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How Can I Increase My Fat Intake Keto?

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

I'm often asked about popular diets, so this week and next I'm covering two popular diets - the Keto Diet this week, and Whole30 next week - including the pros, cons and my take for each. I am not advocating or recommending that we all follow these programs. While these diets - or components of these diets - may be beneficial to some, my recommendation for the majority of the population is to keep it simple, streamlined, wholesome - less about hard rules with lists of do's and don't's, and more about the key fundamentals: limit added sugars and white carbs. Emphasize lean proteins. Tons of vegetables, some fruits (mostly berries), and more of an emphasis on plant based fats when possible. Find what works for your individual lifestyle, taste preferences, budget and schedule. If you do choose to try one or some of these popular diets, use it as an opportunity to help break and replace not-so-good habits, and to educate yourself and learn more about how you may respond to certain foods and ingredients so that you can make lasting behavioral changes that can stick around long after you're "off" of a particular diet plan. *** "I'm going keto." I'm hearing this more and more often. And odds are you've heard someone talk about "going keto," you've considered it yourself, or at the very least, you've seen "keto-friendly" products and recipes in stores, magazines, and social media. Keto is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, with limited protein allowed as well. As with many of these diets, healthful food selections within each of those food categories is what determines whether the diet is healthful. The keto diet's origins "Keto" is short for "ketogenic" and is a type of diet that has been used for 100-plus years for children with uncontrolled seizures. Approximately half of th Continue reading >>

Do I Need To Eat More Fat To Burn Fat – Q&a

Do I Need To Eat More Fat To Burn Fat – Q&a

Question: I’ve often seen it claimed that one needs to ‘eat fat to burn fat’ and that this is one of the advantages of low-carbohydrate diets. But, like so many myths in the diet world, I’m wondering if this is actually true. Is it? Answer: The short answer, as you might have guessed is no. Now, as always, here’s the longer answer. I suspect that the idea that one needed to eat fat to burn fat came out of a misunderstanding of some of the early literature on low-carbohydrate/high-fat/ketogenic diets (note: I’m defining a ketogenic diet here as any diet that contains less than 100 grams of dietary carbohydrate; a topic discussed in more detail in my first book The Ketogenic Diet). In those studies, there was clearly an increase in the body’s use of fat for fuel (indicated by a large scale decrease in something called the respiratory exchange ratio or RER) and I have a hunch that people assumed that it was the huge increase in dietary fat that was driving the increase in fat burning. But as I discussed in Nutrient Intake, Nutrient Storage and Nutrient Oxidation as well as in How We Get Fat, the burning (oxidation) of fat isn’t really related to fat intake per se. Rather, it’s related to carbohydrate intake. That is, the act of eating dietary fat doesn’t usually have a major impact on how much fat you burn. I say ‘not usually’ as some studies find that very high fat intakes (like 80 grams all at once) have a small effect on fat oxidation by the body. But for the most part, how much fat the body burns during the day is related primarily to carbohydrate intake, secondarily to protein intake, and almost not at all to dietary fat intake itself. Also consider that the following three conditions: Complete fasting (no food intake at all) A high-fat, low-ca Continue reading >>

Video: The First 30 Days Of Eating “high-fat” Or “keto”

Video: The First 30 Days Of Eating “high-fat” Or “keto”

We’re stepping back in time today! I’m celebrating my 1 ½ year anniversary of eating high-fat and, because I receive so many questions about making the transition, I’m reading excerpts from the journal that I kept during the 30-day transition to high-fat living. From the very beginning, I’ve focused on a grain-free, dairy-free, whole foods ketogenic approach. While my carb counts, tracking, and macros have shifted along the way, the experience I had is very similar to the experience you’ll have… minus the part about not feeling supported and screwing up a bunch. You have me, so it’ll be a lot easier! The farther I’ve gone; the more natural ketosis has felt in my body. I don’t count calories, I don’t restrict, I just eat fat and lots of it. Press “play” if you want to understand what the first 30 days of eating high-fat feels like, what you can expect and what you can look forward to. Or, if you’re curious and just want to hear me read my diary… For video transcription, scroll down. Highlights… Why listening to your body is key to your success. What to do if you don’t know how to listen to your body. Steps to eliminate keto flu before it starts. How eating too much protein can affect your blood sugar. What carb cravings mean when you’re low-carb. Resources… Watch: What to expect when you go high-fat Watch: How to heal your hormones with high-fat Watch: All about carb-ups Get a copy of my program, Fat Fueled Program & Meal Plan Save 15% with The Keto Bundle, a bundle with The Keto Beginning and Fat Fueled Programs in one! When you transitioned to eating more fat, did you have similar experiences? VIDEO TRANSCRIPTION Hey, you! I’m so happy that you stuck by to watch my video! Thank you very, very much! Today, we’re going to be chatt Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

