diabetestalk.net

Honey Ketosis Sleep

The Ketogenic Diet Is The Latest Buzzy Weight-loss Plan—here’s What A Day Of Eating Actually Looks Like

The Ketogenic Diet Is The Latest Buzzy Weight-loss Plan—here’s What A Day Of Eating Actually Looks Like

A nutrition expert shares three keto recipes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. There's no question the ketogenic diet, or keto diet, is generating tons of buzz these days, with more than 4 million #keto posts on Instagram and counting. Though you may already know the basics of this high-fat, low-carb eating style, you may be less familiar with actual keto recipes, and what a typical day on the ketogenic diet really looks like. Enter nutrition and fitness expert Mark Sisson and his new book, The Keto Reset Diet ($28, amazon.com), a 21-day plan to achieve ketosis—or the state in which your body is burning fat (instead of carbs) as its primary source of fuel. “Most of us only know how to burn sugar, and we have to refill the tank every couple of hours—that’s where the cravings and constant hunger come in," Sisson explained in an interview with Health. His "reset" program is designed to relieve you of that need for a regular dose of carbs. "One of the biggest benefits of going keto is a dramatic mitigation of hunger and cravings,” he says. That's just one of many benefits of the ketogenic diet, according to its fans. Sisson lists a slew of other health perks, including more energy, greater clarity of thought, better sleep, a reduction in inflammation, and "a trend toward one’s ideal body composition." The ketogenic diet involves cutting your carbs down to 50g per day (about the amount in a bagel), which may seem daunting. But even doing it short term can have perks, says Sisson. “You don’t have to stay in ketosis forever to reap the benefits of this metabolic efficiency,” he says. “I’m not suggesting that people adopt a keto lifestyle for the rest of their days. Do it to reset your metabolism, gain the metabolic flexibility, and you can get long-term b Continue reading >>

Discovering Ketosis – How To Effectively Lose Weight

Discovering Ketosis – How To Effectively Lose Weight

What do you think will happen to your weight if you combine a ketogenic diet with intermittent fasting? That’s what Ariel Faigon wanted to find the answer to – and judging by the graph above, the answer seems to be very effective weight loss over time. GitHub: Discovering Ketosis: How to Effectively Lose Weight Faigon tracked a number of different factors to determine what the most important ones for weight loss were. So what are some of his insights? That carbs and no sleep equals weight gain. On the other hand, low-carb, high-fat foods and sleep cause weight loss. And the greatest obstacle to achieving weight loss is the carb-craving monster. In order to stay on top of it, Faigon offers this advice: Eat avocados, olive oil, mayo, coconut oil, nuts. I never worry about natural fat, I eat as much fat as I want. This is what makes it much easier to avoid carbs. What do you think – is a ketogenic diet plus intermittent fasting (and getting enough sleep) the most effective way to lose excess weight? Or is Faigon missing something important? Try it A Quick Guide to Ketogenic Diets Low Carb for Beginners How to Lose Weight Intermittent Fasting for Beginners Top videos about ketosis Top videos about intermittent fasting Continue reading >>

#147: Ketosis And Your Brain

#147: Ketosis And Your Brain

There was a time not so long ago when nutrition was simple: carbs good, fats bad. But since this neat summary was from the same people who told us to eat more margarine and fewer eggs, well, let’s just say that advice wasn’t the most accurate. Welcome to the ketogenic diet. A high fat, low carb diet based on how our ancestors probably ate, it can control epilepsy, help you get a leaner body, and make your thinking clearer and sharper. Dr. Dominic D’Agostino, Associate Professor of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida and Senior Research Scholar at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC), is here to talk to us about what exactly is going on in your body on a ketogenic diet. The Evolution of Human Diets When you think about how our caveman ancestors lived, they didn’t have access to a glut of high glycemic load foods like ripe fruit or honey, and they definitely weren’t snacking on white bread. They were eating a diet high in fiber and fat, and low in carbs. They were also probably in ketosis for most of the year. Cognitive Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet When your body is in ketosis, your brain just works better: you’ll feel more lucid and sharp. Like so much about the brain, we don’t know exactly why this is. But from an evolutionary perspective, it makes sense. If you haven’t been successful in getting food, it’s time to make a new plan, and you more likely come up with a successful one if your thinking is clear and sharp. Getting into Ketosis Ketosis is a metabolic state in which your brain and body’s energy comes from ketone bodies, instead of from glucose. There are a few ways of pushing your body into ketosis, including sustained periods of fasting and following a ketogenic diet (as the name so obvio Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Athletic Performance: More Than Fat Loss

