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High Blood Sugar On Keto

Hypoglycemia And Low-carb

Hypoglycemia And Low-carb

Many people know that low blood sugar or hypoglycemia (HG) is usually associated with persons with type-1 diabetes. Their blood sugars are often very labile –going too high and dropping too low. In this situation HG not only causes severe symptoms that diminish one’s quality of life but can be lethal. One of the benefits of carbohydrate restriction in a person with type-1 is that blood-sugar swings even out with more moderate highs and far less hypoglycemic reactions. One reason why this happens is because we are able to decrease medications including insulin that a person with type-1 diabetes must take. Reactive Hypoglycemia: Lots of People Have It The purpose of this article is to talk about reactive hypoglycemia (RHG), a far more common occurrence. It is often unrecognized and undiagnosed. It is not likely to cause death but is associated with a long list of symptoms that can interfere with everyday life. Symptoms of RHG are often treated with prescription drugs but because it is the result of lifestyle it should be treated with lifestyle changes. Reactive hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is not the opposite of diabetes (high blood sugar). It is the same condition just an earlier phase. When one eats too many carbs, especially simple sugars and starches, glucose is digested and dumps in the blood quickly. The body responds by making insulin to carry glucose into the cells for energy. Any excess glucose is stored as glycogen and when the glycogen store is full, the glucose gets stored as fat in fat cells. There are a number of factors than can lead to diabetes. If a person has a genetic risk for diabetes they are likely to be carbohydrate intolerant to some degree. This means their cells may be resistant to the effects of insulin requiring more and more to be produ Continue reading >>

Sleep Interrupted? The Blood Sugar And Sleep Connection

Sleep Interrupted? The Blood Sugar And Sleep Connection

In my last newsletter, I wrote about how most people with sleep trouble think they have too much energy and simply can’t settle down. I also discussed that one of the main causes of insomnia is actually a deep level of exhaustion. Odd as it may seem, the body needs energy to calm or sedate itself for sleep. Without energy, we stay awake, “wired and tired.” The second most common cause of insomnia is a silent blood sugar issue that affects one third of Americans. The worst part is, a shocking 90% of people are unaware of this problem until it is too late! (1) Could you or someone you know be suffering from blood-sugar-related insomnia? Keep reading to learn the facts about this troubling, little-known sleep issue. First Comes Stress, Then Come Cravings Sleep disorders affect an estimated 50-70 million Americans and, as I discussed in my last newsletter, much of this is caused by stress and exhaustion. When under stress, the adrenals go shopping for energy. Their favorite stop is the pancreas, where stress generates insatiable cravings for sweets to create the energy the adrenals can no longer provide. Before you know it, Americans are waking up to a sugar-laced cup of coffee or two. In an attempt to pick the healthy choice, we might sip green tea to keep us going through the morning. Lunch might be a salad and a diet soda. Then, as the blood sugar starts plummeting, bringing on the all-too-well-known afternoon crash, dark chocolate is passed around the office as if you had called room service. By the end of the workday, either a workout, latte or a nap is the only thing getting us home without falling asleep. The Band-aid Cure To remedy this, some of us have adopted a diet that was originally formulated for folks with severe hypoglycemia”the “six small meals a Continue reading >>

