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High Blood Sugar On Keto

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

Tracking ketone levels is a large part of success on the ketogenic diet. It helps you know how far you are into ketosis and where we might need to make changes. But did you know that there’s an even better way to step it up a notch? The glucose ketone index is a simple calculation that allows you to find out how ketosis works best for you individually. Without it, you could be in full, high-level ketosis yet still not getting the full benefits. In this post, we’ll be looking at how to easily track your glucose ketone index for different aspects of health along with your ketogenic diet. Basics of the Glucose Ketone Index Here’s what you need to know about the glucose ketone index (GKI): Researchers have used the index in studies on the ketogenic diet, fasting, and more. Additionally, it has been used for tracking changes and progress regarding weight loss, athletic performance, management of metabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and even cancer treatment. Now that we’ve covered the basics of what the GKI does, let’s talk about how you can use tracking it to your advantage. Tracking Your Glucose Ketone Index What’s so special about the glucose ketone index is that it lets you track both glucose and ketones at the same time, taking into account how they work together. It’s a way to know your optimal state for addressing all sorts of health conditions. Tracking this number benefits you over simply measuring ketone levels. That’s because even if you’re deeply in ketosis, you could still have high blood glucose levels that throw things off and affect your health. Essentially, it gives you a more full picture of your metabolic health. The numbers you can expect to target depend on your intentions for being in ketosis. Is your goal weight loss, better overa Continue reading >>

4: Fasting For Keto-adaptation, High Blood Ketones, Elevated And Low Blood Sugar, No Weight Loss, Slowing Fat Metabolism

4: Fasting For Keto-adaptation, High Blood Ketones, Elevated And Low Blood Sugar, No Weight Loss, Slowing Fat Metabolism

Veteran health podcaster, blogger, international speaker, and bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” teams up with Toronto, Ontario Canada-based nephrologist Dr. Jason Fung from IntensiveDietaryManagement.com and Dr. Fung’s Clinical Director at his Intensive Dietary Management Program clinic Megan Ramos on this podcast dedicated to answering YOUR questions about intermittent, alternate day, and extended fasting. Jimmy and Dr. Fung are the coauthors of the 2016 international bestseller The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting and, along with Megan, are happy to provide this podcast as an additional resource for anyone curious about going on a fast to improve their health. We love hearing from our listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Megan answer your questions about all things fasting in Episode 4. FREE N=1 TRACKING TOOL AT HEADS UP HEALTH – Whether you should fast when you are sick HOT TOPIC: Can you use fasting as a way to get keto-adapted faster? Can you get keto-adapted faster with fasting? And why do you get angry on the second day of fasting? What do you do about that? Mary KEY QUOTE: “We tell patients not to stop their fast on the third day because that’s usually the hardest, but once you are keto-adapted, you can fast for as many days as you want, usually without implication, so on the third day of my fast I don’t experience any third day hump.”- Megan Ramos 1. Can blood ketones go too high while you are fasting? Hey guys, I’m 71 years old with a low BMI and no medical or h Continue reading >>

Why I Chose A Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Management

Why I Chose A Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Management

Often people use the term “diet” to mean something that is temporary for a specific purpose, usually weight loss. For me, it is a permanent way of eating now. I am a retired physician living with Type 1 diabetes since 1998. I started to exercise regularly in 2007 to help ward off complications, particularly cardiovascular disease. I was unaware at the time that aerobic exercise alone would have little impact on the development of cardiovascular disease. It wasn’t until 2011 when I contemplated doing an ironman distance triathlon, that I discovered diet is the most important determinate in the development of most chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. My research led me to begin a very low carbohydrate, ketogenic diet in February 2012. Why I Chose a Low Carb Ketogenic Diet for Diabetes Management Carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose the most, so keeping consumption low is my primary goal. Of next importance is using whole foods that naturally have the necessary micronutrients and enough complete proteins to support my exercise. I had to add fat to my meals to replace calories from the omitted carbohydrates. My protein intake did not change after starting a ketogenic low carb high fat diet. This way of eating has resulted in a significant improvement in my blood glucose control and a 1.2% reduction in HbA1c. Most importantly, the diet supplies my body with the energy, substrates, and nutrients to enable daily resistance and aerobic/endurance exercise, with minimal need for sports nutrition (sugar), or development of hypoglycemia. I completed The Great Floridian Triathlon in October 2012 without any sugar, food, or hypoglycemia thanks to my low carbohydrate ketogenic lifestyle. Nutritional Ketosis My diet keeps me in a state of nut Continue reading >>

