with alkaline minerals (e.g. magnesium, sodium, potassium, zinc etc). If you eat plenty of veggies you’re probably getting enough alkalising minerals, however, you can easily test your urine to see if your dietary acid load is high. If you are targeting a high fat therapeutic ketogenic diet, following a zero-carb dietary approach and/or taking exogenous ketones it seems then it may be even more important to be mindful of your acid load and consider mineral supplementation. Recently I had a fascinating, surprising and exciting experience during a fast. The chart below shows my ketones, glucose and ‘total energy’ (i.e. glucose plus ketones) over the seven days. My ketones increased to above 8.0 mmol/L. They even couldn’t be read on my ketone metre! It was the full keto brochure experience. It was like my body fat was effortlessly feeding my brain with delicious, succulent ketones! I felt great. This chart shows my glucose : ketone index (GKI) dropping to below 0.5 after a few days. The orange dots in this chart shows the relationship between glucose and ketones about 18 months ago when I first started trying this keto thing (after I read ‘Jimmy’s Moore’s Keto Clarity’). The blue dots show the relationship between my glucose and ketones during the recent fast. As you can see from the much flatter line, my blood g Continue reading >>

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

Diabetes causes your body's pH levels to become more acidic and develop a condition called ketoacidosis, the American Diabetes Association explains. Your body's pH level refers to the acidity or alkalinity of the fluids in your body. Diabetes impairs your body's ability to properly utilize the glucose in your blood. Instead, your body is forced to convert fat into energy through a process that develops into ketoacidosis. Diagnosing ketoacidosis involves testing blood for the presence of ketones, the University of Maryland Medical Center explains. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is congenital, and its symptoms appear as early as childhood, MayoClinic.com explains. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by your body's inability to produce insulin, the hormone needed for cells to metabolize glucose into energy. Type 2 diabetes is essentially defined by acquired insulin resistance that usually manifests in adulthood. Both types of diabetes cause increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, hypertension and ketoacidosis. Left untreated, both types of diabetes lead to complications that damage your cardiovascular system, kidneys and nerves due to the accumulated glucose in your blood. Complications due to diabetes such as ketoacidosis are fatal if not treated. Ketones are the acidic byproducts of fat breakdown that accumulate when your body uses fat instead of glucose as a source of fuel, MedlinePlus, a service of the National Institutes of Health, explains. As your ketone levels increase, your body becomes more acidic. Ketones are present in both types of diabetes but are generally more typical of type 1 diabetes. Ketones are also sometimes present in urine. Acetone and acetoacetic acid are examples of ketones. Ketoacidosis does not happen o Continue reading >>

Effect Of Ketone Bodies On Glucose Production And Utilization In The Miniature Pig.

Effect Of Ketone Bodies On Glucose Production And Utilization In The Miniature Pig.

The effect of ketone bodies on glucose production (Ra) and utilization (Rd) was investigated in the 24-h starved, conscious unrestrained miniature pig. Infusing Na-DL-beta-OH-butyrate (Na-DL-beta-OHB) and thus shifting the blood pH from 7.40 to 7.56 resulted in a decrease of Ra by 52% and of Rd by 45%, as determined by the isotope dilution technique. Simultaneously, the concentrations of arterial insulin and glucagon were slightly enhanced, whereas the plasma levels of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, alpha-amino-N, and free fatty acids (FFA) were all reduced. Infusion of Na-bicarbonate, which yielded a similar shift in blood pH, did not mimick these effects. Infusion of equimolar amounts of the ketoacid, yielding a blood pH of 7.35, induced similar metabolic alterations with respect to plasma glucose, Ra, Rd, and insulin; however, plasma alanine and alpha-amino-N increased. Infusing different amounts of Na-DL-beta-OHB resulting in plasma steady state levels of ketones from 0.25 to 1.5 mM had similar effects on arterial insulin and glucose kinetics. No dose dependency was observed. Prevention of the Na-DL-beta-OHB-induced hypoalaninemia by simultaneous infusion of alanine (1 mumol/kg X min) did not prevent hypoglycemia. Infusion of Na-DL-beta-OHB plus insulin (0.4 mU/kg X min) showed no additive effect on the inhibition of Ra. Ketones did not inhibit the insulin-stimulated metabolic clearance rate (MCR) for glucose. Infusion of somatostatin (0.2 micrograms/kg X min) initially decreased plasma glucose, Ra, and Rd, which was followed by an increase in plasma glucose and Ra; however, on infusion of somatostatin plus Na-DL-beta-OHB, hypoglycemia and the reduced Ra were maintained. In the anaesthetized 24-h starved miniature pig, Na-DL-beta-OHB infusion decreased the hep Continue reading >>