Common Concerns About Low-carb Dieting And Hypoglycemia

Common Concerns About Low-carb Dieting And Hypoglycemia

I magine that you’re a few days into your low-carb diet and when you suddenly you begin to feel “off”. You’re experiencing “brain fog”, light-headedness, weakness, and mood swings. Thoughts race through your mind. I don’t feel right…could I be hypoglycemic? Oh no, my blood sugar is low. Maybe, I should drink some fruit juice… STOP! Hold it right there! There is a better solution, but first, let’s try and figure out what may be the cause. Why am I feeling this way? When I hear someone say that they are hypoglycemic, I often raise an eyebrow. It is possible for some to experience episodes of acute hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, but that term gets tossed around more than a hot potato. In fact, the medical field uses a variety of values in glycemic control as cut-off points in order to define hypo- or hyperglycemia. The cut-off values aren’t clear-cut[1]. If you have a true underlying medical cause, such as diabetes, or some other condition, then this article isn’t intended for you. This is for the rest of the population, most of whom may not even know what a common fasting blood glucose range is. When one begins The Carb Nite® Solution, Carb Backloading™, or any other low-carb diet, there are some foreign physiological changes that can occur, and it is normal to be concerned or aware of these shifts. The “feeling” that you’re experiencing may indeed be a drop in blood sugar. Even if it’s within the normal range, you may experience the symptoms of hypoglycemia. However, there could be other reasons that you aren’t feeling optimal. Improving metabolic flexibility to use fats for fuel, namely the rate at which fat oxidation adjusts to high fat intake, can vary[2-4]. You could also be experiencing a shift in electrolytes[5]. That being s Continue reading >>

'ketogenic' Drink Supplement Helps Control Blood Sugar, Study Finds

'ketogenic' Drink Supplement Helps Control Blood Sugar, Study Finds

Published Tuesday, February 13, 2018 8:00PM EST Last Updated Wednesday, February 14, 2018 7:07AM EST A horrible-tasting drink supplement thats been billed as a revolutionary super fuel appears to temporarily put the body into a state of ketosis and quickly bring blood sugar levels under control, new research has found. Ketosis and ketogenic diets have become hugely popular weight-loss buzzwords in in recent years, promising not only weight loss but improved endurance for athletes. Similar to the Atkins-style diets that were all the rage a decade ago, ketogenic diets are low in carbs like sugar and starch. But instead of focusing on protein, the diets stress high-fat foods, such as dairy, meats, avocados, and vegetable fats. The goal of the diet is to induce ketosis, a metabolic state in which the body stops using carbohydrates for fuel, and instead burns fat from the bodys fat stores which it turns into acids called ketones. Normally, entering ketosis takes days of adhering to a strict diet. But B.C. researchers have recently found a way to create a drink supplement that appears to do the same thing within minutes. The drink is made of ketone esters that its developers say can act as a fourth super fuel to complement the fat, protein and carbs of other foods. For this study, published Tuesday in the Journal of Physiology, University of British Columbia researchers tried to improve the taste of the beverage by adding vanilla flavour and calorie-free sweetener. But they also had to create a similarly-tasting water beverage to act as a study control to compare the two. The researchers wanted to focus on how the drinks affect insulin control. They recruited 20 healthy men and women between the ages of 18 and 35 who were asked to fast overnight and then take a standard oral Continue reading >>

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones, ketosis, ketoacidosis, DKA…these are words that you’ve probably heard at one point or another, and you might be wondering what they mean and if you need to worry about them at all, especially if you have diabetes. This week, we’ll explore the mysterious world of ketones, including if and how they may affect you. Ketones — what are they? Ketones are a type of acid that the body can form if there’s not enough carbohydrate to be burned for energy (yes, you do need carbs for fuel). Without enough carb, the body turns to another energy source: fat. Ketones are made in the liver from fat breakdown. This is called ketogenesis. People who don’t have diabetes can form ketones. This might occur if a person does extreme exercise, has an eating disorder, is fasting (not eating), or is following a low-carbohydrate diet. This is called ketosis and it’s a normal response to starvation. In a person who has diabetes, ketones form for the same reason (not enough carb for energy), but this often occurs because there isn’t enough insulin available to help move carb (in the form of glucose) from the bloodstream to the cells to be used for energy. Again, the body scrambles to find an alternate fuel source in the form of fat. You might be thinking that it’s a good thing to burn fat for fuel. However, for someone who has diabetes, ketosis can quickly become dangerous if it occurs due to a continued lack of insulin (the presence of ketones along with “normal” blood sugar levels is not necessarily a cause for concern). In the absence of insulin (which can occur if someone doesn’t take their insulin or perhaps uses an insulin pump and the pump has a malfunction, for example), fat cells continue to release fat into the circulation; the liver then continues to churn Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