Ketosis And Athletic Performance: More Than Fat Loss

The above video is a presentation by Peter Attia, M.D. His talk is somewhat technical, but I always write blog posts hoping 20,000 people will *love* them, not that 1,000,000 will *like* them. In this presentation, you will learn (in my words, not Pete’s): – More about nutrition than most MDs learn in med school. – How ketosis-adapted performance can aid fat loss and high-altitude resilience. – Why the calorie estimates on treadmills and stationary bikes are complete BS. – The three primary systems of energy production and basic organic chemistry, both of which aid understanding of all athletics. Even if you struggle a little with vocabulary, the first 30 minutes are well worth watching a few times. This talk made me immediately want to jump back on the Cyclical (or “Cyclic”) Ketogenic Diet (CKD), which was conceptually introduced to me in 1996-1998 by the writing of Lyle McDonald, Dr. Mauro Di Pasquale, and the late Dan Duchaine. It’s incredible for simultaneous fat loss and lean muscle gain, though perhaps needlessly complicated for non-athletes. I usually limited the carb-reloading period to 12-18 hours after a glycogen depletion workout on Saturdays, though I experimented with moderate Wed night carb-ups while training for sports like kickboxing. If you’ve experimented with ketosis, what was your approach and experience? Pros and cons? For additional reading, I suggest the following posts by Dr. Attia: ### Odds and Ends: This week, I’m using my birthday to change the world with @charitywater. Please click here to take a look. You could do the same. Please check out Tribe of Mentors, my newest book, which shares short, tactical life advice from 100+ world-class performers. Many of the world's most famous entrepreneurs, athletes, investors, poker p Continue reading >>

Will This Kick Me Out Of Ketosis?

Will This Kick Me Out Of Ketosis?

A common question people have when starting keto is “will this kick me out of ketosis?” I’m going to address as many items as I can think of and explain why it will or will not kick you out of keto. This is going to be as comprehensive as possible so either use ctrl + f to find what you’re looking for or buckle up and read on. How do humans enter ketosis in the first place? Things will become much more clear if we explain how humans enter ketosis. Mainly, liver glycogen is what determines if ketones will be produced. Specifically, glycogen in the liver signals malonyl-coa to be formed by carboxylating acetyl-coa. Acetyl-coa is used in many processes and it’s the main substrate used to be turned into ketones. The wiki on regulation of ketogenesis which applies to this scenario says “When the body has no free carbohydrates available, fat must be broken down into acetyl-CoA in order to get energy. Acetyl-CoA is not being recycled through the citric acid cycle because the citric acid cycle intermediates (mainly oxaloacetate) have been depleted to feed the gluconeogenesis pathway, and the resulting accumulation of acetyl-CoA activates ketogenesis.” Basically, when there is more acetyl-CoA than oxaloacetate, the acetyl-CoA becomes acetoacetate, a ketone body. In plain English, carbs provide oxaloacetate, so if it doesn’t have carbs, it likely isn’t going to kick you out of ketosis. I’ll state the exceptions later. Why do humans enter ketosis so readily? Humans enter ketosis faster than any animal on the planet. It usually takes 24-36 hours before we enter ketosis.This is because we have huge brains and tiny bodies. Our brains need ~400 calories/day, which for most people that equates to 20% of our total energy demands. To put this in perspective, most anim Continue reading >>

