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High Blood Sugar On Keto

Fasting, Ketosis And Fat Loss

Fasting, Ketosis And Fat Loss

“…..in sixteen days, I lost 6.6 kilograms or 15 pounds…..” “….my blood sugar went down to 49 mg/dl, a dangerously low level by most medical standards…..” haha Fasting is defined as an act of willing abstinence from food for a prolonged period. The objective of a fast is to give the body a break from digesting food, though allowing the natural repair processes within the body, to take place. When food intake stops, the body is compelled to live of the energy it has stored, primarily body fat. The main purpose of having body fat is to temporarily store it as an energy source. If we did not have this storage capability, we could not sleep through the night between dinner and breakfast, without having to wake up and snack every few hours. Because body fat is the main energy source during a fast, this time period can be very effective in reducing body weight that is carried in the form of excess fat tissue. haha Within the first twenty four to forty eight hours of fasting, the body enters into a state known as ketosis. This is a natural condition where compounds called ketones start to be produced in the liver, from body fat being mobilized for energy. All of our body’s muscles and organs, aside from the brain, can use fat directly as energy. hahha haha haha hahah ah ah aha h ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah hh The only way fat can fuel the brain is when it gets converted into Ketones. Once blood sugar starts to drop, as it inevitably does during a fast as the glycogen (sugar) stores gradually become depleted, then Ketones become the only other alternate source of fuel for the brain. Ketosis is a completely natural state and an essential bodily function, especially during a fast. haha On the 12th of January 2015, I embarked on an extended fast. The main Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

A physician conducted a decade-long experiment on the health effects of a ketogenic diet, using himself as the laboratory rat; he experienced improvement in insulin sensitivity, body fat, lipids, blood sugar, and other markers A ketogenic diet requires carbohydrate and protein restriction, with 50 to 80 percent of calories coming from fats; this forces your body to shift toward using ketones as its primary fuel source, instead of glucose Although your brain is more dependent on glucose than your heart, your liver can produce a ketone-like compound that your brain can efficiently use for energy Scientists extended the lifespan of mice by 20 percent by suppressing the activity of just one gene that helps control metabolism and energy balance; this is further evidence that longevity is tied to insulin signaling The best way to jumpstart your fat-burning/ketone-producing engine is by drastically reducing your consumption of sugar and grains, fasting intermittently, and maintaining a consistent exercise routine By Dr. Mercola We are just beginning to understand the biological intricacies of aging. A growing body of research is challenging the belief that aging is beyond your control, prompting scientists to begin thinking about ways we can slow our aging clocks to a slow crawl. Although this is a relatively new branch of science, there are some factors that appear to be key in controlling how quickly you age. One major factor seems to be insulin signaling and the metabolic "engines" you have running day to day, which are largely controlled by the foods you eat. In the first featured video, Dr. Peter Attia discusses how a ketogenic diet can optimize your metabolism. But before I discuss the specifics of this, I want to tell you about a remarkable mouse study, presented in the Continue reading >>

The High Blood Glucose Dilemma On Low Carb (lc) Diets

The High Blood Glucose Dilemma On Low Carb (lc) Diets

If you are on a ketogenic or very low carb (VLC) diet (e.g. with 50-100gr carb/day and/or eating ketone producing MCT oils such as coconut oil), you may have a dilemma of having high Blood Glucose (BG) despite eating LC: If you are keto adapted, that is, your body is using ketones and even though you have sufficient insulin (say >5 microU/ml) your body tries to keep your BG higher than necessary, e.g. above 100-110 mg/dl. That is your BG set-point is always high. If you try to lower the set-point to say 80s, by water Intermittent Fasting (IF), then your body starts to convert your muscles into glucose to keep its high BG set-point. So, you may have a slightly lower BG, but you lose some muscle mass. Having a high set-point has many other problems, e.g. if you eat something with a little bit more carb, say a small fruit, your BG shoots up to 130s and stays there for hours. This may be due to something called "Physiological Insulin Resistance (PhIR) by Petro Dobromylskyj. He wrote many good articles about it -???thanks Petro--in his blog Hyperlipid. Apparently, PhIR is a normal reaction of the body and quite different from Pathological Insulin Resistance (PaIR). It seems that the main difference between PhIR and PaIR is that insulin is at a normal level in the former and abnormally high in the latter. (PaIR is obviously type2 diabetes.) If I understand correctly, PhIR is kind of IR only in the muscle tissue, that is only the muscles do not react to insulin and NOT use glucose even though it is available. However, if you are eating too much protein, the liver may also be considered IR, because it tries to keep the BG high by converting proteins to glucose, even though BG is already too high, that is, it also may not be responding to insulin. (I think working muscles can us Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Fundamentals