Keto, ketogenic diet with nutrition diagram, healthy weight loss meal plan Carbohydrate-containing foods such as bread, cereal and fruit are the body's main source of energy. When you eat these foods they turn into glucose (sugar) and the body uses that glucose as fuel. Managing the amount of carbohydrate you eat is often recommended for people with diabetes in order to avoid blood sugar spikes. Controlling or reducing carbohydrate portions can help keep blood sugar levels in the target range; for many people with type 2 diabetes weight loss (even a small amount) is also helpful. There isnt one ideal diet for everyone with diabetes. Each person can follow a completely different meal plan and still be able to achieve their blood sugar goals. Aketogenic dietcan be one way for some people with diabetes to control their blood sugars. A ketogenic diet consists of a very low level of carbohydrate: as low as 30 grams per day or less. To put it in perspective, that is equal to the amount of carbohydrate in one average-sized banana. The rest of the diet is made up of some protein (meat, fish and eggs) and mostly fat (butter, oil and cream). Is a ketogenic diet okay for people with diabetes? It seems strange that a diet so high in fat can be used by people with diabetes. However, studies have found that it can be effective for weight loss and for reducing blood sugar levels. The very low amount of carbohydrate in a ketogenic diet can be a benefit for people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes by eliminating large spikes in blood sugar and lowering the bodys demand for insulin , but it may not be right for everyone. Are there any concerns with following a ketogenic diet? The restricted amount of carbohydrate in a ketogenic diet means there is very little sugar available for the Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diabetes! Keto Os Changed Her Life!

High Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diabetes! Keto Os Changed Her Life!

Taking Keto OS and following a Ketogenic diet is helping my blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels get back in the normal range. My physical issues are improving! “My name is Terry. I am 58 years old, a wife, a grandma and I work at and own a Professional Kennel. I wanted to share my journey of my ups and downs of weight loss and gain. When I was young I was always tall and thin… Very athletic, a workaholic and could pretty well eat what I wanted. Then stress hit me hard. I became an anorexic. To me it was the only thing I felt I could control in my life. I was 5′ 6″… Weighed 103 pounds and thought I was fat. I finally got over those feelings and started eating again. I maintained a healthy weight for some years. Then stress hit me hard again and also age. I gained allot of weight. I hated myself, disliked pictures of me and hated who I saw in the mirror. This went on for allot of years. I had so many health issues. High blood pressure , diabetes, high cholesterol, physical issues (back, hip and knee) and heart problems. Then the big “C” hit me. I was diagnosed with kidney cancer. I had surgery in 2012 and was cancer free… At that time I lost 80 pounds. This was good for about a year. Then I started craving sugar. Lots of it. I soon gain allot of that weight back. I was very upset with myself as I was before. And then it happened. My dear friend invited me to her house for a meeting with Amanda and Ted Bright in Huky 2016. To hear what KETO/os and a Keto diet was all about. They provided allot of good info and sent me home with samples. With my nutritional business background it all made since to me. (I worked as a Dietary Manger in Nursing Homes for years.) So I ordered the product KETO/os orange/charged. Within 2 days I was amazed of the en Continue reading >>

