diabetestalk.net

High Blood Sugar On Keto

How The Ketogenic Diet Weakens Cancer Cells

How The Ketogenic Diet Weakens Cancer Cells

Chronic disease continues to ravage our world today despite tremendous advances in health care. Therapeutic approaches to treating this wide-range suffering cannot be met by technological growth in pharmacology, genetic therapy, or surgery. It should be obvious that the real solution for treating cancer and disease is not found in a man-made pill but rather is found in regulating the metabolic functions within our bodies. Western cultures today enjoy a diet rich in the delicacies that our ancestors did not consume on a regular basis such as grain, sugar, and starch. Research continues to show that sugar is the main source of fuel which feeds cancer and contributes to an inflammatory environment. Sugar essentially increases the risk for cancer and disease. How the Ketogenic Diet Works What is the Ketogenic Diet? The Eskimos and Maasai group are cultures we often look at to learn how their scant consumption of carbohydrates sustained their bodies through harsh weather conditions. It turns out that their low carb diet switched their metabolism to burn fat instead of sugar or glucose. This created a metabolic state known as ketosis, a process in which the body burns ketones to make energy, instead of relying on sugar or carbohydrate. Ketones are metabolized by fatty acids in the liver for energy. (This source of fuel is capable of crossing the blood brain barrier and is an excellent form of energy for neurons.) When the body lacks glucose, which is its first source of fuel, ketones are created in its absence. Ketosis was a beneficial process the human body developed as an adaptation to times when food was unavailable (such as for these hunter-gatherers). However, you can effectively produce ketones too by limiting the carbohydrates in your diet to less than 80 grams daily a Continue reading >>

The High Blood Glucose Dilemma On Low Carb (lc) Diets

The High Blood Glucose Dilemma On Low Carb (lc) Diets

If you are on a ketogenic or very low carb (VLC) diet (e.g. with 50-100gr carb/day and/or eating ketone producing MCT oils such as coconut oil), you may have a dilemma of having high Blood Glucose (BG) despite eating LC: If you are keto adapted, that is, your body is using ketones and even though you have sufficient insulin (say >5 microU/ml) your body tries to keep your BG higher than necessary, e.g. above 100-110 mg/dl. That is your BG set-point is always high. If you try to lower the set-point to say 80s, by water Intermittent Fasting (IF), then your body starts to convert your muscles into glucose to keep its high BG set-point. So, you may have a slightly lower BG, but you lose some muscle mass. Having a high set-point has many other problems, e.g. if you eat something with a little bit more carb, say a small fruit, your BG shoots up to 130s and stays there for hours. This may be due to something called "Physiological Insulin Resistance (PhIR) by Petro Dobromylskyj. He wrote many good articles about it -???thanks Petro--in his blog Hyperlipid. Apparently, PhIR is a normal reaction of the body and quite different from Pathological Insulin Resistance (PaIR). It seems that the main difference between PhIR and PaIR is that insulin is at a normal level in the former and abnormally high in the latter. (PaIR is obviously type2 diabetes.) If I understand correctly, PhIR is kind of IR only in the muscle tissue, that is only the muscles do not react to insulin and NOT use glucose even though it is available. However, if you are eating too much protein, the liver may also be considered IR, because it tries to keep the BG high by converting proteins to glucose, even though BG is already too high, that is, it also may not be responding to insulin. (I think working muscles can us Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

Any diabetic will tell you: following a healthy diet is vital to maintaining a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. While it is contrary to what we traditionally believe to be “healthy”, the ketogenic diet has become increasingly popular among diabetics. What is the Keto Diet? The keto diet involves a very high consumption of dietary fats, and very low carbohydrate consumption. Through these nutritional changes, the body reduces its use of glucose for fuel, and increasingly uses ketones (derived from fats). The diet was first used to control epileptic seizures, but there is growing body of research showing positive effects on Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury, inflammation1, and diabetes. Benefits of the Keto Diet for Diabetics When you are diabetic it is vital to discuss nutritional changes with your doctor prior to starting a new diet. If you are a diabetic considering the ketogenic diet, here are a few potential benefits to bring up with your doctor: Weight Loss on the Ketogenic Diet Type 2 diabetes and obesity are closely linked: 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are also overweight or obese2. The CDC recommends weight loss as a means to maintaining a healthier body for those struggling with diabetes because it can positively affect blood sugar levels and reduce risks of other related health conditions3. Because weight loss can have such a dramatic positive impact for those struggling with type 2 diabetes, most of the diets prescribed to diabetics focus on weight loss. The ketogenic diet is no exception, and often leads to substantial weight loss and improved body composition. It’s also interesting to note that the ketogenic diet may contribute to a greater preservation of muscle mass during weight loss4 than other diet Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Lowers Blood Pressure: Fat For Fuel!!