OK, here’s the deal – I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: an extremely high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet is not for everyone. But since ketones are a preferred fuel for the heart and the diaphragm, and because a state of ketosis can give you extreme focus and cognitive performance during difficult mental tasks, a ketogenic diet can be extremely useful for endurance athletes like triathletes, distance swimmers, cyclists, marathoners, ultra-runners, etc. Problem is, there aren’t a ton of resources out there about how highly active people can actually get into a state of ketosis without… A) chugging coconut oil and MCT oil all day long, which (trust me, I’ve tried) gets boring really, really fast; or B) experiencing some pretty extreme nutrient deficiencies from a ketogenic diet gone wrong – nutrient deficiencies that really get magnified when you combine them with crazy high levels of physical activity. So in this article, author, triathlete, and ketogenic expert extraordinaire Patricia Daly is going to fill you in on how to do things the right way. Patricia just finished writing an amazing book called “Practical Keto Meal Plans For Endurance Athletes: Tips, Tricks And How To’s For Optimizing Performance Using A High Fat, Low Carb Meal Plan“, and she’s a wealth of information on this topic. Take it away, Patricia. ————————————– Maybe the title of this article scares you a little bit… …after all, if there’s so much that can “go wrong” with the ketogenic and low carb lifestyle, is it worth all the effort? Or do you think you will never “get there” and achieve nutritional ketosis because there seem to so many stumbling blocks in your way, like talk about thyroid damage, lack of energy or extreme dietary Continue reading >>

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

When embarking on a ketogenic diet for health or fat loss, finding the optimum protein intake can be very confusing for many beginners. For smooth adaptation in the transition to a ketogenic metabolism I typically guide people using a caloric spread of around 70-80% fat, 15-25% protein, and 5% carbohydrate from green fibrous vegetables – but this ratio varies for every individual and using percentages is confusing and misleading in many cases. The best way to look at macronutrients is not in percentage ratios, but in grams. The slew of bloggers and gurus spouting so much conflicting information leads many into a mental stalemate about how much protein they should be eating. This article lays out the metrics I most commonly use to quantify how much protein an individual should intake – there is no magic ratio and the needs, preferences, and goals of the individual determine the amount of protein they will likely require on their ketogenic diet which usually lies within a relatively broad range of 1-2.2g/kg (and in some cases even higher *cringe say the protein-phobic) of bodyweight or .5-1g/lb of lean body mass (Lean Body Mass equals Body Weight minus Body Fat). Myth: “Too much” protein turns immediately into sugar I almost always recommend people increase their intake of fish and seafoods in order to get the vital nutrient DHA into their central nervous system and mitochondrial membranes. We see amazing results when people opt for more fish and less red meat, which I also love, but land mammals are not nearly as nutrient dense as seafoods with their incredible levels of DHA, EPA, selenium, and iodine. Sometimes this means they will be eating more protein than they believe will allow them to be “ketogenic”, this protein-phobia can be counterproductive, which Continue reading >>

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

Reduce fat intake? On a low carb or ketogenic diet? Amy, have you done lost yo' mind? You know people use the abbreviation “LCHF,” right? And that means low carb high fat, right? I’ve heard from many, many people who are struggling to lose body fat on a low carb or ketogenic diet. And while there are many possible reasons for this, the simplest, most obvious, and most common one is, they’re eating too darn much fat. What is this madness you speak of? This is possible. It is, as they say, “a thing.” Remember: when you reduce your carbohydrate intake to the point that your body must switch over to running primarily on fat for fuel, you go from being a “sugar burner” to being a “fat burner.” But what this means is that you’re burning fat. It doesn’t mean that the fat you’re burning will automatically and unfailingly come from your love handles and thunder thighs adipose tissue (your stored body fat). It could be coming from your fatty coffee, avocado smoothie, fat bombs, or a heavier-than-you-realize hand with nuts, cheese, and ranch dressing. Bottom line: the more fat you eat, the less of a need your body has to tap into its stored fat to use for fuel. If you’re already lean and happy with your weight, this is no problem. You might need a bunch of fat just to maintain your weight. (I hate you. Lucky you.) But if you’re struggling with fat loss on low carb despite doing “all the right things” and being on-point with your diet, there’s a chance you’re simply overdoing the dietary fat. It’s true. If your carbs are very low, then insulin will be pretty low, which is what allows you to get into “fat burning mode.” But just because insulin is low doesn’t mean you’ll magically drop body fat regardless of how many calories you take Continue reading >>

