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How Can Ketosis Be Prevented

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Proof That Ketogenic Diets Increase Nad+ To Curb Inflammation And Prevent Brain Degeneration

Proof That Ketogenic Diets Increase Nad+ To Curb Inflammation And Prevent Brain Degeneration

Ketogenic diets — extreme low-carbohydrate, high-fat regimens that have long been known to benefit epilepsy and other neurological illnesses — may work by lowering inflammation in the brain, according to new research by UC San Francisco scientists. The UCSF team has discovered a molecular key to the diet’s apparent effects, opening the door for new therapies that could reduce harmful brain inflammation following stroke and brain trauma by mimicking the beneficial effects of an extreme low-carb diet New research uncovers and replicates the mechanism by which a ketogenic diet curbs brain inflammation. The findings pave the way for a new drug target that could achieve the same benefits of a keto diet without having to actually follow one. The keto diet is focused on reducing the amount of carbohydrates as much as possible and increasing the amount of protein and fat. Besides its weight loss-related benefits, recent studies have pointied to many other advantages. For instance, Medical News Today recently covered research suggesting that the diet may increase longevity and improve memory in old age. Other studies have noted the neurological benefits of the diet. The keto diet is used to treat epilepsy, and some have suggested that it may prove helpful in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. However, the mechanism by which a keto diet may benefit the brain in these illnesses has been a mystery. The new research – which was led by Dr. Raymond Swanson, a professor of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco – suggests that it may do so by reducing brain inflammation. In the new study, Dr. Swanson and team show the molecular process by which the keto diet reduces brain inflammation. The researchers also identify a key protein that, if blocked, could Continue reading >>

Preventing Seizures With The Ketogenic Diet

Preventing Seizures With The Ketogenic Diet

Since the 1920s, doctors have known that a special diet may help control epilepsy seizures in children who don't respond to drug treatments. It’s called a ketogenic diet because it produces substances known as ketones in the urine, a sign that the body is burning fat. In fact, many of the metabolic changes associated with this epilepsy diet are similar to those that occur during starvation. No one knows why a diet like this controls seizures, but numerous studies have documented its effectiveness. Treating Seizures With the Ketogenic Diet Today, experts may recommend the ketogenic diet for children who have tried at least two kinds of medication without success, have had intolerable medication side effects, or have seizures that are very frequent or severe. For children who do not respond to other epilepsy treatments, “it’s worthwhile to try,” says Jacqueline French, MD, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. About two-thirds of those who try the ketogenic diet improve noticeably or even become seizure-free. Children who start the diet while taking medication usually must stay on the drugs, at least initially, although there is the possibility that they can reduce the dosage once the diet starts to have an effect. Eventually, some children can discontinue their epilepsy medication completely. Ketogenic Diet Specifics Basically, 80 to 90 percent of the calories in the diet come from high-fat foods, with protein making up most of the remaining calories, and a very small amount from carbohydrates. Total calories are restricted to about 75 percent of the recommended daily allowance for the patient’s age group. Before starting the ketogenic diet, the child fasts for 24 hours in the hospital under medical supervision. Th Continue reading >>

Eating Fat, Lifting Cows, And Preventing Seizures — An Intro To The Ketogenic Diet (with Dom D’agostino)

Eating Fat, Lifting Cows, And Preventing Seizures — An Intro To The Ketogenic Diet (with Dom D’agostino)

Eating Fat, Lifting Cows, and Preventing Seizures — An Intro to the Ketogenic Diet (with Dom D’Agostino) We’re about to dive into the world of ketosis with Dominic D’Agostino. But, to get there, we must first rewind the clock and start where Dom began. There’s a problem. We’re asked to solve it. Navy SEALs divers are getting uncontrollable seizures from oxygen toxicity during their dives. How can we prevent this? We scour the research. Eventually, we find an interesting study. Fasting is an effective treatment for seizures. In fact, it may be the MOST effective treatment for seizures. But fasting is only a short-term solution. We need something more sustainable. We read about the Ketogenic Diet. It mimics the effects of fasting without the undesired downside of starvation. Hmm… Enter The Ketogenic Diet Before us sits this Keto chest. In it lies the promise to prevent seizures. We walk to it, slowly reach for it’s handle, and pull open it’s top. We find more than we expected. Weird-sounding words. Articles with conflicting statements. Studies that only Harvard-graduated PhDs could understand. Most people would quit here. It’s just too much — too much jargon. Too much complicated science. Too much of an unfinished puzzle. There are other pressing matters to attend to. But we carry on. As we organize all the things that came flying out of the chest, we realize that our search for seizure prevention has opened a door to something with much broader implications. Something bigger even than cat pictures. We learn that the Ketogenic Diet is best known as an effective treatment for epilepsy, but early research shows data that supports further investigation in all these other areas as well: Cancer Alzheimer’s Parkinson’s Diabetes Brain Injury Metabolic S Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Migraines?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Migraines?

