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High Fat Insulin Resistance

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Iron overload disorder: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment Hemochromatosis is an iron overload disorder in which a person absorbs too much iron from the food and drink they consume. Left untreated, it can damage various organs in the body. The skin takes on a bronze color. The surplus iron is stored in the liver, heart, pancreas, and other organs. Damage to the pancreas can lead to diabetes. Hereditary hemochromatosis can also lead to cancer and heart disease. Hemochromatosis can be primary, a result of genetic alterations, or secondary, as a result of another disease or condition. Primary hemochromatosis mostly affects white people. In the United States, it affects around 5 white people in every 1,000, and 10 percent of white people carry one of the genes related to the condition. However, many people have the gene mutation but no symptoms. As women regularly lose blood during menstruation, hemochromatosis is less common among females than males. Blood loss reduces iron levels.

What Causes Insulin Resistance? Lipid Overload

Over the past year I have interacted with hundreds of people with diabetes, and have come to learn one very important lesson that has changed my view of diabetes altogether. This realization came to me early on in my career as a nutrition and fitness coach for people with diabetes, and continues to hold true. While insulin resistance is a condition that is most commonly associated with type 2 diabetes, an increasing body of evidence is now shedding light on the fact that insulin resistance is a common thread that underlies many health conditions previously unassociated with blood sugar, including (but not limited to) heart disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, the metabolic syndrome, obesity and cancer. What that means is simple: insulin resistance significantly increases your risk for the development of a collection of health conditions that can significantly reduce your quality of life and decrease your life expectancy. Watch this video for a synopsis of the causes of insulin resistance: What is insulin and why should you care? Insulin is a hormone which is released by the pancreas in response to rising blood glucose. When you consume carbohydrates, the glucose that enters the bloo Continue reading >>

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  1. ForEverYoung

    High Fat diet causes insulin resistance??

    Are these guys saying that High Fat diets cause insulin resitance?
    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/con...4/11/1911.full

    Dietary fat has long been considered a potentially important modifiable risk factor for diabetes. The evidence for an adverse effect of high total fat and high saturated fat intake on blood glucose levels in nondiabetic populations is quite consistent, whereas the evidence for an effect of polyunsaturated fat intake is less clear (
    1). Positive associations have been found between the risk of type 2 diabetes or hyperglycemia and total fat intake in both prospective (2,3) and cross-sectional (4,5) studies. Positive associations have also been found with saturated (3,6,7) and animal (8) fat and meat (9) intake. A positive association was reported between polyunsaturated fat intake and hyperglycemia in the Hoorn Study (10), although a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes was associated with increased vegetable fat intake (11) and polyunsaturated fat intake (12) in the U.S. Nurses’ Health Study. Eating fish, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fat, has a beneficial effect on glycemia (13,14). In a number of other studies, there were no reported associations with dietary fat intake (15,16,17,18,19).

  2. JFejeran

    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies

  3. ForEverYoung

    Originally Posted by JFejeran
    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies Yep, I eat mostly vegatable fats(nuts, peanut butter, avocado, olive oil,olives) but I do like cheese. Tuna, chicken, fish.
    I have read that it blocks the receptors too. Thanks for mentioning that.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Consultation? - http://www.ThomasDeLauer.com Saturated Fats and Ketosis | Are Saturated Fats Safe and How Much to Have: Thomas DeLauer Saturated fats are common in the American diet They are shelf-stable, resistant to heat damage (solid at room temperature — think cooled bacon grease,) and essential to many bodily functions Roughly half of our cell membrane structure is composed of saturated fat, and saturated animal fats, like butter or fatty organ meats, contain huge amounts of essential fat-soluble vitamins (K2, A, D, among others) Common sources of saturated fat include red meat, whole milk and other whole-milk dairy foods, cheese, coconut oil, and many commercially prepared baked goods and other foods The word "saturated" refers to the number of hydrogen atoms surrounding each carbon atom The chain of carbon atoms holds as many hydrogen atoms as possible — it's saturated with hydrogens Saturated Fats Bad Rep The fear of saturated fat began in the 1950s when Ancel Keys published a paper supposedly linking saturated fat/cholesterol with rising rates of heart disease The theory - called lipid hypothesis - proposed that there was a direct relationship between the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol in the diet and the incidence of coronary heart disease Keys based his theory on a study of six countries, in which higher saturated fat intake equated to higher rates of heart disease However, he conveniently ignored data from 16 other countries that did not fit his theory Had he chosen a different set of countries, the data would have shown that increasing the percent of calories from fat reduces the number of deaths from coronary heart disease When you include all 22 countries for which data was available at the time of his study, you find that those who consume the highest percentage of saturated fat have the lowest risk of heart disease (7) Studies Prove Otherwise A meta-analysis study, published 2010, which pooled data from 21 studies and included nearly 348,000 adults, found no difference in the risks of heart disease and stroke between people with the lowest and highest intakes of saturated fat A Japanese prospective study that followed 58,000 men for an average of 14 years found no association between saturated fat intake and heart disease, and an inverse association between saturated fat and stroke (i.e. those who ate more saturated fat had a lower risk of stroke) (1,4) While in Ketosis There is a misconception that eating fat makes you fat Fat doesn’t make you fat. While you can technically overeat enough fat calories to accumulate adipose tissue, thus getting fat, this is a difficult feat Fat is very satiating, especially when paired with low-carb eating Dietary fat in the presence of large amounts of dietary carbohydrates can make it difficult to access fat for energy Dietary fat in the presence of low levels of dietary carbohydrates makes it easier to access fat for energy (5) References 1) Dietary intake of saturated fatty acids and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japanese: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation ... - PubMed - NCBI. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2... 2) How Eating Fat Can Make You Smarter | Greatist. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://greatist.com/eat/healthy-fats-... 3) The Importance of Fats in a Ketogenic Diet | Ruled Me. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ruled.me/importance-of-fa... 4) PubMed. (n.d.). Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2... 5) Saturated Fats are Good for You. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://articles.mercola.com/sites/art... 6) The truth about fats: the good, the bad, and the in-between - Harvard Health. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying... 7) Why Saturated Fat Is Not the Enemy (& Why We Need It). (n.d.). Retrieved from https://wellnessmama.com/1265/saturat...

