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How Can Ketosis Be Prevented

Do Ketogenic Diets Prevent Inflammation?

Do Ketogenic Diets Prevent Inflammation?

By Mae Chan Ketogenic diets — extreme low-carbohydrate, high-fat regimens that have long been known to benefit epilepsy and other neurological illnesses — may work by lowering inflammation in the brain, according to new research by UC San Francisco scientists. The UCSF team has discovered a molecular key to the diet’s apparent effects, opening the door for new therapies that could reduce harmful brain inflammation following stroke and brain trauma by mimicking the beneficial effects of an extreme low-carb diet. “It’s a key issue in the field — how to suppress inflammation in brain after injury,” said Raymond Swanson, MD, a professor of neurology at UC San Francisco, chief of the neurology service at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and senior author of the new study. In the paper, published in the journal Nature Communications, Swanson and his colleagues found the previously undiscovered mechanism by which a low carbohydrate diet reduces inflammation in the brain. Importantly, the team identified a pivotal protein that links the diet to inflammatory genes, which, if blocked, could mirror the anti-inflammatory effects of ketogenic diets. “The ketogenic diet is very difficult to follow in everyday life, and particularly when the patient is very sick,” Swanson said. “The idea that we can achieve some of the benefits of a ketogenic diet by this approach is the really exciting thing here.” Low-Carb Benefits The high-fat, low-carbohydrate regimen of ketogenic diets changes the way the body uses energy. In response to the shortage of carb-derived sugars such as glucose, the body begins breaking down fat into ketones and ketoacids, which it can use as alternative fuels. In rodents, ketogenic diets — and caloric restriction, in general Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Migraines?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Migraines?

The auras, debilitating pain, nausea, and sensitivity to noise and light means that migraine sufferers will do almost anything to ward off a migraine. Several recent studies exploring the potential of a ketogenic diet show anecdotal promise of less-frequent attacks, but aren’t yet conclusive. What is a Ketogenic Diet? Sometimes referred to as “Atkins Light” or “The Bacon Diet,” a ketogenic diet is a diet that is low carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high fat. Typical macronutrients for someone on a ketogenic diet is 5% carbs, 25% protein, and 75% fat (yes, you read that right), with the actual amount of grams and calories consumed dependent on the individual’s needs. As Laura West, migraine sufferer and author of the blog @MigraineKetoTherapy explains “it seemed very simple: eat a lot of fat, moderate protein, and as few carbs as possible. The fact is, it really is that simple. Follow those basic principles and sooner or later you will find yourself in a state of ketosis, in which you are fueling your body primarily with fat instead of carbohydrates. Burning fat for fuel produces ketone bodies that help prevent the build up of glutamate in the brain that wreaks havoc on the brains of many of us migraine sufferers.” One doctor is downright bullish on the potential of a ketogenic diet for migraines: “We’ve only just begun to see glimpses of the therapeutic potential of ketogenic diets beyond the treatment of epilepsy, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimers, Parkinsons, etc.), obesity, and migraine” predicts Dr. Josh Turknett, neurologist and author of The Migraine Miracle*. Proven Medical Success for Epilepsy For years now, doctors have been prescribing a ketogenic diet to patients who suffer from epilepsy, as it has been shown t Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Preventing Seizures With The Ketogenic Diet