Ketogenic Diet Lowers Blood Pressure: Fat For Fuel!!

Low Carb – High Fat Diets It wasn’t that long ago that low-carb diets were being targeted by medical professionals as unhealthy and detrimental to people’s health. The high fat intake in these diets was thought to be at the root of increased cholesterol and subsequent heart disease. However, in the last 15 years or so, due to a significant number of studies, the medical field has started to change its tune. Now it seems that low carb diets are seen to be amongst the most effective in dealing with a number of health conditions, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight loss and circulatory and other metabolic diseases. The Ketogenic Diet – what exactly is it? According to Dr Joseph Mercola, a highly respected Osteo-pathic physician and Alternative Health Advocate, the Ketogenic Diet is “An eating plan that’s low in sugar and net carbs (carbs without fiber), moderate in protein and high in healthy fats. A ketogenic diet helps you reach nutritional ketosis where your body burns fat for its primary fuel instead of cell-damaging carbs.” The body is designed to use fats more efficiently than carbohydrates with the result that by eating more healthy fats, less protein and carbs you will kick start the body’s metabolism to burn more fat and ketones. Ketones are substances which naturally occur in the body and are created in the liver. These are then the substances which are purposed to be turned into and used as energy. Additionally, this ketogenic process will also stimulate the mitochondria (the fuel producing elements of each cell) to produce optimal amounts of energy. This is certainly very beneficial to the body as a whole, and especially to the high energy-driven organs like the brain, heart and muscles. for more info click here How does this Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diabetes! Keto Os Changed Her Life!

High Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diabetes! Keto Os Changed Her Life!

Taking Keto OS and following a Ketogenic diet is helping my blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels get back in the normal range. My physical issues are improving! “My name is Terry. I am 58 years old, a wife, a grandma and I work at and own a Professional Kennel. I wanted to share my journey of my ups and downs of weight loss and gain. When I was young I was always tall and thin… Very athletic, a workaholic and could pretty well eat what I wanted. Then stress hit me hard. I became an anorexic. To me it was the only thing I felt I could control in my life. I was 5′ 6″… Weighed 103 pounds and thought I was fat. I finally got over those feelings and started eating again. I maintained a healthy weight for some years. Then stress hit me hard again and also age. I gained allot of weight. I hated myself, disliked pictures of me and hated who I saw in the mirror. This went on for allot of years. I had so many health issues. High blood pressure , diabetes, high cholesterol, physical issues (back, hip and knee) and heart problems. Then the big “C” hit me. I was diagnosed with kidney cancer. I had surgery in 2012 and was cancer free… At that time I lost 80 pounds. This was good for about a year. Then I started craving sugar. Lots of it. I soon gain allot of that weight back. I was very upset with myself as I was before. And then it happened. My dear friend invited me to her house for a meeting with Amanda and Ted Bright in Huky 2016. To hear what KETO/os and a Keto diet was all about. They provided allot of good info and sent me home with samples. With my nutritional business background it all made since to me. (I worked as a Dietary Manger in Nursing Homes for years.) So I ordered the product KETO/os orange/charged. Within 2 days I was amazed of the en Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Blood Sugar

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Blood Sugar

What happens to your blood sugar when you eat fat? The steps you need to stabilize your blood sugar and increase your fat-burning hormones (by following a Fat Fueled, keto eating style). Up until I found keto (high-fat, low-carb living) I was in the “eat every 2-3 hours in order to control blood sugar” camp. What I didn’t know, was that the constant eating; generally of carbohydrates, was exactly what was causing my blood sugar irregularities – constant “hangry” feelings, hypoglycemia, insulin resistance, and more. After a couple of weeks of eating Fat Fueled, keto, I no longer struggled with hypoglycemia. It was as if my sugar lows just… disappeared. And I’m not the only one that’s experienced massive changes to blood sugar shortly after shifting to a Fat Fueled, keto life. I invited Dietitian Cassie on the show today to help explain exactly what happens to our blood sugar when we eat fat – the ins and outs of insulin resistance, actions that affect blood sugar, how to use carb-ups to heal insulin resistance and much more. Today’s keto video encourages us to use dietary fat as our ally, to rely on it to support balanced blood sugar, thriving hormones and a healthy body. For video transcription, scroll down. Highlights… What foods affect blood sugar How dietary fat affects your blood sugar If combining carbohydrates and fat is a good thing How fat cells are created How to get into fat-burning mode Signs and symptoms of insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity How cortisol (and a poor sleep) affects your blood sugar How carb cycling and carb refeeding can help bust through insulin resistance How to heal yourself from insulin resistance Resources… Watch the video: When to know it’s time to carb-up (and how to do it) Step-by-step guide on goin Continue reading >>