The auras, debilitating pain, nausea, and sensitivity to noise and light means that migraine sufferers will do almost anything to ward off a migraine. Several recent studies exploring the potential of a ketogenic diet show anecdotal promise of less-frequent attacks, but aren’t yet conclusive. What is a Ketogenic Diet? Sometimes referred to as “Atkins Light” or “The Bacon Diet,” a ketogenic diet is a diet that is low carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high fat. Typical macronutrients for someone on a ketogenic diet is 5% carbs, 25% protein, and 75% fat (yes, you read that right), with the actual amount of grams and calories consumed dependent on the individual’s needs. As Laura West, migraine sufferer and author of the blog @MigraineKetoTherapy explains “it seemed very simple: eat a lot of fat, moderate protein, and as few carbs as possible. The fact is, it really is that simple. Follow those basic principles and sooner or later you will find yourself in a state of ketosis, in which you are fueling your body primarily with fat instead of carbohydrates. Burning fat for fuel produces ketone bodies that help prevent the build up of glutamate in the brain that wreaks havoc on the brains of many of us migraine sufferers.” One doctor is downright bullish on the potential of a ketogenic diet for migraines: “We’ve only just begun to see glimpses of the therapeutic potential of ketogenic diets beyond the treatment of epilepsy, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimers, Parkinsons, etc.), obesity, and migraine” predicts Dr. Josh Turknett, neurologist and author of The Migraine Miracle*. Proven Medical Success for Epilepsy For years now, doctors have been prescribing a ketogenic diet to patients who suffer from epilepsy, as it has been shown t Continue reading >>

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

A few months ago, I read a book called The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Living. The authors are two of the world's leading researchers on low-carb diets. Dr. Jeff S. Volek is a Registered Dietitian and Dr. Stephen D. Phinney is a medical doctor. These guys have performed many studies and have treated thousands of patients with a low-carb diet. According to them, there are many stumbling blocks that people tend to run into, which can lead to adverse effects and suboptimal results. To get into full-blown ketosis and reap all the metabolic benefits of low-carb, merely cutting back on the carbs isn't enough. If you haven't gotten the results you expected on a low-carb diet, then perhaps you were doing one of these 5 common mistakes. There is no clear definition of exactly what constitutes a "low carb diet." Some would call anything under 100-150 grams per day low-carb, which is definitely a lot less than the standard Western diet. A lot of people could get awesome results within this carbohydrate range, as long as they ate real, unprocessed foods. But if you want to get into ketosis, with plenty of ketoness flooding your bloodstream to supply your brain with an efficient source of energy, then this level of intake may be excessive. It could take some self experimentation to figure out your optimal range as this depends on a lot of things, but most people will need to go under 50 grams per day to get into full-blown ketosis. This doesn't leave you with many carb options except vegetables and small amounts of berries. If you want to get into ketosis and reap the full metabolic benefits of low-carb, going under 50 grams of carbs per day may be required. Protein is a very important macronutrient, which most people aren't getting enough of. It can improve satiety and incr Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?

There are always brand new diets promising unprecedented results and life-changing health. Some of them turn out to be really good, and some are later proved to be very unhealthy. It can be hard to know what to believe. But the ketogenic diet has been around a long time and has promising results. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet aimed at achieving the highest functioning mind and body possible. Studies show a ketogenic diet can slow and even reverse symptoms of memory loss and cognitive impairment throughout all the dementia stages. So what exactly is a ketogenic diet? As said above, it’s a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carb diet that produces ketones – compounds the body can use to produce energy. In many studies ketones have been found to be neuroprotective, meaning they defend your brain from degenerating. In other words, a ketogenic diet is a great way to reverse Alzheimer’s or dementia naturally. As research shows, there is a strong link between blood sugar disorders and various stages of dementia, including memory loss and Alzheimer’s. The link between insulin resistance and diabetes is so high that Alzheimer’s has sometimes been called “type 3 diabetes”. The human body wasn’t designed to consume a diet so full of sweets, starchy foods, breads, and pastas. Underlying the accumulation of excessive body fat is a far more dangerous situation: the degeneration of our brains, which leads to memory loss, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Because glucose and insulin mechanisms in the brain are so impaired by the time one enters into the dementia stages, a ketogenic diet can be a great natural cure for Alzheimer’s as it can slow or even reverse symptoms. This is because the brain is now burning ketones for Continue reading >>

Do Keto Supplements Really Help Prevent Ailments & Diseases?

Do Keto Supplements Really Help Prevent Ailments & Diseases?