Preventing Seizures With The Ketogenic Diet

Since the 1920s, doctors have known that a special diet may help control epilepsy seizures in children who don't respond to drug treatments. It’s called a ketogenic diet because it produces substances known as ketones in the urine, a sign that the body is burning fat. In fact, many of the metabolic changes associated with this epilepsy diet are similar to those that occur during starvation. No one knows why a diet like this controls seizures, but numerous studies have documented its effectiveness. Treating Seizures With the Ketogenic Diet Today, experts may recommend the ketogenic diet for children who have tried at least two kinds of medication without success, have had intolerable medication side effects, or have seizures that are very frequent or severe. For children who do not respond to other epilepsy treatments, “it’s worthwhile to try,” says Jacqueline French, MD, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. About two-thirds of those who try the ketogenic diet improve noticeably or even become seizure-free. Children who start the diet while taking medication usually must stay on the drugs, at least initially, although there is the possibility that they can reduce the dosage once the diet starts to have an effect. Eventually, some children can discontinue their epilepsy medication completely. Ketogenic Diet Specifics Basically, 80 to 90 percent of the calories in the diet come from high-fat foods, with protein making up most of the remaining calories, and a very small amount from carbohydrates. Total calories are restricted to about 75 percent of the recommended daily allowance for the patient’s age group. Before starting the ketogenic diet, the child fasts for 24 hours in the hospital under medical supervision. Th Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss What is Nutritional Ketosis? Ketosis is an eating plan where the body uses ketones to fuel the brain and body instead of glucose like most people use when on the SAD (standard American diet). It can be very helpful for blood sugar and consistent energy because fat is a very stable source of fuel. We all have a few million calories of fat we would gladly burn off, right? It takes a while to get into ketosis and it can be elusive if you are not paying close attention. It can be very safe for a period of time (even forever) but each person has to decide what feels compatible with their own lifestyle. Some experts do not think it is an optimal state for athletes but others experts disagree. I think we all have bio hack ourselves to see what feels right. Of course, I believe that the paleo template is good starting place for optimal health but ketosis can be an add-on or tweak for people who get stuck or feel hopeless. It can be a powerful and effective way to lose weight without hunger and many of my friends have had success with it. Always ask your doctor before beginning any new nutrition or weight loss plan. Here are some ways to make it work for you: 1. Eat Less Protein I have a made a handy dandy chart here for figuring out the right amounts for you. Most average ladies need about 50-100 grams, no more, fyi. You have to self experiment a little to find what is right for you. The idea is that protein can turn to sugar if someone eats more than they need, then the sugar spikes blood glucose encouraging fat storage. 2. Eat More Fat I used to see this all the time in clients, I say add more fat and people add a tsp of evoo to their salad, NO!!! I am talking about seeing fat as a food group not a side item. Avocad Continue reading >>

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood "villains" Of Human Metabolism

Go to: The Ketone Bodies are an Important Fuel The hormonal changes associated with a low carbohydrate diet include a reduction in the circulating levels of insulin along with increased levels of glucagon. This activates phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-biphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase and also inhibits pyruvate kinase, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase, and glucokinase. These changes indeed favor gluconeogenesis. However, the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis. In the liver in the well-fed state, acetyl CoA formed during the β-oxidation of fatty acids is oxidized to CO2 and H2O in the citric acid cycle. However, when the rate of mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue is accelerated, as, for example, during very low carbohydrate intake, the liver converts acetyl CoA into ketone bodies: Acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. The liver cannot utilize ketone bodies because it lacks the mitochondrial enzyme succinyl CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase required for activation of acetoacetate to acetoacetyl CoA [3]. Therefore, ketone bodies flow from the liver to extra-hepatic tissues (e.g., brain) for use as a fuel; this spares glucose metabolism via a mechanism similar to the sparing of glucose by oxidation of fatty acids as an alternative fuel. Indeed, the use of ketone bodies replaces most of the glucose required by the brain. Not all amino acid carbon will yield glucose; on average, 1.6 g of amino acids is required to synthesize 1 g of glucose [4]. Thus, to keep the brain supplied with glucose at rate of 110 to 120 g/day, the breakdown of 160 to 200 g of protein (close to 1 kg of muscle tissue) would be required. This is clearly undesirable, and the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis Continue reading >>