Keto Diet Fundamentals

A ketogenic diet, or “keto diet,” refers to an extremely “low-carbohydrate, high-fat” pattern of eating. This article explains the basics elements of a ketogenic diet, some of the keto diet’s benefits, the science behind ketogenic diets, some sample keto diet menus, and goes over the types of keto diet foods that you may want to incorporate into your recipe list. Ketogenic Diet Principles A ketogenic diet reduces intake of carbohydrates (approx < 5% calories) and protein (approx < 15%) of total calories and increases the amount of fat (approx > 80% calories). Importantly, restricting proteins as well as carbohydrates limits the amount of substrate available for gluconeogenesis. This is the process of making glucose from non-glucose molecules such as lactate, glycerol or protein. It can take several days of the ketogenic eating pattern before the body starts to produce ketones (become ketogenic) from fat1. When blood ketone levels exceed 0.5 mM, this is called 'ketosis.' The time taken to get into ketosis varies between individuals. A ketogenic diet is, by nature, a low carbohydrate diet, but not all low carbohydrate diets are ‘ketogenic.’ Despite this, people often group the different types of ‘low carbohydrate’ or ‘ketogenic’ diet together, this ultimately results in some confusion. Subtle differences in the macronutrients provided in the diet determine if the diet is ‘ketogenic.’ A macronutrient is something that humans consume in large quantities to provides the bulk of the energy to the body. The primary macronutrients are carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. For a diet to be ketogenic, it must be high in fat, low-moderate in protein and very low in carbohydrate. Here are some helpful definitions of diets that have an element of reduced carbo Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system is a defence that guards the body against bacteria, fungi or parasites. A combination of genetics and an environmental (viral infection, vaccines, low levels of vitamin D, cow’s milk or increased insulin demand) trigger engages the immune system to attack and destroy the beta cells in the pancreas. After these beta cells are destroyed, the body is unable to produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes is the result of the inability of the pancreas to produce insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces insulin. Who Gets Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes can affect all age groups. Although the thought has been that type 1 diabetes appears during childhood, current research has found that adults are just as likely to be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes; half of type 1 diabetics are diagnosed after age 30. (1) Yet, the rate of Type 1 diabetes in children, in the US, has increased by almost 60% in 11 years (2) and approximately 1 in 300 children in the US will be affected by type 1 diabetes by 18 years of age. (3) There are too many children who are effected globally. The highest rates are in northern Europe and in individuals of European decent. Men are more commonly affected in early adult life. (2) Data suggests the incidence of T1D has been increasing by 2–5% worldwide. (5) What Happens When Your Body Does Not Make Enough Insulin? Beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed by your own immune system resulting in too little or no insulin (a hormone released by the pancreas) produced. Without insulin, energy (sugar) from food cannot enter the cells. Instead of fueling the cells, this excess sugar circulates in the blood causing high blood sugar levels (also known as hyperglycemia). If there is Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance! ..... And Chocolate Brains

Insulin Resistance! ..... And Chocolate Brains

Okay, so not the sexiest topic but very timely... As we’ve got the sweetest holiday coming up in just one week, I’ve got to drop some knowledge regarding Insulin Resistance so you can keep yourself and your loved ones safe. Oh and read to the end where I give you an awesome recipe for Chocolate Brains! If you’re "meeting" me for the first time EVER, my name is Kate Jaramillo and I am a Ketogenic Lifestyle Expert, the Creator of Ketogenic Living 101, 102 and the Ketogenic Living Coach Certification, a Badass Wellness Advocate, and a #girlmom. Soooo Insulin Resistance: Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. When blood sugar levels are elevated, the pancreas runs into overdrive to create enough insulin to remove that sugar from the bloodstream. What ends up happening is that the cells build up a tolerance to the insulin being produced, they stop responding, and blood sugar levels elevate. This is Insulin Resistance. Initially, insulin resistance shows no symptoms, but eventually someone who is insulin resistant may experience weight gain mostly in the midsection (belly fat), lethargy, hormonal imbalances like irregular periods and PCOS, sleep disturbances, brain fog, high blood pressure, High triglyceride levels, which leads to heart disease and a slew of other issues, and constant hunger. Insulin resistance may develop into pre-Diabetes and Type-2 Diabetes, which will cause many other health issues and symptoms. Think you are insulin resistant? You may want to test your fasting blood glucose levels. If they are above 100, consider what you ate the night before and if it was carb and/or sugar-heavy, cut those out and test again. If you’re still hig Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