In Depth Look At Ketogenic Diets And Ketosis

In Depth Look At Ketogenic Diets And Ketosis

What exactly is Ketosis? The metabolic state of ketosis simply means that the quantity of ketone bodies in the blood have reached higher-than-normal levels. When the body is in a ketogenic state, this means that lipid energy metabolism is intact. The body will start breaking down your own body fat to fuel the body's normal, everyday functions. What's So Great About Being In Ketosis? Establishing this metabolic state of ketosis even for a short period of time has many outstanding benefits. Benefit 1 The main benefit of ketosis is that it increases the body's ability to utilize fats for fuel, which gets very lazy on a high-carbohydrate diet. When on high-carbohydrate diets, the body can usually expect an energy source to keep entering the body. But in the state of ketosis, the body has to become efficient at mobilizing fats as energy. Benefit 2 Ketosis has a protein-sparing effect, assuming that you are consuming adequate quantities of protein and calories—0.7 grams per pound of body weight per day—in the first place.[1] Once in ketosis, the body actually prefers ketones to glucose. Since the body has copious quantities of fat, this means there is no need to oxidize protein to generate glucose through gluconeogenesis. Benefit 3 Another benefit has to do with the low levels of insulin in the body, which causes greater lipolysis and free-glycerol release compared to a normal diet when insulin is around 80-120. Insulin has a lipolysis-blocking effect, which can inhibit the use of fatty acids as energy. Also, when insulin is brought to low levels, beneficial hormones are released in the body, such as growth hormone and other powerful growth factors. Benefit 4 Another small but very important benefit of the ketogenic diet is that when in the state of ketosis, ketones, alon Continue reading >>

Alkalinity, Ph Balance & Designing The Optimal Keto-alkaline Diet

Alkalinity, Ph Balance & Designing The Optimal Keto-alkaline Diet

“Your blood becomes more acidic when you eat all that meat!” the interviewee said, and I almost pulled off the road in consternation. I was driving recently, listening to a well-known nutrition expert talk about an alkaline diet’s many benefits. I found myself nodding in agreement until she delved into murky – OK, completely inaccurate – science about an overly acidic diet wrecking your blood pH. Often well intended, confusion and outright misinformation surround pH-balanced diets. As a medical doctor who often prescribes keto-alkaline diets to patients, I want to dispel that confusion. Clearing up the confusion: What’s an alkaline state all about? To do that, we’ll need to flash back to high school biochemistry, where you’ll probably remember studying pH and acid versus base (alkalinity). If you can’t recall, or would rather not go back mentally, let me provide a brief refresher course. (I promise to be painless and brief.) An acronym for “power of hydrogen,” researchers measure the total hydrogen ion concentration in a solution using pH. You can measure any aqueous (water-containing) solution to determine its pH. The pH scale ranges from one to 14. Seven is neutral. Anything higher than seven becomes alkaline (base); anything lower than seven is acidic (acid). Using that scale, human blood is quite stable at about 7.4, making it alkaline. The ocean has a pH of about 8.1. The optimal pH for a pool is 7.4, about the same pH as human eyes and your mucous membrane. Growing research show an alkaline state is healthier for your body, and most tissues and cells maintain an alkaline pH balance. Your blood pH doesn’t change, and even slight deviations above or below that 7.4 ideal become extremely life threatening. On the other hand, things like food ca Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies