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

These are the top 10 reasons you’re not losing weight on a low carb diet. A great FREE printable for the fridge and an easy reminder to stay on track. Just click on the image below to save the PDF for printing. UPDATE – watch the quick video below. No compatible source was found for this media. Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight Eating LCHF Too Many Carbohydrates – are carbs starting to sneak back into your diet? Be honest and start tracking everything using KetoDietApp. A little treat here and there adds up. Some are more carb sensitive (or insulin resistant) than others. I know that my carbs have to be around 50g/day to be feeling great and in control of my appetite. Lower than that and I will lose a little bit of weight, above that and I know my weight loss will stall. I generally go between 35-70g/day without too much tracking because I have done it for so long. Too Much Fruit – yes I use berries on my breakfast and desserts, but that is it. I allow my children to eat fruit (without gorging) as they are fit, healthy and in the normal weight range. For me, the sugar and fructose in fruit is too much. Sure, enjoy it as a treat and eat only low carb nutritent dense berries. See fruit as an occasional sweet treat. Packed with fibre, antioxidants, nutrients……… “If you are overweight, fruit is not your friend” Too much Dairy – my biggest downfall is milk. I love my lattes and flat whites. Now milk is great, full of protein and calcium, but it also contains about 5% carbs. A latte can range from 9g to 15g carbs depending on the size you choose. Most dairy such as milk, cream and yoghurt contains approximately 4- 5% but you are more likely to drink a large glass of milk, eat a bowl of yoghurt or drink a large latte than eat 250g of full fat cheese Continue reading >>

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). I personally recommend a cyclic ketogenic diet for most of my clients where you go low-carb for 3 days and then have a slightly higher carbohydrate day, followed by 3 lower carb days. This cycles the body in and out of a state of ketosis and is beneficial for hormone balance while keeping inflammatory levels very low. The biggest challenge with this nutrition plan is to get into and maintain the state of fat adaption. Here are several advanced tips to get into and maintain ketosis. 1. Stay Hydrated: This is considered a no-brainer, but is not easy to follow. We often get so busy in our day-day lives that we forget to hydrate effectively. I recommend super hydrating your system by drinking 32 oz of filtered water within the first hour of waking and another 32-48 oz of water before noon. I have most of my clients do a water fast or eat light in the morning doing smoothies or keto coffee or tea. So hydration around these dishes should be well tolerated by the digestive system. In general, aiming to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water and closer to your full body weight in ounces of water daily will help you immensely. I weigh 160 lbs and easily drink 140-180 ounces of water each day. Sometimes more in the summer time. As you begin super Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Eating fat to burn fat sounds contradictory, if not nuts, right? The world is full of people who are fat because of high-fat diets, so why would a fit person want to follow suit? I'm not talking about stuffing your face full of peanut butter cups. I'm talking about following a ketogenic diet—or, put simply, a high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diet designed to make the body burn fat for fuel. Bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, and researchers alike have found that such diets are an effective fat-loss tool. In fact, studies have shown that ketogenic diets induce numerous favorable metabolic and physiological changes, including weight loss, less oxidative stress, improved body composition, reduced inflammation, and increased insulin sensitivity.[1-4] That being said, what does the science surrounding ketogenic diets have to say about individuals looking to run faster or farther, jump higher, or improve other aspects of sports performance? Shouldn't athletes be swilling Gatorade before, during, and after their events instead of adopting a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate diet? Not necessarily. Ketogenic diets have become increasingly popular among athletes ranging from Olympic competitors to endurance runners, with good reason. Let's take a closer look at the science. What Exactly Is A Ketogenic Diet, Anyway? Ketogenic diets are very high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets.[5] The exact breakdown of the diet varies between individuals, but a general profile may reflect 70-75 percent fat, 15-20 percent protein, and only 5-10 percent carbohydrate. So, you're probably thinking, all I need to do then is watch out for the carbs, right? Not exactly. Ketogenic diets are not the same as high-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets. I often hear Continue reading >>

