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High Fat Diet And Insulin Resistance

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Iron overload disorder: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment Hemochromatosis is an iron overload disorder in which a person absorbs too much iron from the food and drink they consume. Left untreated, it can damage various organs in the body. The skin takes on a bronze color. The surplus iron is stored in the liver, heart, pancreas, and other organs. Damage to the pancreas can lead to diabetes. Hereditary hemochromatosis can also lead to cancer and heart disease. Hemochromatosis can be primary, a result of genetic alterations, or secondary, as a result of another disease or condition. Primary hemochromatosis mostly affects white people. In the United States, it affects around 5 white people in every 1,000, and 10 percent of white people carry one of the genes related to the condition. However, many people have the gene mutation but no symptoms. As women regularly lose blood during menstruation, hemochromatosis is less common among females than males. Blood loss reduces iron levels.

What Causes Insulin Resistance? Lipid Overload

Over the past year I have interacted with hundreds of people with diabetes, and have come to learn one very important lesson that has changed my view of diabetes altogether. This realization came to me early on in my career as a nutrition and fitness coach for people with diabetes, and continues to hold true. While insulin resistance is a condition that is most commonly associated with type 2 diabetes, an increasing body of evidence is now shedding light on the fact that insulin resistance is a common thread that underlies many health conditions previously unassociated with blood sugar, including (but not limited to) heart disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, the metabolic syndrome, obesity and cancer. What that means is simple: insulin resistance significantly increases your risk for the development of a collection of health conditions that can significantly reduce your quality of life and decrease your life expectancy. Watch this video for a synopsis of the causes of insulin resistance: What is insulin and why should you care? Insulin is a hormone which is released by the pancreas in response to rising blood glucose. When you consume carbohydrates, the glucose that enters the bloo Continue reading >>

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  1. ForEverYoung

    High Fat diet causes insulin resistance??

    Are these guys saying that High Fat diets cause insulin resitance?
    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/con...4/11/1911.full

    Dietary fat has long been considered a potentially important modifiable risk factor for diabetes. The evidence for an adverse effect of high total fat and high saturated fat intake on blood glucose levels in nondiabetic populations is quite consistent, whereas the evidence for an effect of polyunsaturated fat intake is less clear (
    1). Positive associations have been found between the risk of type 2 diabetes or hyperglycemia and total fat intake in both prospective (2,3) and cross-sectional (4,5) studies. Positive associations have also been found with saturated (3,6,7) and animal (8) fat and meat (9) intake. A positive association was reported between polyunsaturated fat intake and hyperglycemia in the Hoorn Study (10), although a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes was associated with increased vegetable fat intake (11) and polyunsaturated fat intake (12) in the U.S. Nurses’ Health Study. Eating fish, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fat, has a beneficial effect on glycemia (13,14). In a number of other studies, there were no reported associations with dietary fat intake (15,16,17,18,19).

  2. JFejeran

    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies

  3. ForEverYoung

    Originally Posted by JFejeran
    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies Yep, I eat mostly vegatable fats(nuts, peanut butter, avocado, olive oil,olives) but I do like cheese. Tuna, chicken, fish.
    I have read that it blocks the receptors too. Thanks for mentioning that.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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My examination of the effects of meat-laden diets on insulin sensitivity continues. Ketogenic diets, starvation, and diabetes are considered in light of the "Carnivore Connection" hypothesis. You'll see that the prob-lems with meat go beyond its excessive protein content. I'll show you evidence of impaired carbohydrate metabolism after low-carb dieting. Note: Andersson's glycosuria was observed after the consumption of a test meal.