53 Effective Ways To Fall And Stay Asleep (even For The Worst Insomniac)

53 Effective Ways To Fall And Stay Asleep (even For The Worst Insomniac)

I used to have terrible insomnia, but after overcoming HPA axis activation and excessive inflammation, I now sleep great. I have also helped over 1,000 clients, over 80% of which have sleep issues. Check out my new book Biohacking Insomnia for a practical and comprehensive guide to overcoming insomnia and poor sleep quality. Contents Approximately 30% of the general population suffers from insomnia. According to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), almost six out of ten Americans report having insomnia and sleep problems at least a few nights a week (R). I used to have terrible insomnia. I realize now that it was caused by HPA activation as a result of inflammation. This would derange my circadian rhythm and I’d make it worse by staying up late often. I also had general anxiety about life and this would keep me up as well. I’ve been sleep-hacking for years and this list has been the product of years of experimentation. I don’t utilize all of these tools simply because I don’t need to anymore. But I have them if need be. I try to always do the minimum that is effective. I have not seen anyone implement these tips and still not be able to fall asleep. There are two main types of sleep that are responsible for the vast majority of cognitive and health benefits of sleep. These are slow wave and REM sleep. Combined they make up 40-45% of sleep. Slow Wave Sleep is the part of your sleep that is known as deep sleep. It’s also called Delta wave sleep or stage 3 sleep because it’s the third stage of non-REM sleep. It makes up about 20% of total sleep time (R). Slow-wave sleep is considered important to consolidate new memories. Slow-wave sleep improves episodic, memory (R). The primary function of slow-wave sleep may be to allow the brain to recover from its daily ac Continue reading >>

Mix These 2 Things Before Bed And Never Wake Up Tired Again!

Mix These 2 Things Before Bed And Never Wake Up Tired Again!

Have you ever woken up after several hours of sleep to find yourself still groggy? I have. It’s intuitive to think that a long sleep should leave you feeling regenerated and refreshed but in reality, it’s not just about the amount of time you spend asleep; it’s about the quality of that sleep as well. A study done by the Sleep Foundation found that although the average American sleeps for 7 hours and 36 minutes each night, 35% report their sleep quality as ‘poor’ or ‘only fair.’ 20% of the Americans surveyed said they did not wake up feeling refreshed during the week prior to the study. The Solution: Honey & Himalayan Salt In addition to a variety of lifestyle changes you can make to increase your sleep quality, honey and himalayan salt can work wonders for making sure you get a deep sleep each night. All you’ll need are 5 teaspoons of honey and one teaspoon of Himalayan salt. Mix the two together and store in a glass jar. When you’re ready to go to sleep, take one spoonful of the mixture and place it under your tongue. Let it dissolve naturally. Himalayan salt contains about 84 minerals and trace minerals, one of which is magnesium. Magnesium works by reducing the amount of cortisol – the stress hormone – in your brain, allowing you to relax and get a deep sleep. The raw honey is no slouch either; it supports your body as you sleep and helps heal your liver as well as various cells in your body. According to Health, Wild and Free: “Taking a spoonful of raw honey before sleep supplies your liver with glycogen storage when supports your liver in detoxification, circulation, hormone regulation and other functions to restore your body during rest. Additionally raw honey also contributes to melatonin being released in the brain which is an important Continue reading >>