Diet And Diabetes: Why Saturated Fats Are The Real Enemy

Diet and Diabetes: Why Saturated Fats Are the Real Enemy This is the seventh article in our Controversies series and the third piece focusing on the subject of fats. Today, we are going to explore the very important relationship between saturated fat intake and the onset of diabetes. As we mentioned in The Ultimate Guide to Saturated Fats , Once we control for weight, alcohol, smoking, exercise and family history, the incidence of diabetes is significantly associated with the proportion of saturated fat in our blood. Today we will take a deep dive to fully understand why there is such a strong link between diabetes and saturated fat consumption. We will also discuss how a plant-based diet may protect you from (or even reverse!) the disease. Insulin resistance is a hallmark of both prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what is insulin resistance exactly (and why is it important)? Insulin is what permits glucose (sugar) in the blood to enter our (muscle) cells. In essence, insulin unlocks the door, allowing the glucose to come in. If there is no insulin at all (the case of type 1 diabetes), the blood sugar hangs out in the bloodstream because it cannot get inside. That causes the bloo Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ForEverYoung

    High Fat diet causes insulin resistance??

    Are these guys saying that High Fat diets cause insulin resitance?
    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/con...4/11/1911.full

    Dietary fat has long been considered a potentially important modifiable risk factor for diabetes. The evidence for an adverse effect of high total fat and high saturated fat intake on blood glucose levels in nondiabetic populations is quite consistent, whereas the evidence for an effect of polyunsaturated fat intake is less clear (
    1). Positive associations have been found between the risk of type 2 diabetes or hyperglycemia and total fat intake in both prospective (2,3) and cross-sectional (4,5) studies. Positive associations have also been found with saturated (3,6,7) and animal (8) fat and meat (9) intake. A positive association was reported between polyunsaturated fat intake and hyperglycemia in the Hoorn Study (10), although a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes was associated with increased vegetable fat intake (11) and polyunsaturated fat intake (12) in the U.S. Nurses’ Health Study. Eating fish, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fat, has a beneficial effect on glycemia (13,14). In a number of other studies, there were no reported associations with dietary fat intake (15,16,17,18,19).