36 How To Become Insulin Resistant (the Paleo Way) 2

My channel viewers are well familiar with the famous old experiment that placed two men, Vilhjalmur Stefansson and Karsten Andersson, on a diet entirely composed of meat for a whole year. This is a low carber favorite because a superficial reading of the summary from this experiment stated that the meaty dieters got through their year just fine. I think very few low carbers have read this other paper about that crazy experiment. By the end of their year of meat and fat, Andersson had sugar in his urine. (NOTE: Glycosuria was measured following a test meal.) Sugar in the urine is an indicator of uncontrolled diabetes. This should cause sugar-obsessed low carbers to do some soul searching because these men consumed only meat. There wasn't a single speck of flour or sugar in their diets that could be scapegoated for this. Even worse for the low carbers, Andersson's urine returned to normal after he resumed eating carbs. This graph shows you what happened to Andersson's blood sugar. The top line represents his blood sugar (in response to an oral glucose challenge) while eating only meat. The bottom line shows his lower blood sugar (in response to the same challenge) after he resumed ea Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ForEverYoung

    High Fat diet causes insulin resistance??

    Are these guys saying that High Fat diets cause insulin resitance?
    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/con...4/11/1911.full

    Dietary fat has long been considered a potentially important modifiable risk factor for diabetes. The evidence for an adverse effect of high total fat and high saturated fat intake on blood glucose levels in nondiabetic populations is quite consistent, whereas the evidence for an effect of polyunsaturated fat intake is less clear (
    1). Positive associations have been found between the risk of type 2 diabetes or hyperglycemia and total fat intake in both prospective (2,3) and cross-sectional (4,5) studies. Positive associations have also been found with saturated (3,6,7) and animal (8) fat and meat (9) intake. A positive association was reported between polyunsaturated fat intake and hyperglycemia in the Hoorn Study (10), although a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes was associated with increased vegetable fat intake (11) and polyunsaturated fat intake (12) in the U.S. Nurses’ Health Study. Eating fish, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fat, has a beneficial effect on glycemia (13,14). In a number of other studies, there were no reported associations with dietary fat intake (15,16,17,18,19).

  2. JFejeran

    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies

  3. ForEverYoung

    Originally Posted by JFejeran
    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies Yep, I eat mostly vegatable fats(nuts, peanut butter, avocado, olive oil,olives) but I do like cheese. Tuna, chicken, fish.
    I have read that it blocks the receptors too. Thanks for mentioning that.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Low Carb High Fat Diet or High Carb Diet - Which Causes Insulin Resistance: https://youtu.be/NbU8RIBRvjI Diabetes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mentioned Book - Video - Website / Shout Outs -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DR GREGER'S BOOK - HOW NOT TO DIE US Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2g67bmK UK Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2grlYwy http://nutritionfacts.org/book/ Dr Greger's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/Nutritio... Dr Gregers website http://nutritionfacts.org/ This is for educational purposes only and no copyright infringement is intended. ===================================================== Thanx for watching this Video!! Please do SUBSCRIBE & LIKE so you can help my new channel to GROW! & share this with friends All your support means the world to me! Till next time Keep on Keepin On & Just Go Do It Already ===================================================== STATS Name: Jon Anthony Age: 45 Height: 6:3" / 191cm Starting Weight: 151.8kg / 335lbs / (BMI) 41.9 Current Weight: 111.0kg / 244lbs / (BMI) 30.6 To date Loss Weight: 40.8kg / 89.76lbs / 6 stones Goal Weight: is to lose another 20kg - 44lbs And then to see what it looks like when I get there :) 90kg / 198lbs (BMI) 24.7 KG to LBS: http://kgtolbs.net https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=kg%... =============================================== BUSINESS Inquiries: [email protected] =============================================== Michael Greger MD NGO Website: http://nutritionfacts.org Book How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease US Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2g67bmK UK Amazon Book How Not to Die: http://amzn.to/2grlYwy Your purchase or the Book How Not to Die via the link above will have money go to the NGO http://nutritionfacts.org and very small affiliate commission will be sent to me. =================================================== Visualize What Losing 10kg / 22lbs Looks Like https://youtu.be/JjrsD4erTXg I have lost well over 85+ lbs to date January 23rd 2017 - 109.8kg / 241.5lbs - Went Gym January 22nd 2017 - 109.8kg / 241.5lbs - Went Gym January 21st 2017 - 110.2kg / 242.4lbs - Went Gym January 20th 2017 - 110.5kg / 243.1lbs - Went Gym January 19th 2017 - 110.8kg / 243.7lbs - Went Gym January 18th 2017 - 110.8kg / 243.7lbs - Went Gym January 17th 2017 - 110.7kg / 243.5lbs - No Gym January 16th 2017 - 110.7kg / 243.5lbs - Went Gym January 15th 2017 - 111.8kg / 244.8lbs - Went Gym January 14th 2017 - 111.3kg / 244.8lbs - No Gym January 13th 2017 - 111.9kg / 246.1lbs - Went Gym January 12th 2017 - 111.8kg / 245.9lbs - Went Gym January 11th 2017 - 112.4kg / 247.2lbs - Went Gym January 10th 2017 - 112.2kg / 246.8lbs - Went Gym