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones and Carbohydrates: Can they co-exist? For reasons Im still struggling to understand, the idea of nutritional ketosis (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, Id like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The rule of thumb for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not net): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get into ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. Im a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one persons numbe Continue reading >>

'ketogenic' Drink Supplement Helps Control Blood Sugar, Study Finds

'ketogenic' Drink Supplement Helps Control Blood Sugar, Study Finds

Published Tuesday, February 13, 2018 8:00PM EST Last Updated Wednesday, February 14, 2018 7:07AM EST A horrible-tasting drink supplement thats been billed as a revolutionary super fuel appears to temporarily put the body into a state of ketosis and quickly bring blood sugar levels under control, new research has found. Ketosis and ketogenic diets have become hugely popular weight-loss buzzwords in in recent years, promising not only weight loss but improved endurance for athletes. Similar to the Atkins-style diets that were all the rage a decade ago, ketogenic diets are low in carbs like sugar and starch. But instead of focusing on protein, the diets stress high-fat foods, such as dairy, meats, avocados, and vegetable fats. The goal of the diet is to induce ketosis, a metabolic state in which the body stops using carbohydrates for fuel, and instead burns fat from the bodys fat stores which it turns into acids called ketones. Normally, entering ketosis takes days of adhering to a strict diet. But B.C. researchers have recently found a way to create a drink supplement that appears to do the same thing within minutes. The drink is made of ketone esters that its developers say can act as a fourth super fuel to complement the fat, protein and carbs of other foods. For this study, published Tuesday in the Journal of Physiology, University of British Columbia researchers tried to improve the taste of the beverage by adding vanilla flavour and calorie-free sweetener. But they also had to create a similarly-tasting water beverage to act as a study control to compare the two. The researchers wanted to focus on how the drinks affect insulin control. They recruited 20 healthy men and women between the ages of 18 and 35 who were asked to fast overnight and then take a standard oral Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Fundamentals

Keto Diet Fundamentals

A ketogenic diet, or “keto diet,” refers to an extremely “low-carbohydrate, high-fat” pattern of eating. This article explains the basics elements of a ketogenic diet, some of the keto diet’s benefits, the science behind ketogenic diets, some sample keto diet menus, and goes over the types of keto diet foods that you may want to incorporate into your recipe list. Ketogenic Diet Principles A ketogenic diet reduces intake of carbohydrates (approx < 5% calories) and protein (approx < 15%) of total calories and increases the amount of fat (approx > 80% calories). Importantly, restricting proteins as well as carbohydrates limits the amount of substrate available for gluconeogenesis. This is the process of making glucose from non-glucose molecules such as lactate, glycerol or protein. It can take several days of the ketogenic eating pattern before the body starts to produce ketones (become ketogenic) from fat1. When blood ketone levels exceed 0.5 mM, this is called 'ketosis.' The time taken to get into ketosis varies between individuals. A ketogenic diet is, by nature, a low carbohydrate diet, but not all low carbohydrate diets are ‘ketogenic.’ Despite this, people often group the different types of ‘low carbohydrate’ or ‘ketogenic’ diet together, this ultimately results in some confusion. Subtle differences in the macronutrients provided in the diet determine if the diet is ‘ketogenic.’ A macronutrient is something that humans consume in large quantities to provides the bulk of the energy to the body. The primary macronutrients are carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. For a diet to be ketogenic, it must be high in fat, low-moderate in protein and very low in carbohydrate. Here are some helpful definitions of diets that have an element of reduced carbo Continue reading >>