  2. JFejeran

    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies

  3. ForEverYoung

    Originally Posted by JFejeran
    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies Yep, I eat mostly vegatable fats(nuts, peanut butter, avocado, olive oil,olives) but I do like cheese. Tuna, chicken, fish.
    I have read that it blocks the receptors too. Thanks for mentioning that.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Low Carb High Fat Diet or High Carb Diet - Which Causes Insulin Resistance: https://youtu.be/NbU8RIBRvjI Diabetes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mentioned Book - Video - Website / Shout Outs -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DR GREGER'S BOOK - HOW NOT TO DIE US Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2g67bmK UK Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2grlYwy http://nutritionfacts.org/book/ Dr Greger's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/Nutritio... Dr Gregers website http://nutritionfacts.org/ This is for educational purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. ===================================================== Thanx for watching this Video!! Please do SUBSCRIBE & LIKE so you can help my new channel to GROW! & share this with friends All your support means the world to me! Till next time Keep on Keepin On & Just Go Do It Already ===================================================== STATS Name: Jon Anthony Age: 45 Height: 6:3" / 191cm Starting Weight: 151.8kg / 335lbs / (BMI) 41.9 Current Weight: 111.0kg / 244lbs / (BMI) 30.6 To date Loss Weight: 40.8kg / 89.76lbs / 6 stones Goal Weight: is to lose another 20kg - 44lbs And then to see what it looks like when I get there :) 90kg / 198lbs (BMI) 24.7 KG to LBS: http://kgtolbs.net https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=kg%... =============================================== BUSINESS Inquiries: [email protected] =============================================== Michael Greger MD NGO Website: http://nutritionfacts.org Book How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease US Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2g67bmK UK Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2grlYwy Your purchase or the Book How Not to Die via the link above will have money go to the NGO http://nutritionfacts.org and very small affiliate commission will be sent to me. =================================================== Visualize What Losing 10kg / 22lbs Looks Like https://youtu.be/JjrsD4erTXg I have lost well over 85+ lbs to date January 23rd 2017 - 109.8kg / 241.5lbs - Went Gym January 22nd 2017 - 109.8kg / 241.5lbs - Went Gym January 21st 2017 - 110.2kg / 242.4lbs - Went Gym January 20th 2017 - 110.5kg / 243.1lbs - Went Gym January 19th 2017 - 110.8kg / 243.7lbs - Went Gym January 18th 2017 - 110.8kg / 243.7lbs - Went Gym January 17th 2017 - 110.7kg / 243.5lbs - No Gym January 16th 2017 - 110.7kg / 243.5lbs - Went Gym January 15th 2017 - 111.8kg / 244.8lbs - Went Gym January 14th 2017 - 111.3kg / 244.8lbs - No Gym January 13th 2017 - 111.9kg / 246.1lbs - Went Gym January 12th 2017 - 111.8kg / 245.9lbs - Went Gym January 11th 2017 - 112.4kg / 247.2lbs - Went Gym January 10th 2017 - 112.2kg / 246.8lbs - Went Gym

Effect Of High Fat Diet On Insulin Resistance: Dietary Fat Versus Visceral Fat Mass.

Effect of high fat diet on insulin resistance: dietary fat versus visceral fat mass. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether chronic high-fat diet (HF) induces insulin resistance independently of obesity. We randomly divided 40 rats into two groups and fed them either with a HF or with a high-carbohydrate diet (HC) for 8 weeks. Whole body glucose disappearance rate (Rd) was measured using a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Firstly, we defined whether insulin resistance by HF was associated with obesity. Plasma glucose and triglyceride concentrations were significantly increased in HF. Rd was decreased (10.6+/-0.2 vs. 9.1+/-0.2 mg/kg/min in HC and HF, respectively) and the hepatic glucose output rate (HGO) was increased in HF (2.2+/-0.3 vs. 4.5+/-0.2 mg/kg/min in HC and HF, respectively). Rd was significantly correlated with %VF (p<0.01). These results implicate that visceral obesity is associated with insulin resistance induced by HF. In addition, to define whether dietary fat induces insulin resistance regardless of visceral obesity, we compared Rd and HGO between groups 1) after matching %VF in both groups Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ForEverYoung

    High Fat diet causes insulin resistance??

    Are these guys saying that High Fat diets cause insulin resitance?
    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/con...4/11/1911.full

    Dietary fat has long been considered a potentially important modifiable risk factor for diabetes. The evidence for an adverse effect of high total fat and high saturated fat intake on blood glucose levels in nondiabetic populations is quite consistent, whereas the evidence for an effect of polyunsaturated fat intake is less clear (
    1). Positive associations have been found between the risk of type 2 diabetes or hyperglycemia and total fat intake in both prospective (2,3) and cross-sectional (4,5) studies. Positive associations have also been found with saturated (3,6,7) and animal (8) fat and meat (9) intake. A positive association was reported between polyunsaturated fat intake and hyperglycemia in the Hoorn Study (10), although a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes was associated with increased vegetable fat intake (11) and polyunsaturated fat intake (12) in the U.S. Nurses’ Health Study. Eating fish, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fat, has a beneficial effect on glycemia (13,14). In a number of other studies, there were no reported associations with dietary fat intake (15,16,17,18,19).

  2. JFejeran

    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies

  3. ForEverYoung

    Originally Posted by JFejeran
    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies Yep, I eat mostly vegatable fats(nuts, peanut butter, avocado, olive oil,olives) but I do like cheese. Tuna, chicken, fish.
    I have read that it blocks the receptors too. Thanks for mentioning that.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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