The High Blood Glucose Dilemma On Low Carb (lc) Diets

The High Blood Glucose Dilemma On Low Carb (lc) Diets

If you are on a ketogenic or very low carb (VLC) diet (e.g. with 50-100gr carb/day and/or eating ketone producing MCT oils such as coconut oil), you may have a dilemma of having high Blood Glucose (BG) despite eating LC: If you are keto adapted, that is, your body is using ketones and even though you have sufficient insulin (say >5 microU/ml) your body tries to keep your BG higher than necessary, e.g. above 100-110 mg/dl. That is your BG set-point is always high. If you try to lower the set-point to say 80s, by water Intermittent Fasting (IF), then your body starts to convert your muscles into glucose to keep its high BG set-point. So, you may have a slightly lower BG, but you lose some muscle mass. Having a high set-point has many other problems, e.g. if you eat something with a little bit more carb, say a small fruit, your BG shoots up to 130s and stays there for hours. This may be due to something called "Physiological Insulin Resistance (PhIR) by Petro Dobromylskyj. He wrote many good articles about it -???thanks Petro--in his blog Hyperlipid. Apparently, PhIR is a normal reaction of the body and quite different from Pathological Insulin Resistance (PaIR). It seems that the main difference between PhIR and PaIR is that insulin is at a normal level in the former and abnormally high in the latter. (PaIR is obviously type2 diabetes.) If I understand correctly, PhIR is kind of IR only in the muscle tissue, that is only the muscles do not react to insulin and NOT use glucose even though it is available. However, if you are eating too much protein, the liver may also be considered IR, because it tries to keep the BG high by converting proteins to glucose, even though BG is already too high, that is, it also may not be responding to insulin. (I think working muscles can us Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Every minute, three people in the U.S. are diagnosed with diabetes, for a total of 20.9 million people living with the disease (as of 2011, so that number is probably even higher now). That’s up from just 5.6 million in 1980. Currently, about 7% of people in the US have diabetes, but that doesn’t actually tell the whole story. An estimated 86 million more have pre-diabetes (blood sugar high enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be diabetes. Diabetes is sometimes called a “lifestyle disease,” meaning that it’s caused by lifestyle factors like diet and exercise, rather than a particular germ or gene. It’s often (but not always!) associated with other lifestyle diseases like obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure, because the same kinds of lifestyle patterns tend to cause more than one of those problems. When the Paleo crowd starts talking about diabetes, we typically start from the fact that it’s almost unknown in traditional cultures, even among people in later middle-age. The natural suggestion from there is to eat like people in those cultures – minimal processed and refined foods. But there are a few problems with this: All those traditional groups eat differently, so who do you want to imitate, the ultra low-carb and diabetes-free Maasai, or the high-carb and equally diabetes-free Kitavans? Diet isn’t the only difference. Lifestyle factors like sleep and exercise also have a huge effect on diabetes: it’s not just food. A diet that works in the context of one lifestyle might not work in another. Prevention isn’t the same as cure. People who’ve lived in the modern world their whole lives might need more intensive intervention than people who’ve always been healthy. For a really comprehensive look at diabetes, we need to get bey Continue reading >>

So Why Exogenous Ketones With Keto//os?

So Why Exogenous Ketones With Keto//os?

Whats all this talk about EXOGENOUS KETONES!? Well my friends, if you are eating a Ketogenic/LCHF diet, you are already familiar with the incredible power of KETONES! And if you eat ANY other way, have we got good news FOR YOU! Ketones are a superior fuel source for the body than glucose! WHAT THE WHAT!!? Yup! You heard me right!! Lets go over WHY! WHAT IS KETOSIS? Ketosis is a metabolic state where the body’s energy supply comes from KETONE BODIES in the blood. This is in contrast to what we might be familiar with where the state of glycolysis is where glucose provides the enrgy source. KETOSIS is characterized by serum concentrations of KETONE BODIES over 0.5mmol with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose. KETOSIS is in contrast to KETOGENISIS or Nutritional Ketosis, which is the production of ketones in the liver through the process where ketone bodies are produced as a result of fatty acid breakdown. KETONE SUPPLEMENTATION is simply a substitute for KETOGENESIS, but only bioavailability of ketones in the blood for cellular use can create ketosis. Nutritional Ketosis usually begins at 0.5mmol and it is optimized in what many call “THE ZONE” between 2.0mmol and 3.6mmol. For those of you with friends or family who are Diabetic, Nutritional Ketosis is NOT diabetic KETOACIDOSIS. This is a serious and rare complication where uncontrolled diabetes can produce high levels of BLOOD ACID and ketones in conjunction with high levels of GLUCOSE, usually when blood BHB reached 5-6mmol or above. As a Type 1 Diabetic, I can speak from experience that nutritional ketosis and low carb eating is a huge benefit for my blood sugar control and health. KETO-ADAPTATION is the process of shifting your metabolism from dependance on glucose being your main source of energy Continue reading >>