Glucose Numbers And Ketogenic Diet

Glucose Numbers And Ketogenic Diet

GLUCOSE NUMBERS and KETOGENIC DIET When eating a ketogenic diet, the most exposure to carbohydrates is overnight especially towards morning as the liver produces glucose to keep your brain fueled and to prepare you for getting up. Therefore, if you are eating a very ketogenic diet, the blood ketones go up during the day as you burn more fat for fuel (as apposed to a high carb diet where the opposite happens). Something to consider, a ketogenic diet rapidly induces insulin resistance. This is a normal physiological response to carb restriction. Carb restriction drops insulin levels. Low insulin levels activate hormone sensitive lipase. This breaks down fatty tissue into ketone bodies (blood ketones). Your muscles prefer to run on ketones and so they become insulin resistant leaving the glucose in your blood for other cells (like the brain). However, while muscles are in “refusal mode” for glucose any glucose put into your bloodstream, from food or gluconeogenesis (blood glucose made from protein or other tissues), will rapidly spike blood glucose. This is fine if you stick to LC in your eating. It also means that if you take an oral glucose tolerance test you will fail and be labelled diabetic. In fact, even a single high fat meal can do this, extending insulin resistance in to the next day. So if you are getting a blood glucose test, you can increase your carbs to 150 grams a day for 3 days prior and your blood glucose levels will show normal according to the standards. Otherwise, you can look at a better marker for metabolic syndrome which is you HbA1c levels. If these are low (5.5 or less is what a doctor will define as low diabetes risk, 5 or less is ideal), it doesn’t matter what your fasting blood glucose levels are. Also an interesting note, when mice in a r Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle tissues to store excess glucose as a molecule called glycogen and also reduces glucose production by the liver. When blood sugar is low, the hormone glucagon (produced by alpha-cells in the pancreas) stimulate cells to break down glycogen into glucose that is subsequently released into the blood stream. In healthy people who do not have type II diabetes, these functions allow levels of blood glucose and insulin to stay in a normal range. What Is Insulin Resistance and Why Is It a Problem? Unfortunately, for many Americans and other peopl Continue reading >>

How To Combat Heart Disease And Diabetes? Go Keto, Says New Study

How To Combat Heart Disease And Diabetes? Go Keto, Says New Study

A new study[1] indicates that when it comes to weight loss and regulating metabolic syndrome diseases like diabetes, a keto diet without exercise is more beneficial than the standard American diet (i.e., “standard American eating habits”) — with or without exercise. Keto diet sans exercise outperforms standard American diet with exercise The study included 30 adults previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group of risk factors (like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat) that put you at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Researchers put the adults in one of three groups: a sustained ketogenic diet with no exercise, a standard American diet (SAD) with no exercise, or a SAD with 3-5 days of exercise per week at 30 minutes a pop. Over 10 weeks, the results revealed significant changes for the keto group — particularly, as related to weight, body fat percentage, body mass index, HgA1c (a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months) and ketones. In fact, all of these variables for the keto group out-performed the other two groups. The verdict is in – a keto diet without exercise is more potent than the standard American diet with exercise when it comes to weight loss and curbing diseases. Ketosis helps you lose weight Ketosis occurs when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar or carbs for energy. That’s why the keto diet is low in carbs, moderate in protein, and high in fat. (Read more about the keto diet here.) For someone who can stand to shed extra pounds, Keto is a great long-term dietary strategy. Ketosis reverses metabolic syndrome pathologies The study shows that for someone with MetS, the body can’t convert glucose to fat in res Continue reading >>

How Low Can You Go? Expert Advice On Low Carb Diets And Diabetes

How Low Can You Go? Expert Advice On Low Carb Diets And Diabetes

Can blood sugar be better managed by following a ketogenic diet? An expert explains the benefits and the risks. Low-carb diets seem to have made a comeback—Atkins, Paleo and more recently the ketogenic diet—all follow a low carbohydrate regimen and claim greater weight loss and even improved glycemia in people with diabetes. While there is no doubt that carbohydrate restriction has the most significant improvement in blood glucose (since foods that contain carbohydrates can spike blood sugar after meals or snacks), the question remains:What is the “ideal” grams of carbohydrate for people with diabetes to consume? According to the American Diabetes Association 2017 Standards of Care, “there is no single ideal dietary distribution of calories among carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for people with diabetes." The previous recommendation of 45-60% of calories from carbs is no longer supported by evidence. Instead, the distribution of carbs, protein and fat should be individualized "while keeping total calorie and metabolic goals in mind.” What works for one person with diabetes, might not work for another. Still, ketogenic diets have gained popularity thanks to celebrities like Lebron James and Kim Kardashian claiming superior athletic performance, mental well-being, and faster weight loss. The medical community is even testing the effects of the ketogenic diet on cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The ketogenic diet seems to be trending now, but is this diet really safe for people with diabetes? Here's what the research says: What is the Ketogenic Diet? Believe it or not, ketogenic diets go back to the 1920’s and remain one of the oldest treatments for epilepsy in children. Researchers don’t know why this diet works, but it’s shown to decrease s Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Weakens Cancer Cells