Ketone Bodies

Ketone bodies Acetone Acetoacetic acid (R)-beta-Hydroxybutyric acid Ketone bodies are three water-soluble molecules (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and their spontaneous breakdown product, acetone) that are produced by the liver from fatty acids[1] during periods of low food intake (fasting), carbohydrate restrictive diets, starvation, prolonged intense exercise,[2], alcoholism or in untreated (or inadequately treated) type 1 diabetes mellitus. These ketone bodies are readily picked up by the extra-hepatic tissues, and converted into acetyl-CoA which then enters the citric acid cycle and is oxidized in the mitochondria for energy.[3] In the brain, ketone bodies are also used to make acetyl-CoA into long-chain fatty acids. Ketone bodies are produced by the liver under the circumstances listed above (i.e. fasting, starving, low carbohydrate diets, prolonged exercise and untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus) as a result of intense gluconeogenesis, which is the production of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources (not including fatty acids).[1] They are therefore always released into the blood by the liver together with newly produced glucose, after the liver glycogen stores have been depleted (these glycogen stores are depleted after only 24 hours of fasting)[1]. When two acetyl-CoA molecules lose their -CoAs, (or Co-enzyme A groups) they can form a (covalent) dimer called acetoacetate. Beta-hydroxybutyrate is a reduced form of acetoacetate, in which the ketone group is converted into an alcohol (or hydroxyl) group (see illustration on the right). Both are 4-carbon molecules, that can readily be converted back into acetyl-CoA by most tissues of the body, with the notable exception of the liver. Acetone is the decarboxylated form of acetoacetate which cannot be converted Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways to Measure Your Ketones A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. Research has demonstrated that this nutrition plan improves insulin sensitivity and reduces inflammation throughout the body. This leads to greater fat metabolism and muscle development as well as a reduced risk of chronic disease. (1, 2). I get asked all the time how to measure the state of ketosis. There are several major ways and we will discuss those in this article. Measuring Your Ketones There are three types of ketone bodies: Acetone, Acetoacetate and Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB). Each of these three can be tested as acetone is a ketone released through the breath, acetoacetate is a ketone released through urine and BHB is (although not technically a ketone it acts like a ketone) in the blood stream and used by the cells for energy. 1. Blood Ketone Meter This measures BHB and is considered to be the most accurate way to measure ketone bodies. These have the ability to determine the ketone level in your blood precisely but they are also pricey and invasive. Personally, I freak out every time I have to prick my finger!! The Precision Xtra blood glucose and ketone meter is a good buy at $28-$30. The expensive part is the ketone test strips here which can cost $4 each. If you are looking at testing yourself every day it is going to cost you $120 a month and the $30 meter. Here is a starter kit you can get on Amazon Most people will enter into a light nutritional ketosis (between 0.5-1.0 mmol/L on the meter) within two or three days. It typically takes Continue reading >>

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones, ketosis, ketoacidosis, DKA…these are words that you’ve probably heard at one point or another, and you might be wondering what they mean and if you need to worry about them at all, especially if you have diabetes. This week, we’ll explore the mysterious world of ketones, including if and how they may affect you. Ketones — what are they? Ketones are a type of acid that the body can form if there’s not enough carbohydrate to be burned for energy (yes, you do need carbs for fuel). Without enough carb, the body turns to another energy source: fat. Ketones are made in the liver from fat breakdown. This is called ketogenesis. People who don’t have diabetes can form ketones. This might occur if a person does extreme exercise, has an eating disorder, is fasting (not eating), or is following a low-carbohydrate diet. This is called ketosis and it’s a normal response to starvation. In a person who has diabetes, ketones form for the same reason (not enough carb for energy), but this often occurs because there isn’t enough insulin available to help move carb (in the form of glucose) from the bloodstream to the cells to be used for energy. Again, the body scrambles to find an alternate fuel source in the form of fat. You might be thinking that it’s a good thing to burn fat for fuel. However, for someone who has diabetes, ketosis can quickly become dangerous if it occurs due to a continued lack of insulin (the presence of ketones along with “normal” blood sugar levels is not necessarily a cause for concern). In the absence of insulin (which can occur if someone doesn’t take their insulin or perhaps uses an insulin pump and the pump has a malfunction, for example), fat cells continue to release fat into the circulation; the liver then continues to churn Continue reading >>