Protein, Gluconeogenesis, And Blood Sugar

Protein, Gluconeogenesis, And Blood Sugar

Recently (for some conception of recent) we asked the question: If You Eat Excess Protein, Does It Turn Into Excess Glucose? One of the potentially confusing aspects of this question, is the difference between gluconeogenesis (GNG) — the creation of new glucose that didn't exist before, and increases in blood sugar. In response to our post, several people made comments that indicated an implicit assumption that changes in blood sugar can be used as a measurement of GNG, but as we will explain below, this is not the case. However, it brought to our attention an important distinction. There are several reasons people might care about excess GNG. One we have already addressed: It is not the case that GNG requires excess cortisol. In terms of the effect of the glucose itself that results from GNG, there are two distinct concerns: How does excess GNG affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar levels are important because too much sugar in the blood at a given time can cause damage to cells ⁰. Does producing more glucose via GNG ultimately lead to either using more glucose for fuel, or storing it as fat? So when people worry about protein causing excess GNG, what they are really worrying about is that protein will adversely affect their blood sugar levels, or that they are going to use more glucose for fuel than they intended, or that they will store it as unwanted fat. While it would be interesting to understand the effect of eating excess protein on GNG, it doesn't directly address those underlying questions, because there are many other mechanisms in play. We want to know whether for ketogenic dieters eating excess protein adversely affects blood sugar levels, whether it leads to higher consumption of glucose for fuel, and whether it increases the tendency to store fat. In Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

A physician conducted a decade-long experiment on the health effects of a ketogenic diet, using himself as the laboratory rat; he experienced improvement in insulin sensitivity, body fat, lipids, blood sugar, and other markers A ketogenic diet requires carbohydrate and protein restriction, with 50 to 80 percent of calories coming from fats; this forces your body to shift toward using ketones as its primary fuel source, instead of glucose Although your brain is more dependent on glucose than your heart, your liver can produce a ketone-like compound that your brain can efficiently use for energy Scientists extended the lifespan of mice by 20 percent by suppressing the activity of just one gene that helps control metabolism and energy balance; this is further evidence that longevity is tied to insulin signaling The best way to jumpstart your fat-burning/ketone-producing engine is by drastically reducing your consumption of sugar and grains, fasting intermittently, and maintaining a consistent exercise routine By Dr. Mercola We are just beginning to understand the biological intricacies of aging. A growing body of research is challenging the belief that aging is beyond your control, prompting scientists to begin thinking about ways we can slow our aging clocks to a slow crawl. Although this is a relatively new branch of science, there are some factors that appear to be key in controlling how quickly you age. One major factor seems to be insulin signaling and the metabolic "engines" you have running day to day, which are largely controlled by the foods you eat. In the first featured video, Dr. Peter Attia discusses how a ketogenic diet can optimize your metabolism. But before I discuss the specifics of this, I want to tell you about a remarkable mouse study, presented in the Continue reading >>

Can A Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetic Take Keto//os?

Can A Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetic Take Keto//os?

Diabetic patients should only use this product under the care of a physician. In both T1 and T2 diabetes, patients have abnormal insulin signaling. In T1, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin, and in T2, the body’s tissues are resistant to insulin. Insulin helps transport glucose from the blood into the cells where it can be used for energy. In severely uncontrolled diabetes (typically someone not being treated for their condition), insulin signaling is wildly impaired, and an acute and life-threatening condition called ketoacidosis can occur. If a person is eating a standard diet wherein carbohydrate is a major portion of their macronutrient intake, their tissues are mostly burning glucose for fuel. Therefore, if insulin signaling is incredibly impaired, this will cause glucose to build up in the blood because it can’t get into the cells. Thus, the cells are basically starving even though there’s plenty of glucose in the blood. (This is sometimes referred to as “starvation in the land of plenty.”) This causes the liver to begin making ketones from stored fats, just as it would if you were starving from not eating anything. Insulin also plays a role in regulating ketone production, and normally it inhibits ketone production if it’s too high to keep ketones at a proper level in the blood. So, if the patient’s diabetes is too severely uncontrolled, it is possible that a situation called “runaway ketogenesis” occurs. The liver makes lots and lots of ketones in a short amount of time. Ketones are acids, and when at extremely high levels (typically >20mM), they can cause blood pH to drop, which can be very dangerous and/or fatal. This is diabetic ketoacidosis. Is being in therapeutic ketosis itself dangerous for a diabetic? No. There is substantial sc Continue reading >>