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Fat makes your meals more palatable and helps you feel full, so it’s no wonder the high-fat ketogenic diet is increasing in popularity. The diet has been trending for the past three years, as “keto” blogs and cookbooks continue to pop up and build an impressive fan base. This diet has been used under close supervision by physicians and dietitians since the 1920s for treating epilepsy and has shown promise in managing brain cancer. But is it useful and healthy as a strategy for weight loss? First, the basics: On the ketogenic diet, at least 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Five to 10 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates (20 to 50 grams a day). The rest, up to 25 percent of your daily energy, comes from protein. By contrast, the healthy diet recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 45 to 65 percent carbs, 20 to 35 percent fat and 10 to 35 percent protein. The ketogenic diet’s low-carb target can be met only by avoiding grains, dairy products, fruit, and legumes such as chickpeas and lentils. Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash are out, and even amounts of lower-carb vegetables are limited. So what’s left to eat? Typically, eggs cooked in butter for breakfast; for lunch and dinner, meat, chicken or fish with salad or green vegetables and plenty of oily dressing. Sorry folks, no alcohol on this diet. Even red wine is out. The ketogenic diet gets its name from a process called ketosis. Ketosis happens when your body doesn’t have enough energy from glucose (carbohydrates), so it adapts by using stored fat for energy. The result? Weight loss. Does the ketogenic diet lead to faster or more sustainable weight loss than other diets? The research to date suggests that initial weight loss on the keto diet is impressive but Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner’s Guide

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner’s Guide

I’m about to embark on my 3rd time starting a ketogenic diet. I see great results every time I get back to doing keto and I thought I would share this awesome article by my friends over at Authority Nutrition. This article was originally published by Authority Nutrition and is being republished on my website with permission. I couldn’t write a better article so I’m happy they allowed me to republish it for you all. I hope that you consider this way of eating, which is very much Paleo (with the optional addition of dairy), if you need to kickstart your weight loss, like I do (again)! If you would like to use a free Ketogenic meal plan, then check out these free meal plans by I Breathe I’m Hungry or snag the Ketogenic Cookbook. The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat dietthat offers many health benefits. Over 20 studies show that this type of diet can help you lose weight and improve health (1). Ketogenic diets may even have benefits against diabetes, cancer, epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease (2, 3, 4, 5). This article is a detailed beginner’s guide to the ketogenic diet. It contains everything you need to know. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet (often termed keto) is a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares many similarities with the Atkins and low-carb diets. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. The reduction in carbs puts your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When this happens, your body becomes incredibly efficient at burning fat for energy. It also turns fat into ketones in the liver, which can supply energy for the brain (6, 7). Ketogenic diets can cause massive reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels. This, along with the increased ketones, has numerous health benefits (6, 8, 9, Continue reading >>

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be on a Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted or keto adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. It also improves cellular healing and mitochondrial biogenesis which supports stronger and healthier cells. All of this leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). Where Ketosis Can Be Extremely Beneficial There are certain cases, where I typically recommend a ketogenic diet as the research appears to support that ketosis significantly improves the functionality of these individuals. Overweight or Obese Neurodegenerative Conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Most Cancers but especially those of the brain, nervous system and blood (leukemia) Chronic Pain Seizure Disorders Non-Elite athletes or individuals looking for higher mental & physical performance The final one is the area that I and many others who have pursued a state of ketosis fall into. At this point in my life, I have no chronic diseases, I feel great 99% of the time, but I am always looking to improve my productivity and performance. I have found being in mild-ketosis to be one of the best ways to improve my energy, mental acuity, creativity, physical strength and overall life performance. There is no one diet that works perfectly for everyone. Ketosis has the potential to benefit everyone, but under unique circumstances it would not be warranted. Here are a list of special cases where long-term st Continue reading >>