How To Combat Heart Disease And Diabetes? Go Keto, Says New Study

How To Combat Heart Disease And Diabetes? Go Keto, Says New Study

A new study[1] indicates that when it comes to weight loss and regulating metabolic syndrome diseases like diabetes, a keto diet without exercise is more beneficial than the standard American diet (i.e., “standard American eating habits”) — with or without exercise. Keto diet sans exercise outperforms standard American diet with exercise The study included 30 adults previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group of risk factors (like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat) that put you at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Researchers put the adults in one of three groups: a sustained ketogenic diet with no exercise, a standard American diet (SAD) with no exercise, or a SAD with 3-5 days of exercise per week at 30 minutes a pop. Over 10 weeks, the results revealed significant changes for the keto group — particularly, as related to weight, body fat percentage, body mass index, HgA1c (a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months) and ketones. In fact, all of these variables for the keto group out-performed the other two groups. The verdict is in – a keto diet without exercise is more potent than the standard American diet with exercise when it comes to weight loss and curbing diseases. Ketosis helps you lose weight Ketosis occurs when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar or carbs for energy. That’s why the keto diet is low in carbs, moderate in protein, and high in fat. (Read more about the keto diet here.) For someone who can stand to shed extra pounds, Keto is a great long-term dietary strategy. Ketosis reverses metabolic syndrome pathologies The study shows that for someone with MetS, the body can’t convert glucose to fat in res Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition affecting blood sugar levels that can be managed by following a healthful diet and maintaining a healthy weight. People who are obese can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by eating a balanced, nutritious diet. Following a diet that is full of vitamins and minerals and low in added sugars and unhealthful fats can help people to lose some of the extra weight. People who lose 5-10 percent of their body weight can lower their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. For people with diabetes or people with pre-diabetes, losing the same amount of body weight can help provide a noticeable improvement in blood sugar. For some people, the ketogenic diet is an effective way to control their diabetes. It has been shown to lower blood glucose levels as well as reduce weight. Contents of this article: What is the ketogenic diet? Foods containing carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta, and fruit, are the body's main fuel source. The body breaks the food down and uses the resulting sugar (glucose) for energy. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, very low carbohydrate diet. It was initially developed and recommended for children with epilepsy. The diet recommends that people eat 30 grams (g) of carbohydrates or below per day. The goal is to eat 3 to 4 g of fat for every 1 g of carbohydrate and protein. Impact on blood sugar levels Because the ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates, there is not enough sugar available for the body to use as fuel, so it resorts to using fat. The process of breaking down fat is called "ketosis," and it produces a fuel source called ketones. A ketogenic diet helps some people with type 2 diabetes because it allows the body to maintain glucose levels at a low but healthy level. The reduced amount of carbohydrates in the diet Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Cause Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Sugar?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Cause Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Sugar?

Short Answer: It can but usually only in the first few weeks of keto and usually in only the most insulin resistant. Your Old Diet Before we get into how hypoglycemia is possible with a ketogenic diet, let’s review what happens with your blood sugar levels when you start a ketogenic diet. While you were eating your traditional high-carb Standard American Diet, you were training your body to produce a large amount of insulin with every meal. This insulin was important because the high levels pf blood glucose your diet was producing was toxic to your body so your body had to get that sugar out of the blood stream and into cells where it could be used as fuel or stored as glycogen of triglycerides. Your New Diet Now let’s look at what happens when you start a ketogenic diet. Your body continues to produce the same amount of insulin when you eat which should cause your blood sugar levels to drop so instead, your body begins to pull sugar out of all the nooks and crannies in your body where it stored it. The first reservoir to be tapped is the glycogen stored in your muscles. This stock of sugar is large enough that you can potentially go several weeks with normal blood sugars on keto but eventually those stores run out and that’s when things can get a crazy. Now for most people, by the time the stores of sugar are depleted, your body has already begun making a few of the necessary changes to your metabolism to run on fat and the feeling of being “run down” or what is sometimes called the “Keto Flu” only last a few days. The body makes the transition over to running on stored fat and ketones and you are off to the races but for a few people, especially the really insulin resistant ones, you can start to feel the symptoms of hypoglycemia. Symptoms of Hypoglycemi Continue reading >>

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