How To Combat Heart Disease And Diabetes? Go Keto, Says New Study

How To Combat Heart Disease And Diabetes? Go Keto, Says New Study

A new study[1] indicates that when it comes to weight loss and regulating metabolic syndrome diseases like diabetes, a keto diet without exercise is more beneficial than the standard American diet (i.e., “standard American eating habits”) — with or without exercise. Keto diet sans exercise outperforms standard American diet with exercise The study included 30 adults previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group of risk factors (like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat) that put you at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Researchers put the adults in one of three groups: a sustained ketogenic diet with no exercise, a standard American diet (SAD) with no exercise, or a SAD with 3-5 days of exercise per week at 30 minutes a pop. Over 10 weeks, the results revealed significant changes for the keto group — particularly, as related to weight, body fat percentage, body mass index, HgA1c (a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months) and ketones. In fact, all of these variables for the keto group out-performed the other two groups. The verdict is in – a keto diet without exercise is more potent than the standard American diet with exercise when it comes to weight loss and curbing diseases. Ketosis helps you lose weight Ketosis occurs when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar or carbs for energy. That’s why the keto diet is low in carbs, moderate in protein, and high in fat. (Read more about the keto diet here.) For someone who can stand to shed extra pounds, Keto is a great long-term dietary strategy. Ketosis reverses metabolic syndrome pathologies The study shows that for someone with MetS, the body can’t convert glucose to fat in res Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: When Doctors’ Good Advice Turns Bad

Type 1 Diabetes: When Doctors’ Good Advice Turns Bad

Here’s a fascinating blog that throws up an ethical dilemma for doctors, nurses and dietitians who dish out orthodox advice for type 1 diabetes. The writer is Lemming Test-Pilot, the alter ego of a British GP who has type 1 diabetes. Last year, Lemming ditched “the almost impossible dark art of carbohydrate counting”, went on a low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic diet and survived. Actually, Lemming hasn’t just survived but has thrived in body and mind. And has been running half marathons faster ever since, even after fasting. Doctors and nurses told Lemming to go on the wrong diet for type 1 diabetes for 20 years. Lemming is understandably miffed about that but says with admirable restraint: “Any other condition managed with the wrong treatment for 20 years would rightly merit a lawsuit. The guideline advisers are getting knighthoods.” Here is Lemming’s remarkable, poignant, real-life story: By Lemming Test-Pilot* I have had type 1 diabetes for 20 years. I got it relatively late, in my 30’s. I’ve managed it the conventional way: 55% carbs, 30% fat mostly unsaturated, basal (long-acting) insulin, and DAFNE (Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating) with carbohydrate counting and injection of rapid acting insulin to balance the glucose. I look after my weight and exercise regularly. I tried three types of statins at various doses but had to stop due to muscle pains and fatigue. My blood pressure is OK and cholesterol reasonable in the 5’s. I have tried hard to manage my condition to the best of my ability and have followed the NICE guidelines and regularly attend for check-ups. My GP or Diabetes Nurse takes my measurements every year, makes some suggestions for improvement (there is always room for improvement) then leaves me to it for another year. My GP team the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Every minute, three people in the U.S. are diagnosed with diabetes, for a total of 20.9 million people living with the disease (as of 2011, so that number is probably even higher now). That’s up from just 5.6 million in 1980. Currently, about 7% of people in the US have diabetes, but that doesn’t actually tell the whole story. An estimated 86 million more have pre-diabetes (blood sugar high enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be diabetes. Diabetes is sometimes called a “lifestyle disease,” meaning that it’s caused by lifestyle factors like diet and exercise, rather than a particular germ or gene. It’s often (but not always!) associated with other lifestyle diseases like obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure, because the same kinds of lifestyle patterns tend to cause more than one of those problems. When the Paleo crowd starts talking about diabetes, we typically start from the fact that it’s almost unknown in traditional cultures, even among people in later middle-age. The natural suggestion from there is to eat like people in those cultures – minimal processed and refined foods. But there are a few problems with this: All those traditional groups eat differently, so who do you want to imitate, the ultra low-carb and diabetes-free Maasai, or the high-carb and equally diabetes-free Kitavans? Diet isn’t the only difference. Lifestyle factors like sleep and exercise also have a huge effect on diabetes: it’s not just food. A diet that works in the context of one lifestyle might not work in another. Prevention isn’t the same as cure. People who’ve lived in the modern world their whole lives might need more intensive intervention than people who’ve always been healthy. For a really comprehensive look at diabetes, we need to get bey Continue reading >>

More in ketosis