X 30 - Bd

X 30 - Bd

Effect of Ketone Bodies on Glucose Production and Utilization in the Miniature Pig Manfred J. Muller, Ulrich Paschen, and Hans J. Seitz Institut fur Physiologische Chemie, Universitits-Krankenhaus Eppendorf, 2000 Hamburg 20, Federal Republic of Germany As bstract. The effect of ketone bodies on glucose production (Ra) and utilization (Rd) was investigated in the 24-h starved, conscious unrestrained miniature pig. Infusing Na-DL-3-OH-butyrate (Na-DL-f-OHB) and thus shifting the blood pH from 7.40 to 7.56 resulted in a decrease of Ra by 52% and of Rd by 45%, as determined by the isotope dilution technique. Simultaneously, the concentrations of arterial insulin and glucagon were slightly enhanced, whereas the plasma levels of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, a-amino-N, and free fatty acids (FFA) were all reduced. Infusion of Na-bicarbonate, which yielded a similar shift in blood pH, did not mimick these effects. Infusion of equimolar amounts of the ketoacid, yielding a blood pH of 7.35, induced similar metabolic alterations with respect to plasma glucose, Ra, Rd, and insulin; however, plasma alanine and a-amino-N in- creased. Infusing different amounts of Na-DL-3-OHB resulting in plasma steady state levels of ketones from 0.25 to 1.5 mMhad similar effects on arterial insulin and glucose kinetics. No dose dependency was observed. Prevention of the Na-DL-3-OHB-induced hypoala- ninemia by simultaneous infusion of alanine (1 ttmol/kg X min) did not prevent hypoglycemia. Infusion of Na-DL-l-OHB plus insulin (0.4 mU/kg In conducting the experiments described in this report, the investigators adhered to the Guiding Principles in The Care And Use Of Animals approved by the Council of The American Physiological Society. The facilities are fully accredited by the Gesundheitsbeho Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies Formed In The Liver Are Exported To Other Organs

Ketone Bodies Formed In The Liver Are Exported To Other Organs

Ketone Bodies In human beings and most other mammals, acetyl-CoA formed in the liver during oxidation of fatty acids may enter the citric acid cycle (stage 2 of Fig. 16-7) or it may be converted to the "ketone bodies" acetoacetate, D-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone for export to other tissues. (The term "bodies" is a historical artifact; these compounds are soluble in blood and urine.) Acetone, produced in smaller quantities than the other ketone bodies, is exhaled. Acetoacetate and D-β-hydroxybutyrate are transported by the blood to the extrahepatic tissues, where they are oxidized via the citric acid cycle to provide much of the energy required by tissues such as skeletal and heart muscle and the renal cortex. The brain, which normally prefers glucose as a fuel, can adapt to the use of acetoacetate or D-β-hydroxybutyrate under starvation conditions, when glucose is unavailable. A major determinant of the pathway taken by acetyl-CoA in liver mitochondria is the availability of oxaloacetate to initiate entry of acetyl-CoA into the citric acid cycle. Under some circumstances (such as starvation) oxaloacetate is drawn out of the citric acid cycle for use in synthesizing glucose. When the oxaloacetate concentration is very low, little acetyl-CoA enters the cycle, and ketone body formation is favored. The production and export of ketone bodies from the liver to extrahepatic tissues allows continued oxidation of fatty acids in the liver when acetyl-CoA is not being oxidized via the citric acid cycle. Overproduction of ketone bodies can occur in conditions of severe starvation and in uncontrolled diabetes. The first step in formation of acetoacetate in the liver (Fig. 16-16) is the enzymatic condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA, catalyzed by thiolase; this is simply Continue reading >>

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