Diabetes And The Ketogenic Diet

Keto, ketogenic diet with nutrition diagram, healthy weight loss meal plan Carbohydrate-containing foods such as bread, cereal and fruit are the body's main source of energy. When you eat these foods they turn into glucose (sugar) and the body uses that glucose as fuel. Managing the amount of carbohydrate you eat is often recommended for people with diabetes in order to avoid blood sugar spikes. Controlling or reducing carbohydrate portions can help keep blood sugar levels in the target range; for many people with type 2 diabetes weight loss (even a small amount) is also helpful. There isnt one ideal diet for everyone with diabetes. Each person can follow a completely different meal plan and still be able to achieve their blood sugar goals. Aketogenic dietcan be one way for some people with diabetes to control their blood sugars. A ketogenic diet consists of a very low level of carbohydrate: as low as 30 grams per day or less. To put it in perspective, that is equal to the amount of carbohydrate in one average-sized banana. The rest of the diet is made up of some protein (meat, fish and eggs) and mostly fat (butter, oil and cream). Is a ketogenic diet okay for people with diabetes? It seems strange that a diet so high in fat can be used by people with diabetes. However, studies have found that it can be effective for weight loss and for reducing blood sugar levels. The very low amount of carbohydrate in a ketogenic diet can be a benefit for people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes by eliminating large spikes in blood sugar and lowering the bodys demand for insulin , but it may not be right for everyone. Are there any concerns with following a ketogenic diet? The restricted amount of carbohydrate in a ketogenic diet means there is very little sugar available for the Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition in which the body reacts to a perceived catastrophic drop in blood sugar. I say perceived because during an episode, the blood sugar readings may be in the normal range, but still "feel" like low blood sugar to the person having the reaction. In my experience, hypoglycemia happens to most people when first beginning a low carb, ketogenic diet. It may be especially strong in people who have already developed insulin resistance or pre-diabetes from a chronic excess of carbohydrate intake. There are different types of low blood sugar causes. Transient hypoglycemia normally happens when most people who have been eating a high carb diet drastically reduce carbohydrate intake for the first time. This type happens during the first several weeks of carb reduction because the body has not had time to create the enzymes or metabolic state to burn internal fat stores for fuel. Basically there is a gap in the amount of carbohydrate available for fuel, and the process of accessing fat stores for fuel. The lack of fuel sources results in transient low blood sugar. Reactive hypoglycemia is more of an acute reaction to a very high carb meal. For instance, when a person eats 2 or 3 glazed donuts, there is a huge spike in blood sugar and compensating insulin secretion after such a meal. The large insulin spike drives blood sugar very low several hours after the meal. How Reactive Hypoglycemia Happens Insulin, a hormone, is secreted from the pancreas in response to eating food, especially foods high in carbohydrates. Its main job is to move the sugar your body makes from the food you eat into your cells so that this excess sugar can be broken down for energy or stored. Insulin is a very powerful hormone, and it acts very quickly. The amount of insulin Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition affecting blood sugar levels that can be managed by following a healthful diet and maintaining a healthy weight. People who are obese can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by eating a balanced, nutritious diet. Following a diet that is full of vitamins and minerals and low in added sugars and unhealthful fats can help people to lose some of the extra weight. People who lose 5-10 percent of their body weight can lower their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. For people with diabetes or people with pre-diabetes, losing the same amount of body weight can help provide a noticeable improvement in blood sugar. For some people, the ketogenic diet is an effective way to control their diabetes. It has been shown to lower blood glucose levels as well as reduce weight. Contents of this article: What is the ketogenic diet? Foods containing carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta, and fruit, are the body's main fuel source. The body breaks the food down and uses the resulting sugar (glucose) for energy. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, very low carbohydrate diet. It was initially developed and recommended for children with epilepsy. The diet recommends that people eat 30 grams (g) of carbohydrates or below per day. The goal is to eat 3 to 4 g of fat for every 1 g of carbohydrate and protein. Impact on blood sugar levels Because the ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates, there is not enough sugar available for the body to use as fuel, so it resorts to using fat. The process of breaking down fat is called "ketosis," and it produces a fuel source called ketones. A ketogenic diet helps some people with type 2 diabetes because it allows the body to maintain glucose levels at a low but healthy level. The reduced amount of carbohydrates in the diet Continue reading >>

