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How Dangerous Is Ketoacidosis

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Certainly a low carb approach doesn’t work with Type 1’s, right? What about the dangerous risks of hypoglycemia? Actually, this thinking is repeated over and over. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, those using a low carbohydrate high healthy fat (LCHF) approach have much more stable blood sugars, some nearly eliminating hypoglycemic episodes altogether. It really makes perfect sense. Why this reasoning is shunned, defies logic. Think about it…less (fast acting, blood-sugar-spiking) carbs, less insulin, less hypos. Before we go further in this post, I’d like you to read this powerfully compelling account of Dr. Keith Runyan, MD, a Nephrologist, who is a Type 1, and who successfully uses a carb restricted approach to manage his diabetes. Please read his story (link below). There is no way I could do this story justice in fewer words. The entire article is needed to understand its full impact. Afterwards, I would recommend his accompanying video. Nutritional Ketosis vs Diabetic Ketoacidosis Much of the backlash from mainstream beliefs regarding the use of carb restriction with Type 1’s stems from the lack of understanding about the difference between nutritional ketosis and diabetic ketoacidosis. I’m going to quote directly from Diabetes Daily Website. Here is the content of their article entitled “Why DKA and Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same”…(read the full article HERE) “There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstanding lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50g of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person into a state of “nutritional ketosis.” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Using Invokana To Treat Diabetes Can Lead To Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Using Invokana To Treat Diabetes Can Lead To Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Millions of people are living with type 2 diabetes in the United States. Depending on the severity of the condition, some patients may need to take medication to control their symptoms and prevent dangerous complications. Unfortunately, however, one such medication used to treat type 2 diabetes has since been linked to the dangerous condition diabetic ketoacidosis. This medication, Invokana, was designed to improve glycemic control and lower blood sugar levels in diabetic patients. It is also accompanied by several potentially harmful side effects. FDA Warning About Ketoacidosis In May of 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning with regard to Invokana and Invokamet use. The warning contained the following information: Type 2 diabetes medications Invokana and Invokamet may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis. Patients taking the drugs developed diabetic ketoacidosis in 20 reported cases, with additional reports continuing to unfold. In these cases, the patients needed an emergency room visit or hospitalization. People taking Invokana must be on the lookout for symptoms of ketoacidosis. Some of the symptoms that may arise include difficulty breathing, vomiting, nausea, confusion, unusual fatigue, and abdominal pain. As a result of the warning, many patients who have taken Invokana to treat their diabetes and later developed harmful side effects are pursuing legal action against the drug’s maker. What Is Ketoacidosis? When the body produces high levels of blood acids known as ketones, this is known as diabetic ketoacidosis. This condition develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin. Without sufficient insulin, the body begins to break down fat as fuel instead of sugar. This process then produces a build-up of acids in the bloodstream known as keto Continue reading >>

Pegaspargase: A Rare But Dangerous Cause Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Pegaspargase: A Rare But Dangerous Cause Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract: Background: L-asparginase is reported to cause hyperglycemia in approximately 10% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Pegaspargase, a form of L-asparginase linked with polyethylene glycol, has been associated with less hyperglycemia than native L-asparginase (1). Clinical Case: A 32-year-old Hispanic male was diagnosed with ALL in August 2015. His body mass index was 26 kg/m2 and physical exam was notable for acanthosis nigricans on the neck. Family history was negative for diabetes or endocrine disorders. A few days later, he was admitted for chemotherapy with HyperCVAD and asparagase and found to have a white blood cell count (WBC) of 102.6 k/ul on labs. Due to high risk for tumor lysis syndrome, he underwent leukopheresis for two days and received prednisone 40 mg PO daily for three days. After WBC improved, chemotherapy was initiated and he received dexamethasone 40 mg PO daily on days 1 to 4 and days 11 to 14 as well as pegaspargase (2500 units/m2, intravenously) on day 11. He received one dose of hydrocortisone 100 mg intravenously prior to pegaspargase dose on day 11. While receiving dexamethasone on days 1 to 4, blood glucose (BG) increased to 211 mg/dl but returned to normal after steroids were stopped. However, during days 11 to 14 of treatment, after receiving the doses of hydrocortisone and pegaspargase and two doses of dexamethasone, his BG was 397 mg/dl on routine labs. On the following day, BG was >600 mg/dl and he had an anion gap of 19. Urinalysis revealed ketonuria and glucosuria. He was transferred to the intensive care unit for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and started on IV insulin and fluid therapy. He finished his course of dexamethasone the following day. BG levels and anion gap improved. He was transitioned to subcutaneo Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Fear, Uncertainty And Doubt