A High-fat, Ketogenic Diet Causes Hepatic Insulin Resistance In Mice, Despite Increasing Energy Expenditure And Preventing Weight Gain

Go to: Low-carbohydrate, high-fat ketogenic diets (KD) have been suggested to be more effective in promoting weight loss than conventional caloric restriction, whereas their effect on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and the mechanisms by which they may promote weight loss remain controversial. The aim of this study was to explore the role of KD on liver and muscle insulin sensitivity, hepatic lipid metabolism, energy expenditure, and food intake. Using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, we studied insulin action in mice fed a KD or regular chow (RC). Body composition was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite being 15% lighter (P < 0.001) than RC-fed mice because of a 17% increase in energy expenditure (P < 0.001), KD-fed mice manifested severe hepatic insulin resistance, as reflected by decreased suppression (0% vs. 100% in RC-fed mice, P < 0.01) of endogenous glucose production during the clamp. Hepatic insulin resistance could be attributed to a 350% increase in hepatic diacylglycerol content (P < 0.001), resulting in increased activation of PKCε (P < 0.05) and decreased insulin receptor substrate-2 tyrosine phosphorylation (P < 0.01). Food intake was 56% Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ForEverYoung

    High Fat diet causes insulin resistance??

    Are these guys saying that High Fat diets cause insulin resitance?
    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/con...4/11/1911.full

    Dietary fat has long been considered a potentially important modifiable risk factor for diabetes. The evidence for an adverse effect of high total fat and high saturated fat intake on blood glucose levels in nondiabetic populations is quite consistent, whereas the evidence for an effect of polyunsaturated fat intake is less clear (
    1). Positive associations have been found between the risk of type 2 diabetes or hyperglycemia and total fat intake in both prospective (2,3) and cross-sectional (4,5) studies. Positive associations have also been found with saturated (3,6,7) and animal (8) fat and meat (9) intake. A positive association was reported between polyunsaturated fat intake and hyperglycemia in the Hoorn Study (10), although a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes was associated with increased vegetable fat intake (11) and polyunsaturated fat intake (12) in the U.S. Nurses’ Health Study. Eating fish, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fat, has a beneficial effect on glycemia (13,14). In a number of other studies, there were no reported associations with dietary fat intake (15,16,17,18,19).

  2. JFejeran

    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies

  3. ForEverYoung

    Originally Posted by JFejeran
    i've been attending a diabetes class offered by the local seventh day adventist wellness clinic. they 'preach' that a diet high in animal fat is one of the leading causes of t2. they believe that the fat 'coats' the insulin receptors and blocks the insulin from opening up the cell so that glucose can enter.
    they also say that by eating a vegan diet, along with exercise, a person can 'reverse' their t2 diabetes since this will 'cleanse' the body of that unwanted fatty coating on the insulin receptors.
    needless to say, i'm not quite ready to switch to totally vegan. but i will continue to eat more veggies Yep, I eat mostly vegatable fats(nuts, peanut butter, avocado, olive oil,olives) but I do like cheese. Tuna, chicken, fish.
    I have read that it blocks the receptors too. Thanks for mentioning that.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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