Minimizing The Risk For Ketosis In Dairy Herds

Minimizing The Risk For Ketosis In Dairy Herds

En Español: Minimizando el Riesgo de Cetosis en el Ganado Lechero This article is part of our series of original articles on emerging featured topics. Please check here to see other articles in this series. Introduction Although most cases of ketosis occur in fresh dairy cows, feeding practices and cow health prepartum can predispose cows to experiencing ketosis after calving. Most cases of primary ketosis occur within the first 2 weeks of calving, and even most secondary ketosis (occurring after the onset of another disease) occurs within the first 30 to 60 days in milk. In general, less than 5% of the cows in a herd should experience clinical ketosis. However, some reports have indicated that the incidence of subclinical ketosis may affect 40% of cows, with the incidence rate varying widely among farms, and may be as high as 80% on individual farms. The major focus prepartum to reduce the risk for ketosis after calving is maintaining feed intake in late gestation and avoiding overconditioning cows during late lactation and the dry period. Cows should dry off and freshen at a body condition score (BCS) of 3.5. Cows with a BCS equal to or greater than 4.0 will likely have lower intake prepartum and be at higher risk for fatty liver and ketosis at and after calving. Recent work at the University of Minnesota indicates that cows with a BCS greater than 3.5 and producing over 16 lb of colostrum are at a higher risk for ketosis. Feeding programs for far-off and close-up cows should be designed to maintain intake during late gestation, i.e., minimizing the drop in intake during the last week of gestation, to reduce the risk for ketosis after calving. These prepartum diets should contain high-fiber forages and provide adequate but not excessive amounts of energy. A 20% or gr Continue reading >>

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

A few months ago, I read a book called The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Living. The authors are two of the world's leading researchers on low-carb diets. Dr. Jeff S. Volek is a Registered Dietitian and Dr. Stephen D. Phinney is a medical doctor. These guys have performed many studies and have treated thousands of patients with a low-carb diet. According to them, there are many stumbling blocks that people tend to run into, which can lead to adverse effects and suboptimal results. To get into full-blown ketosis and reap all the metabolic benefits of low-carb, merely cutting back on the carbs isn't enough. If you haven't gotten the results you expected on a low-carb diet, then perhaps you were doing one of these 5 common mistakes. There is no clear definition of exactly what constitutes a "low carb diet." Some would call anything under 100-150 grams per day low-carb, which is definitely a lot less than the standard Western diet. A lot of people could get awesome results within this carbohydrate range, as long as they ate real, unprocessed foods. But if you want to get into ketosis, with plenty of ketoness flooding your bloodstream to supply your brain with an efficient source of energy, then this level of intake may be excessive. It could take some self experimentation to figure out your optimal range as this depends on a lot of things, but most people will need to go under 50 grams per day to get into full-blown ketosis. This doesn't leave you with many carb options except vegetables and small amounts of berries. If you want to get into ketosis and reap the full metabolic benefits of low-carb, going under 50 grams of carbs per day may be required. Protein is a very important macronutrient, which most people aren't getting enough of. It can improve satiety and incr Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Can The Ketogenic Diet Lead To Alzheimer’s Disease?

Can The Ketogenic Diet Lead To Alzheimer’s Disease?

The greatest medical fear of our century is not an infection, or heart disease, or even cancer. We are gradually winning all those battles. What faces us today is something much worse, something more costly, insidious, and demoralizing than anything we have seen before. It is a disease that affects the individual, the family, and the community at its essence, at the level of the self. This disease is Alzheimer’s and it is a tsunami that will overtake our healthcare system in less than 20 years. Today, it is the most expensive disease, costing at least $400 billion annually, not to mention a source of profound emotional burden and suffering to both the family and the community. It is also the fastest growing epidemic, with an 87% rise in prevalence and mortality during the last decade.[1] Currently, after hundreds of billions of dollars of clinical trials and research, there is absolutely no drug that stops or even slows down the disease process, or any medication that could save one from the clutches of this disease. Incredibly, however, we’ve had the answer to the prevention of more than 90% of Alzheimer’s in plain sight. Yes, we know how to prevent this disease. Decades of research have demonstrated that the same factors that affect the heart and other organs affect the brain. This small organ, which constitutes 2% of the body’s weight and consumes 25% of its energy, is much more susceptible to vascular risk factors, inflammatory factors, and oxidative by-products. At the same time, its capacity to grow and connect from 10 to 20,000 fold, gives it incredible restorative capacity. In our book, The Alzheimer’s Solution, we reviewed and summarized over 300 peer-reviewed articles and brought our own experience working in a comprehensive dementia clinic and condu Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?