How To Diet Hack Your Sleep

How To Diet Hack Your Sleep

If you’re living in a state of high performance; i.e if you’re studying, working or a full time parent, you probably already are; then sleep should be a conscience act, not something that just happens. You have the power to do specific things to make sure you’re tired when you decide to sleep. This includes eating the right foods at the right times, taking supplements and taking or not taking drugs and minimising technology that upsets your body melatonin production. THREE WAYS TO DIET HACK YOUR SLEEP! 1) FILL UP ON FAT! After reading David Asprey’s The Bullet Proof Diet and testing out the effects of MCT oil (medium chain triglycerides) on my own body and brain, I am now using a version of MCT (from food or oils) throughout the entire day. I’ve not only noticed an improvement in my sleep quality but my overall energy and brain ‘clearness’ through the day. ‘Fat is a long burning fuel for your mind and body’ – David Asprey. The shortest length fats of MCT oil are converted into ketones that are immediately used as fuel for your brain, and MCT oil can also help burn body fat while you sleep. I’ve noticed that I think faster and more clearly the next morning if I’ve had either MCT (or XCT or Brain Octane Oil, all MCT variations) the night before. I also find having a slow release complex carbohydrate such as oats before bed (see hack 3 below) also helps me sleep. This is because as you’re giving your body some glucose while you sleep as opposed to ketones from MCT. Both work great and I recommend experimenting with both and see what works best for you. Note: if you’re not used to MCT oil, start slowly and be sure to mix it with something (I normally use whey or vegan rice protein). Too much MCT without your body being used to it can give you a s Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

OK, here’s the deal – I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: an extremely high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet is not for everyone. But since ketones are a preferred fuel for the heart and the diaphragm, and because a state of ketosis can give you extreme focus and cognitive performance during difficult mental tasks, a ketogenic diet can be extremely useful for endurance athletes like triathletes, distance swimmers, cyclists, marathoners, ultra-runners, etc. Problem is, there aren’t a ton of resources out there about how highly active people can actually get into a state of ketosis without… A) chugging coconut oil and MCT oil all day long, which (trust me, I’ve tried) gets boring really, really fast; or B) experiencing some pretty extreme nutrient deficiencies from a ketogenic diet gone wrong – nutrient deficiencies that really get magnified when you combine them with crazy high levels of physical activity. So in this article, author, triathlete, and ketogenic expert extraordinaire Patricia Daly is going to fill you in on how to do things the right way. Patricia just finished writing an amazing book called “Practical Keto Meal Plans For Endurance Athletes: Tips, Tricks And How To’s For Optimizing Performance Using A High Fat, Low Carb Meal Plan“, and she’s a wealth of information on this topic. Take it away, Patricia. ————————————– Maybe the title of this article scares you a little bit… …after all, if there’s so much that can “go wrong” with the ketogenic and low carb lifestyle, is it worth all the effort? Or do you think you will never “get there” and achieve nutritional ketosis because there seem to so many stumbling blocks in your way, like talk about thyroid damage, lack of energy or extreme dietary Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

Last week, my staff nutritionist Laura Schoenfeld wrote a guest post for my blog called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health”. Perhaps not surprisingly, it has caused quite a stir. For reasons I don’t fully understand, some people identify so strongly with how many carbohydrates they eat that they take offense when a suggestion is made that low-carb diets may not be appropriate for everyone, in all circumstances. In these circles low-carb diets have become dogma (i.e. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true). Followers of this strange religious sect insist that everyone should be on low-carb or even ketogenic diets; that all carbohydrates, regardless of their source, are “toxic”; that most traditional hunter-gatherer (e.g. Paleolithic) societies followed a low-carb diet; and, similarly, that nutritional ketosis—which is only achievable with a very high-fat, low-carb, and low-protein diet—is our default and optimal physiological state. Cut through the confusion and hype and learn what research can tell us about low-carb diets. On the other hand, I’ve also observed somewhat of a backlash against low-carb diets occurring in the blogosphere of late. While I agree with many of the potential issues that have been raised about low-carb diets, and think it’s important to discuss them, I also feel it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that low-carb diets can be very effective therapeutic tools for certain conditions and in certain situations. With this in mind, here are 7 things I think everyone should know about low-carb diets. #1: Paleo does not equal low-carb, and very low-carb/ketogenic diets are not our “default” nutritional state, as some have claimed. Some low-carb advocates have claimed that mo Continue reading >>

More in ketosis