The Truth About High Fat Diets

The Truth About High Fat Diets

The Truth About High Fat Diets For some strange reason there has been a pendulum swing from low fat to high fat diets over the last decade. As high fat diets have become popular, there have been many claims made about the use of high fat diets and why they might be the best tool for fat loss. Let me enumerate them here in a short list: High fat diets make you burn more calories A ketogenic state makes you burn the most fat and offers a metabolic advantage Eating more fat makes your lose more fat since you are using fat for fuel Carbohydrates are stored more easily than fat. You eat less when you eat high fat meals Fat is more satiating than carbohydrates Eating fat before a meal makes you eat less. Now as science is a methodology to test hypotheses, and all of these are hypotheses and they have been tested, the data is out there. Let us see what we can learn from the data. Does Eating Fat Make You Oxidize More Fat for ATP The short answer is yes, your body adapts quite quickly and robustly to the types of foods you consume. If you eat a low-carb, high-fat diet your body will start using more fat for fuel (1,2,3,4). If you eat a low-fat, high-carb diet, your body will start using more carbohydrates for fuel. This is incredibly well documented in the literature. Here are just a few data points and studies showing this is true (1). Here is the other interesting thing, it appears that it isn’t the “high fat” that makes you burn more fat, it is the lack of carbohydrates. When you consume high fat and high carbs you don’t push the RER as much as if you just restrict carbohydrates. You also see the same effect if you eat low carb and low fat or if you are fasting (5,6,7). Carbohydrates really appear to be the main “fuel selector” (more on these details in a later a Continue reading >>

The Complete Guide To A High-fat Diet

The Complete Guide To A High-fat Diet

With the ketogenic diet, health, confidence, positive relationships, and full body strength come easily to me now. I’ve spent the last 2 and a half years developing a ketogenic approach that feels good in my body and is accessible to everyone. And, I’m sharing it all in my very first paperback publication, The Keto Diet. The Keto Diet is the practical guide to eating fat and ending food obsession to reveal vibrant health, jacked-up energy, and effortless weight loss. It provides you with all the facts, and you get to choose how to develop a ketogenic diet that works for you and your individual needs. In a state of ketosis, you go from burning sugar as energy, to burning fat. All of the fat on your body is prime for the taking. You become a fat-burning machine, leading to so much more than just weight loss. But here’s the thing… the standard ketogenic approach didn’t work for me. And, it may not work for you either. Instead of throwing in the towel, I encourage you to stick with it and use The Keto Diet as a template for your impending success. Within its pages, The Keto Diet provides more than 125 paleo-friendly, ketogenic recipes with a focus on encouraging a state of ketosis through its resource bundle of meal plans, how-to guides, food preparation techniques, and everyday solutions. The 300 pages of guides and illustrations take the guesswork out of high-fat living, making following a ketogenic diet a breeze, no matter your time constraints, budget, or inner reservations surrounding increased fat intake may be. Too many ketogenic programs, books, and guides tell you what to do, instead of encouraging you to do what’s right for you. With The Keto Diet, you’ll be shown how to maintain a state of fat burning without guilt or restriction, two things that of Continue reading >>

Is It Necessary To Include High Fat Intake In A Ketosis Diet, Or Is It Just A Convenience, Because Isn’t The Idea To Burn One’s Body Fat To Make Up For The Lesser Caloric Intake?

Is It Necessary To Include High Fat Intake In A Ketosis Diet, Or Is It Just A Convenience, Because Isn’t The Idea To Burn One’s Body Fat To Make Up For The Lesser Caloric Intake?

Hi, It is actually necessary to include more healthy fat in your diet if you want to follow keto diet. It is one of the major differences between low-carb diet and ketogenic diet. (low-carb diet does not emphasize on eating more fat while ketogenic diet does) Ketogenic diet is a diet that is high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and 5-10% of calories from carbs. In other words, the fat-protein-carbs ratio should be around 7:2:1. You can include more healthy fat by eating more: Coconut oil Olive oil Avocado Organic butter Nuts (Almonds, Walnuts, Cashews…) Seeds (Flaxseeds, Chia seeds…) Cheese If you want to learn more about Keto diet, you can read my blog post where I listed all useful resources of ketogenic diet. Here’s the link: I would suggest that you watch all those videos to better understand how human body works when following a keto diet, and get a well-rated cookbook to get started. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: How To Become Fat Adapted