Ketosis: Fear, Uncertainty And Doubt

Perhaps nothing is more damaging to the new low-carber than the intentional spread of fear, uncertainty and doubt regarding the state of ketosis compared to the dangerous state of ketoacidosis. The former is a natural and healthy state of existence, the latter is a condition that threatens the life of type 1 diabetics and type 2 diabetics whose disease has progressed to the point where their pancreatic beta cells can no longer produce insulin (ketoacidosis is also a risk for alcoholics). So if you’re not an alcoholic, a type 1 diabetic or a late-stage type 2 diabetic, fear of ketosis is misdirected. You should regard with suspicion anyone who confuses the two and warns you against a low-carb diet because they cannot tell the difference. The confusion between ketosis and ketoacidosis is a sign of a grave misunderstanding of basic biology (if not a complete lack of critical faculty). So too is the assumption that ketosis is the “early stage” of ketoacidosis or that “ketosis leads to ketoacidosis” in a person whose pancreas is still able to produce insulin. If you don’t trust me (and why should you), you should consider listening to some people who know a lot more about this than either you or I ever will: Nutritional ketosis is by definition a benign metabolic state… by contrast, ‘diabetic ketoacidosis’ is an unstable and dangerous condition that occurs when there is inadequate pancreatic insulin response to regulate serum B-OHB. This occurs only in type-1 diabetics or in late stage type-2 diabetics with advanced pancreatic burnout. (Dr. Phinney & Dr. Volek, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, p.4) Later in the book (p.80), Phinney and Volek explain further: [Type-1 diabetics] need insulin injections not just to control blood glucose levels, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis (dka) Vs Ketosis What’s The Difference?

Ketoacidosis (dka) Vs Ketosis What’s The Difference?

Although ketosis and ketoacidosis may sound the same, they are two distinct things. We are going to be talking about the difference between ketoacidosis and ketosis and what makes the two diverse from one another. In order to provide a good explanation of what these conditions are and how they affect the body, we must talk about their main common denominator, the ketones. These are organic compounds that the body will provide when it starts to burn stored fat instead of burning glucose or sugar when it requires energy. What is Ketoacidosis? DKA applies to diabetic ketoacidosis and is a complication of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition that makes it difficult for your body to be able to produce a good level of insulin. Your levels of ketones can rise to very dangerous levels, which will also increase your blood sugar. The ketones create a very acidic environment inside your body, and the function of certain organs will be affected severely. It becomes a life-threatening situation when presented with high levels of ketones and excess blood sugar. Anyone not given proper treatment for DKA could end up in a coma and even die. The kidneys and liver are affected more than most other organs, and this can create a very serious health issue. Once a person develops what is known as diabetic ketoacidosis, they will show severe symptoms within as little as 24 hours. When a person has type one diabetes, they are in great danger of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. What is ketosis The best way to explain ketosis is to consider it a very mild form of ketoacidosis, and the truth is that this is not going to be harmful most of the time. In your lifestyle, if you’re on a ketogenic diet nutrition plan or any long-term low-carb diet, you might be experiencing ke Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference paper. Here's a table of the actual numbers to show the differences in magnitude: Body Condition Quantity of Ketones Being Produced After a meal: 0.1 mmol/L Overnight Fast: 0.3 mmol/L Ketogenic Diet (Nutritional ketosis): 1-8 mmol/L >20 Days Fasting: 10 mmol/L Uncontrolled Diabetes (Ketoacidosis): >20 mmol/L Here's a more detailed explanation: Fact 1: Every human body maintains the blood and cellular fluids within a very narrow range between being too acidic (low pH) and too basic (high pH). If the blood pH gets out of the normal range, either too low or too high, big problems happen. Fact 2: The Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis So Dangerous?

Why Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis So Dangerous?

The main thing, which Carol Linn Miller so very correctly points out, is that diabetic ketoacidosis can be fatal. But having been through it, what makes the condition so dangerous is you don't necessarily feel like you need to get it treated. You go off into a kind of la-la land, and don't take necessary action. If you wait too long, you may die. I didn't go to an ER until I suddenly went blind, and it turned out I was near death. I knew something was wrong, but the part of my brain that tells you "Danger! Danger!" wasn't working. Continue reading >>

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

Dangers Ketosis

Dangers Ketosis

Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. What does ketosis 7 Dec 2017 In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. With that being said, it's also good to talk about possible ketosis side-effects when ingesting these specific ketone supplements, so you know fully what to 1 Jan 2016 Defining ketosis. How to Get Into Ketosis 3. It's merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a potentially serious condition, whereas a number of popular diets cite ketosis as being an essential part of weight loss. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. Anytime you change your body's primary energy source from carbohydrates to fat, your blood becomes flush Aug 21, 2017 Ketogenic Diet Dangers - Ketogenic diets are so popular due to the fast weight loss results and health benefits. I feel a moral and social obligation to share what I understand of these diets, from my perspective as a medical researcher. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. It's not clear what kind of possible long-term health risks a low-carb diet may pose because most research studies have lasted less than a year. Eric Westman, director of the Lifestyle Medicine Clinic at Duke University. It is the latest fastest-growing fad out there. In the 1970s, Dr. This blog is dedicated to those curious about what are those Ketoacidosis is dangerous. However, what are some negative aspects. patreon. If so, your doctor is confusing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with nutritional ketosis, or keto-adapta Continue reading >>