What is a ketogenic diet? This is a diet that is high in fat, low in carbs and moderate in protein. Most people have adopted this diet as a weight loss mechanism as well as an aid to fight and prevent most diseases. It is an effective way to lower blood sugar in diabetes, optimize cholesterol and control insulin resistance. Research shows that using these specific supplements can benefit both your diet and health. But is this true? Do these supplements really help prevent illnesses and diseases? Let’s find out. Effects of Ketogenic Supplements on Diseases The ketogenic diet is known to increase the body’s ability to fight diseases such as cancer, epilepsy and diabetes type 2 among others. However, do these supplements have the same effects on the body? 1. Hydroxymethybutyrate (HMB) This is a BHB salt, a popular keto supplement that is excellent at minimizing catabolic period before that state that you are looking for, is achieved in the body. Does it fight and prevent illnesses? Lets see. This supplement has been tested and proven to be involved in muscle protein synthesis. When taken orally in combination with amino acids, this it has shown that it can prevent loss of muscle in patients with AIDS, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. Clinical evidence shows that HMB lowers cholesterol and blood pressure reducing effects of hypertension. HMB supplements reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors, reduce systolic blood pressure and lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. This supplement has been tested and proven to increase insulin sensitivity which results in lower insulin levels, faster descent into deeper state and higher glucagon. It prevents some kinds of cell damage in the body and helps to restore the levels of vitamin C and vitamin E For diabetes patie Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does alcohol stop ketosis? What happens if you eat more fat than your body needs? And will a slightly higher carb intake kick you out of ketosis? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Alcohol stopping ketosis? We are trying to get into ketosis and measuring blood ketones which seem to be sitting around 1.0 mmol/L. We have adjusted and readjusted our protein and carb amounts to be within the limits you suggest. Last night I had three vodkas – being no-carb alcohol, can this still affect ketosis levels or would we be doing something else wrong? Thank you, Meg Alcohol should not have any major effect on ketosis, as long as it’s no-carb alcohol like vodka (without sweet ingredients in a drink of course). If anything, pure alcohol tends to somewhat increase ketosis. For best results choose low-carb alcoholic drinks like wine or other low-carb drinks, see the guide below. Also note that many people get more sensitive to alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Be careful and never drink and drive, this is especially true on keto. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt If I eat more fat than my body needs for fuel, what happens to the excess? I understand that if one eats more carbs (glucose) and/or protein than one’s body can immediately use, the excess can be stored as fat. What happens to dietary fat if one eats more of it than can be used? Is it, too, stored, or does the body excrete it? Kathleen It’s mostly stored, though there may be a slight increase in calories burned on low carb. Don’t eat when you’re not hungry, and this should not really be an issue on a low-carb diet, as fat is very satiating. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Will going moderate low carb >50 carbs turn brain back to using carbs for fuel instead of ketones? I think I need to up carbs for energy. I e Continue reading >>

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

A lot of people are confused by the term “ketosis.” You may read that it is a “dangerous state” for the body, and it does sound abnormal to be “in ketosis.” But ketosis merely means that our bodies are using fat for energy. Ketones (also called ketone bodies) are molecules generated during fat metabolism, whether from the fat in the almonds you just ate or fat you were carrying around your middle. When our bodies are breaking down fat for energy, most of it gets converted to energy, but ketones are also produced as part of the process. When people eat less carbohydrates, their bodies turn to fat for energy, so it makes sense that more ketones are generated. Some of those ketones (acetoacetate and ß-hydroxybutyrate) are used for energy; the heart muscle and kidneys, for example, prefer ketones to glucose. Most cells, including the brain cells, are able to use ketones for at least part of their energy. Is ketosis a bad thing? There is an assumption that if a body is burning a lot of fat for energy, it must not be getting “enough” glucose. However, there is no indication, from studying people on reduced carbohydrate diets, that this is the case (though there is usually a short period of adjustment, less than a week, in most cases). It takes about 72 hours to burn up all of the reserve glycogen (sugar loads). Although it’s true that our bodies can’t break fat down directly into glucose (though, interestingly, they easily use glucose to make fat), our bodies can convert some of the protein we eat into glucose. Indeed, this works well for people who don’t tolerate a lot of sugar, because this conversion happens slowly so it doesn’t spike blood glucose. What is the danger of ketosis? It is important that if you are following a ketogenic nutritional pro Continue reading >>