Ketogenic Diet: How To Become Fat Adapted

Becoming Fat Adapted: Ketones and Fat Intake The obvious first step to being fat adapted is to cut out sugar, and when I say sugar, I also mean starch. Complex carbohydrates are just glucose molecules hooked together in a long chain. The digestive tract breaks them down into glucose, AKA sugar. Therefore, a diet filled with “safe starches” like sweet potatoes is still considered a sugary diet. To become fat adapted, you need to start using ketones for energy instead of glucose. When you do this, you will become a fat burning machine! So, what are ketones? Ketones are a byproduct of fat oxidation that are basically super-fuel for your body. They are the fuel your body uses when you are fat adapted. Sounds great, right? Ketones are created in the liver during beta-oxidation. Fatty acids are broken down into acetyl-CoA, which is then oxidized, and its energy is used for the production of ATP, the coenzyme used as an energy carrier in the cells of all known organisms — the body’s energy source. If excess acetyl-CoA is produced or inadequate quantities of a required precursor called oxaloacetate are present, the extra acetyl-CoA is transformed into ketone bodies. When are you are fat adapted, you can actually produce ketones and oxidize fat for ATP at the same time. Fun fact: we all naturally go through a mild ketosis (keto-adapted) after fasting during a long night of sleep, if you don’t eat right before bed and after you’ve woken up. You need to not eat for over ten hours to be in mild ketosis. How can I become fat adapted and start producing ketones? To start producing ketones, my first suggestion is to start with a diet of less than 10 grams of carbohydrates a day. This may seem like an awful battle that you can’t win, but it really isn’t that hard to do. Continue reading >>

Maintaining Healthy State Of Ketosis.

Maintaining Healthy State Of Ketosis.

Key takeaways from eating a diet of 70% fat for 30 days. My aim is to encourage you to experiment with your own diet and discover healthier eating habits. When is just as important as what. I got fat eating healthy food. I always assumed eating quality, unprocessed, whole foods makes for a healthy eating lifestyle. But as I ate my way from country-to-country in Southeast Asia, I began to notice pound-after-pound being added to my belly. Kind of strange seeing as I’m price-insensitive to food, cook most my meals and workout often. Sup with that!? Ben might know… As fate would have it, he was in the process of experimenting with the Ketogenic Diet. As he explained to me what he learned, I envied his embodied understanding of how each macronutrient delivers a different form of energy to the body. Say no more … I’m an energy freak, in all aspects. Energy is, and creates, life. So I committed 30 days to the Keto Diet to learn what was somehow skip over in all my health classes: how foods are converted into energy and effects our body. Ketosis in a Nutshell When our body converts food into energy the go-to source is carbohydrates, which break down to glucose. However, our body has evolved to only store a finite amount of glucose (give or take 1600 calories). So after our body is depleted of carbohydrates it needs another source of fuel. So it resorts to fat, which break down into ketone bodies. Ketosis then is a metabolic state in which our body derives energy from fat. And glycolysis is when our body is deriving energy from carbs. So if you eliminate carbohydrates from your diet, your body will enjoy burning both consumed and stored fat for energy. Muscle is spared and fat is burned, that’s ketosis! Our ancestors were big fans of ketosis. In fact, their survival de Continue reading >>

How To Add More Fat To Your Low Carb Diet For Nutritional Ketosis

How To Add More Fat To Your Low Carb Diet For Nutritional Ketosis

Lately, the interwebs have been buzzing with Jimmy Moore’s summer 2012 weight loss success after tweaking his macronutrient ratios. I have been on the edge of my seat waiting to see how he did it. He is basing his new refined low carb diet on the advice from the great book The Art and Science of Low Carb Performance by Dr. Phinney and Dr. Volek. Just like Jimmy, many long time low carbers and nutrition enthusiasts have tried various methods – thyroid/adrenal protocols, parasite cleanses, homeopathy, HCG diets, colonics/enema’s, Leptin resets, green juices, bone broth diets, probiotics, meditation, EFT, positive thinking, HITT training, Slow Burn, Crossfit – you name it. We can all relate to his struggle of “doing everything right” but not losing weight. Maybe Jimmy Moore, Dr. Phinney and Dr. Volek have found the missing link to the low carb weight loss puzzle: restricting protein? Jimmy’s success in losing weight has given us all hope that if he can do it, maybe we can also bust through our own personal plateaus. Is monitoring protein and increasing fat the answer to low carb weight loss stalls? It is worth a shot and it can’t hurt to try, as long we make sure to eat the highest quality fats. Read my article about which fats are healthy to eat here: Which Fats Are Healthy at GrassFedGirl.com. Please make sure and eat the right fats or you will not succeed long term on a low carb diet. Protein free for all: I came into low carb and paleo in the summer of 2010, and have always eaten plenty of protein and fat without worrying about percentages. This lifestyle has kept my weight stable, tamed my autoimmune condition and helped me regulate my blood sugar but I would love to lose a few extra pounds (who wouldn’t?). I have seen Paleo and low carb work wonders Continue reading >>

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