Dangers Ketosis

Dangers Ketosis

Our body can produce, from fat and some amino acids, three ketone bodies (a “ketone” refers the chemical structure It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. DKA includes levels of ketones that are unnaturally high and blood sugar levels three or more times higher than the norm. The next time you have a physical or otherwise see your physician or nurse practitioner, ask his or her thoughts about ketosis. Depending on your size, you can store roughly in the range of 1500-2000 calories of 26 Jun 2017 A frequent concern that comes up for some people when I talk about following a very low-carb Paleo diet is whether ketosis, ketones or a ketogenic diet are dangerous. 21 Feb 2017 But not everyone shares that enthusiasm. Choose a section, or keep reading below for all of them. First, some semantics. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or You may have heard from your doctor that ketosis is a life-threatening condition. Whether you go on a ketogenic diet for weight loss or to manage a health condition, you'll be eating fewer carbohydrates, much more fat and moderately more protein than on a typical diet. The vast majority of them are either grossly Jun 7, 2016 Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. 19 Oct 2015 Although the adverse effects related to the ketogenic diet are generally less serve than those of anticonvulsant medications used to treat epilepsy, individuals following the diet may experience a number of undesirable effects. Ketosis is described as being potentially dangerous as very high level of ketones can make the blood acidic, a state known as ketoacidosis, which can Whether you go on a ketogenic diet for weight loss or to manage a health condition, you'll be Continue reading >>

More Type 1 Diabetes Kids Face Dangerous Complications

More Type 1 Diabetes Kids Face Dangerous Complications

A growing number of American children and teens with type 1 diabetes are experiencing a life-threatening complication at the time of their diagnosis, a new study finds. Late diagnosis Researchers say a lack of insurance may mean some children are getting diagnosed with type 1 late in its development, when serious complications can arise. The complication is called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which involves dangerously high blood sugar and substances in the blood called ketones. Patients with the condition can suffer long-term health damage. "DKA is characterized by hyperglycaemia [elevated blood sugar levels] and ketonaemia [elevated acid ketones], that, when not buffered by the body, will turn the blood acidic," explained one expert, Dr. Patricia Vuguin, a paediatric endocrinologist at Cohen Children's Medical Centre in New Hyde Park, New York. "Usual symptoms are vomiting, excessive thirst and urine production, as well as abdominal pain that may be severe," added Vuguin, who was not involved in the new study. "Severe DKA may lead to swelling of the brain tissue also known as cerebral oedema, which may cause headache, coma, and can lead to death." In the new study, a team led by Dr. Arleta Rewers, from the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, looked at the medical records of more than 3,400 patients younger than 18 in Colorado who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 1998 and 2012. They found that 39 percent of the children had diabetic ketoacidosis at the time of their diagnosis. 55 percent increase in the rate of DKA patients What's more, there was a 55 percent increase in the rate of patients with the complication at the time of diagnosis during the study period – from 30 percent in 1998 to 46 percent in 2012, the study found. The only pati Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

There’s a common saying in the diabetes community that diabetes won’t kill you, but it’s complications will. Still, according to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, with over 69,000 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death. [1] Add to that the common complications, like cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and infection, and you can multiply that number by 10! Yet despite these eye-opening statistics, I still see far too many people not taking diabetes seriously. They approach it as something that’s a nuisance rather than something that can and does cause major health complications, and yes even death, if uncontrolled. “Sometimes I pretend I’m not diabetic, but that’s a dangerous game.” – Unknown Diabetes is more dangerous than most people assume, and so it becomes easy for many people with diabetes to get lax in their efforts to manage the dysfunction. A 2012 GAPP2 (Global Attitude of Patients and Physicians 2) survey found that 22% of insulin-using diabetic patients missed a basal insulin dose during a 30-day period. [2] There are very real dangers diabetes poses if left unchecked or mismanaged, and one of my goals today is to motivate you into taking better care of yourself or helping a loved one manage the disease better. Why is diabetes so dangerous? Because if not managed correctly, it can wreak havoc on just about every system and organ in the body. Let’s take a look at some of the biggest risks diabetic complications pose: Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition that can occur when patients neglect to take their insulin and have uncontrolled blood sugar. Since insulin is necessary to break down glucose as a sourc Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

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