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

This past spring, after 18 months of great success on the keto diet, I tested my fasting blood sugar on my home glucose monitor for the first time in many months. The result shocked me. I had purchased the device, which also tests ketones, when I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in the fall of 2015. As I embarked on low-carb keto eating, I tested my blood regularly. Soon my fasting blood sugar was once again in the healthy range. I was in optimal ketosis day after day. Not only that, I lost 10 lbs (5 kg) and felt fantastic — full of energy with no hunger or cravings. Before long I could predict the meter’s results based on what I was eating or doing. I put the meter away and got on with my happy, healthy keto life. When my doctor ordered some lab tests this spring, I brought the meter out again. While I had no health complaints, excellent blood pressure and stable weight, she wanted to see how my cholesterol, lipids, HbA1c, and fasting glucose were doing on my keto diet — and I was curious, too. To check the accuracy of my meter against the lab results, on the morning of the test I sat in my car outside the clinic at 7:30 am, and pricked my finger. I was expecting to see a lovely fasting blood glucose (FBG) of 4.7 or 4.8 mmol/l (85 mg/dl). It was 5.8! (103 mg/dl). What? I bailed on the tests and drove home — I didn’t want my doctor warning me I was pre-diabetic again when I had no explanation for that higher result. The next morning I tested again: 5.9! (104). Huh??? For the next two weeks I tested every morning. No matter what I did, my FBG would be in 5.7 to 6.0 (102 to 106 mg/dl), the pre-diabetic range again. One morning after a restless sleep it was even 6.2 mmol/l (113 mg/dl). But my ketones were still reading an optimal 1.5-2.5 mmol/l. I was still burnin Continue reading >>

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones and Carbohydrates: Can they co-exist? For reasons Im still struggling to understand, the idea of nutritional ketosis (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, Id like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The rule of thumb for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not net): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get into ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. Im a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one persons numbe Continue reading >>

Protein Over-consumption In Ketogenic Diets Explained

Protein Over-consumption In Ketogenic Diets Explained

Protein over-consumption is one of the main issues discussed at the Ketogains Group everyday. People are always reading, hearing and/or misunderstanding that eating protein will cause gluconeogenesis and kick you out of ketosis. Tyler Cartwright splendidly refuted the claim that protein supply activates GNG in this post, I recommend you check it out. So, if protein consumption doesn’t massively increase gluconeogenesis, then two questions remain: Why doesn’t ketogains recommend you eat tons of protein? Why does protein over-consumption lower ketones? Ketogains Protein Recommendation Of these questions, the first is easier to answer. The reason we don’t advocate the consumption of tons of protein is because beyond a certain point -arguably somewhere between .8g and 1.2g per pound of lean mass(lbm)- there’s just no benefit. Protein also carries a couple of minor inconveniences: It tends to be expensive and it can cause indigestion. If there were no other reason not to over-consume protein, this would simply be enough. There is also a minor debate over whether or not protein over-consumption prolongs the adaptation phase (irrelevant if you are already adapted). Also some people argue that it may be sub-optimal for performance, but these are secondary to the previous points: It’s unnecessary to eat more, so there’s no reason to recommend over-consumption. Protein and lower ketones The second gets a bit more complicated, and touches on something that Tyler just hinted at in his article. My soapbox is diabetes, and to a lesser extent, obesity… Diabetes has a lot to tell us about blood sugar control and precisely how and why certain food items impact blood glucose. In type one diabetes, the population of beta cells in the pancreas mostly dies, leaving the alpha c Continue reading >>

So Why Exogenous Ketones With Keto//os?

So Why Exogenous Ketones With Keto//os?