Preventive Strategies For Ketosis

Preventive Strategies For Ketosis

Parturition and the onset of lactation challenges calcium and energy homeostasis in dairy cows predisposing them to periparturient disorders that affect health, production and reproductive performance says Carlos Risco, DVM, Dipl. ACT, University of Florida. Dairy cattle experience a negative carbohydrate balance, from -3 weeks and + 3 weeks from calving and are at risk to develop ketosis, Risco explained at the 2010 Western Veterinary Conference. Milk production, in particular, drives the high requirements for glucose because other fuels cannot substitute for lactose in milk. To counteract this, the cow mobilizes body fat and protein stores in the form of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and amino acids. This promotes gluconeogenesis and occurs under the influence of low serum concentrations of insulin. Volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, butyrate [BHBA]) produced in the rumen are also presented to the liver as fuels. Acetate and butyrate are ketogenic, and propionate is glycogenic. The key to prevention of ketosis is to maximize dry matter intake before and after calving to prevent excessive NEFA mobilization. Preventing ketosis in the first place is key to avoid some post-partum issues. Risco outlined some preventive strategies: The transition ration. To prevent ketosis the transition ration should maximize DMI, provide adequate energy density, and minimize ketogenic precursors. Silage with a high butyric acid content should not be fed. Introduce ration changes gradually. Manage transition cows to maximize DMI, e.g., provide adequate bunk space. Avoid over-conditioning of cows in late lactation and the early dry period. Niacin (nicotinic acid) fed in transition rations at 6–12 g /d may help reduce blood ketone levels. Propylene glycol may be administered pr Continue reading >>

Can Overeating Prevent Ketosis?

Can Overeating Prevent Ketosis?

I am trying to get into ketosis and am finding it very difficult I think because I am having microbinges at almost every meal (I have a long history of doing this). Is it possible that eating too much, even if it's spoonfuls of ghee, would prevent me from entering ketosis because of blood sugar spikes or something? also, does anyone have info on damage I could be doing to my body just from overeating...like is it stressing my body out to be in this constant overfed state? I am 5'4 112lbs and currently (over)eating at about 2000-2500cal/day, walking is my only exercise, and I have gained 5lbs in the past couple months since being more strict about eating a clean Paleo diet. I consume between 20-35g carbs/day and 35-60g protein, the rest is fat. Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Weight Loss (or Gain Muscle) On A Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

How To Prevent Weight Loss (or Gain Muscle) On A Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is becoming increasingly popular as we learn more about the potential benefits in terms of both performance and chronic disease management. However, the diet also has to be tailored to your personal goals, and we’ve previously written about some of the pitfalls for athletes using a ketogenic diet. For instance, satiety may be one of the most notable benefits of a ketogenic diet [1], which seems to provide an advantage during weight loss. But if you’re already lean and your ketogenic diet is causing you to undereat, losing lean mass can be a concern. This is important for athletes, but also for patients using a therapeutic ketogenic diet to control a chronic neurodegenerative disease, because muscle mass and strength are two of the best predictors of long-term health and mortality. Thus, the question that naturally arises is: how can I implement a ketogenic diet without losing weight? The topic of gaining or maintaining weight (specifically lean mass) on a ketogenic diet is often left out of the discussion. In fact, the following question was recently sent to the team at Nourish Balance Thrive: I just finished listening to your latest podcast. Very informative! At the end, you were asking for suggestions for possible topics. I have one: the combination of ketosis and an ectomorphic body type: issues for people like myself who don't want to lose weight or outright cannot afford to but want to apply ketosis for other reasons. In my particular case, it is a neurodegenerative disease I'm dealing with (Parkinson's). There is quite a bit of literature indicating that a keto diet could be helpful, but my BMI varies between 19 and 20 and ketosis tends to lower that considerably. Are there things one can tweak to do keto without the weight loss, or do you t Continue reading >>

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood "villains" Of Human Metabolism

Go to: The Ketone Bodies are an Important Fuel The hormonal changes associated with a low carbohydrate diet include a reduction in the circulating levels of insulin along with increased levels of glucagon. This activates phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-biphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase and also inhibits pyruvate kinase, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase, and glucokinase. These changes indeed favor gluconeogenesis. However, the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis. In the liver in the well-fed state, acetyl CoA formed during the β-oxidation of fatty acids is oxidized to CO2 and H2O in the citric acid cycle. However, when the rate of mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue is accelerated, as, for example, during very low carbohydrate intake, the liver converts acetyl CoA into ketone bodies: Acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. The liver cannot utilize ketone bodies because it lacks the mitochondrial enzyme succinyl CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase required for activation of acetoacetate to acetoacetyl CoA [3]. Therefore, ketone bodies flow from the liver to extra-hepatic tissues (e.g., brain) for use as a fuel; this spares glucose metabolism via a mechanism similar to the sparing of glucose by oxidation of fatty acids as an alternative fuel. Indeed, the use of ketone bodies replaces most of the glucose required by the brain. Not all amino acid carbon will yield glucose; on average, 1.6 g of amino acids is required to synthesize 1 g of glucose [4]. Thus, to keep the brain supplied with glucose at rate of 110 to 120 g/day, the breakdown of 160 to 200 g of protein (close to 1 kg of muscle tissue) would be required. This is clearly undesirable, and the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis Continue reading >>

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