There are always brand new diets promising unprecedented results and life-changing health. Some of them turn out to be really good, and some are later proved to be very unhealthy. It can be hard to know what to believe. But the ketogenic diet has been around a long time and has promising results. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet aimed at achieving the highest functioning mind and body possible. Studies show a ketogenic diet can slow and even reverse symptoms of memory loss and cognitive impairment throughout all the dementia stages. So what exactly is a ketogenic diet? As said above, it’s a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carb diet that produces ketones – compounds the body can use to produce energy. In many studies ketones have been found to be neuroprotective, meaning they defend your brain from degenerating. In other words, a ketogenic diet is a great way to reverse Alzheimer’s or dementia naturally. As research shows, there is a strong link between blood sugar disorders and various stages of dementia, including memory loss and Alzheimer’s. The link between insulin resistance and diabetes is so high that Alzheimer’s has sometimes been called “type 3 diabetes”. The human body wasn’t designed to consume a diet so full of sweets, starchy foods, breads, and pastas. Underlying the accumulation of excessive body fat is a far more dangerous situation: the degeneration of our brains, which leads to memory loss, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Because glucose and insulin mechanisms in the brain are so impaired by the time one enters into the dementia stages, a ketogenic diet can be a great natural cure for Alzheimer’s as it can slow or even reverse symptoms. This is because the brain is now burning ketones for Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

Paleo And Keto On The Brain

Paleo And Keto On The Brain

The Paleo and the ketogenic diets have surged in popularity over the last 15 years. But are these diets safe, and can they improve our brain health? Followers of the Paleo diet believe our genes are not evolved to properly digest the foods that have become prevalent since the agricultural revolution, such as grains, sugars, legumes, dairy products, processed oils, salt, alcohol, and coffee. Instead we should eat the way our Paleolithic ancestors did, and fill our plates with fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, roots, and meat. No research has yet looked at whether the Paleo diet can prevent cognitive decline or dementia. One study reported the Paleo diet did not improve memory in overweight, post-menopausal women when compared to the national dietary recommendations in Nordic countries (recommendations which include more carbohydrates and less fat/protein than the Paleo diet). On the other hand, preliminary studies indicate that the Paleo diet might improve measures of metabolic health, including triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels, and blood pressure—potential risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. But the Paleo diet has not been studied in many people and its long-term effects are unclear. Although it promotes eating healthy foods, some food groups are cut out, and individuals at risk for osteoporosis should avoid the diet since it may lead to calcium and vitamin D deficiency. Another diet growing in popularity is the ketogenic diet. Initially developed in the 1920s as a potential therapy for children with difficult-to-treat epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is high in fats, very low in carbs, with moderate protein. Usually, carbohydrates are our brain’s primary energy source but ketone molecules generated from fats are also a potential source Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

What mistakes are you making when it comes to your health? I know I’ve been making plenty. That’s why I’m tracking my data in this recent ketosis experiment that I’m doing. What about you? Most people think that the ketogenic diet is just “low-carb” which leads them to make many mistakes that prevent them from not reaping all of the benefits of ketosis that they could. What benefits? How about an improved immune system, increased longevity, lower inflammation, effortless weight loss, decreased hunger, reduced risk for disease and more. Read on to know the top 10 ways that people make mistakes with ketosis and how you can prevent them. 1: Not tracking protein intake By far the biggest problem with a ketogenic diet is not tracking how much protein you are eating. The far majority of people are simply eating too much lean protein, which ends up kicking them out of ketosis. Protein can turn into carbs by a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis, meaning “making new carbs.” This then spikes insulin, and reduces ketone levels. Even though you are eating super low carb, this could make your body switch back and forth between energy systems, which will lead to high levels of fatigue or “low carb flu.” The easiest way to avoid this mistake is by tracking your ketone levels to see how you respond to different amounts and different types of meat. Everyone is different, so the only way you can tell is by tracking. I “listened to my body” before and it didn’t work. I wasn’t in ketosis when I thought I was. I also thought ketosis kind of sucked. It didn’t, I was just wrong. The only way you know is by tracking. If you consume more fat with protein, it will slow this effect. So think fattier cuts of meat, and less muscle meat. But wait, are you going to Continue reading >>

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