How The Ketogenic Diet Weakens Cancer Cells

Chronic disease continues to ravage our world today despite tremendous advances in health care. Therapeutic approaches to treating this wide-range suffering cannot be met by technological growth in pharmacology, genetic therapy, or surgery. It should be obvious that the real solution for treating cancer and disease is not found in a man-made pill but rather is found in regulating the metabolic functions within our bodies. Western cultures today enjoy a diet rich in the delicacies that our ancestors did not consume on a regular basis such as grain, sugar, and starch. Research continues to show that sugar is the main source of fuel which feeds cancer and contributes to an inflammatory environment. Sugar essentially increases the risk for cancer and disease. How the Ketogenic Diet Works What is the Ketogenic Diet? The Eskimos and Maasai group are cultures we often look at to learn how their scant consumption of carbohydrates sustained their bodies through harsh weather conditions. It turns out that their low carb diet switched their metabolism to burn fat instead of sugar or glucose. This created a metabolic state known as ketosis, a process in which the body burns ketones to make energy, instead of relying on sugar or carbohydrate. Ketones are metabolized by fatty acids in the liver for energy. (This source of fuel is capable of crossing the blood brain barrier and is an excellent form of energy for neurons.) When the body lacks glucose, which is its first source of fuel, ketones are created in its absence. Ketosis was a beneficial process the human body developed as an adaptation to times when food was unavailable (such as for these hunter-gatherers). However, you can effectively produce ketones too by limiting the carbohydrates in your diet to less than 80 grams daily a Continue reading >>

So What Is A Keto Diet?

So What Is A Keto Diet?

So many readers ask me “What Is A Keto Diet? What Is A Keto Diet? – 101 So what exactly is the ketogenic diet? That is the question on a lot of people’s minds right now as the ketogenic diet is one of the top diet and eating plans of the year. Let’s face it, you have been seeing “Keto Diet” titles, recipes and success stories all over magazine covers, websites and everywhere in between for the last year. So again, what is keto? You may hear that it’s simply a high-fat diet or a low-carb diet, but it is not exactly either of these things. What Is A Keto Diet & LCHF Diet – Explained The ketogenic, or keto diet can be described as a very low carb and high-fat diet (LCHF). You will find that the keto diet does have similarities to other low-carb diets such as Atkins, but the keto diet is done differently. With the keto diet, you will be reducing your carbohydrates dramatically and replacing them with healthy fats. Generally, a keto diet is considered to be less than 20g carbohydrates per day, moderate protein and plenty of healthy fats. Click To Tweet Doing this will put your body into what is called nutritional ketosis, a metabolic state. This ketosis, is what allows your body to become extremely efficient at burning fat. Ketogenic diets are incredibly successful at producing stable blood sugar levels and therefore reducing insulin demand from the body. What Is A Keto Diet – Why Low-Carb? When we eat carbohydrates, they are all converted into sugars in our bodies. To keep our blood sugars from rising too high, insulin is required – whether it is produced in our body, or injected by those who cannot produce their own. Insulin regulates blood sugar but is also our fat storing hormone and helps to regulate hunger. A chronic high level of blood sugar, requi Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs Can you have high blood sugar without carbs? Well, its important to look at common beliefs about high blood sugar first. High blood sugar is bad. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Therefore carbohydrates are bad. The theory is simple, and yet incredibly flawed. The truth is, you can have chronically high blood sugar even while religiously avoiding every starch and sugar in sight. Low-carb forums are littered with posts asking a very relevant question: Why is my blood sugar so high when Im not eating any carbs? The answer is simple, yet often overlooked. The Hormone that Raises Blood Sugar: No Carbohydrates Required If the body were an engine, glucose would be its fuel. Most people think glucose only comes from carbohydrates (sugar and starch), but protein can also be turned into glucose when there arent enough carbs around to do the job. This is called gluconeogenesis, and its performed by one of the major stress hormones cortisol. When you have high cortisol levels (from diet, lifestyle, etc.), the cortisol rapidly breaks down protein into glucose, which can raise blood sugar levels considerably. For some folks, this results in chronically high blood sugareven if they are on a low-carb diet. The trouble is, cortisol isnt just breaking down the protein you eat. Its doing something far more destructive. The body is quite a smart machine, and it has no problem taking detours to get energy if necessary. If your body isnt getting the energy it needs from your diet, it has a back-up source: its own tissue. It sounds kind of cannibalistic, eating your own lean body tissue for energy. I mean, I seriously doubt any one of you would relish cutting off a chunk of your leg for dinner. I know I wouldnt. But every time your body uses c Continue reading >>

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