Whats all this talk about EXOGENOUS KETONES!? Well my friends, if you are eating a Ketogenic/LCHF diet, you are already familiar with the incredible power of KETONES! And if you eat ANY other way, have we got good news FOR YOU! Ketones are a superior fuel source for the body than glucose! WHAT THE WHAT!!? Yup! You heard me right!! Lets go over WHY! WHAT IS KETOSIS? Ketosis is a metabolic state where the body’s energy supply comes from KETONE BODIES in the blood. This is in contrast to what we might be familiar with where the state of glycolysis is where glucose provides the enrgy source. KETOSIS is characterized by serum concentrations of KETONE BODIES over 0.5mmol with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose. KETOSIS is in contrast to KETOGENISIS or Nutritional Ketosis, which is the production of ketones in the liver through the process where ketone bodies are produced as a result of fatty acid breakdown. KETONE SUPPLEMENTATION is simply a substitute for KETOGENESIS, but only bioavailability of ketones in the blood for cellular use can create ketosis. Nutritional Ketosis usually begins at 0.5mmol and it is optimized in what many call “THE ZONE” between 2.0mmol and 3.6mmol. For those of you with friends or family who are Diabetic, Nutritional Ketosis is NOT diabetic KETOACIDOSIS. This is a serious and rare complication where uncontrolled diabetes can produce high levels of BLOOD ACID and ketones in conjunction with high levels of GLUCOSE, usually when blood BHB reached 5-6mmol or above. As a Type 1 Diabetic, I can speak from experience that nutritional ketosis and low carb eating is a huge benefit for my blood sugar control and health. KETO-ADAPTATION is the process of shifting your metabolism from dependance on glucose being your main source of energy Continue reading >>

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

If you are eating a carb-restricted diet, sooner or later, no matter how much weight you've lost or how well controlled your blood sugar has become, you are going to run into the carby treat with your name on it, and when that happens, chances are you're going to eat it. What happens next may be the single most important moment in your diet. Are you going to be taken by surprise by normal physiological changes that occur? Will you start the three month binge-from-hell that leaves you wallowing in self-hatred while you pack on all the weight you lost and more? Or will you use the experience of going off-plan to strengthen your long-term diet success? The choice is up to you. Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking When you boost your carbs above the low carbing threshold--the specific amount varies from person to person--two things will happen. You will become hungry and you will immediately gain a startling amount of weight. The reasons for your sudden weight gain are explained here. Why Carb Intake Causes Hunger Cravings The hunger is a bit more complicated, especially since it may not kick in right after you eat the carbohydrates that send you off-plan but may take a day or two to develop--when you are eating low carb again. If you experience intense hungers immediately after you eat your first carby meal, the explanation is this: After you have been low carbing for a while, your body stops producing some of the enzymes needed to digest complex starches and sugars. It takes a day or two for these to ramp back up. But in meantime, when you eat carbohydrates your blood sugar may go up a lot higher than it normally would, even if you don't usually have blood sugar problems. This is why some researchers have reported that low carbing can actually cause insulin Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe for People with Diabetes? If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, chances are you’re looking for simple yet effective ways to control your blood sugar. And, if at all possible, without the use of daily shots or medications. As I’ve mentioned in earlier blog posts, exercise is one of the best natural ways to manage blood glucose. But perhaps the most obvious way to keep blood sugar at a safe and consistent level without insulin is to pay special attention to what you eat. And, in the case of diabetes, limiting your carbohydrate intake may be the key. What Is the Keto Diet? At first glance the ketogenic (keto) diet may seem like a crazy idea for type 2 diabetics. After all, many patients are put on diets to help them lose weight. The keto diet is high in fat, but it is very low in carbs, and this combination can help change the way your body stores and uses energy. With this diet your body converts fat instead of sugar into energy, which can improve blood glucose levels while reducing the need for insulin. Ketosis VS Ketoacidosis Ketosis and ketoacidosis are two very different things, which are often confused. But it’s very important you understand the difference. What is ketoacidosis? Ketoacidosis (KA) is a life-threatening condition in which your body doesn’t make enough insulin. This causes you to have dangerously high levels of ketones (substances occurring when the body uses fat stores for energy) and blood sugar. The combination of both makes your blood incredibly acidic, and this can, in turn, change the normal functioning of your internal organs such as your liver and kidneys. Patients suffering from ketoacidosis must get treatment immediately or they could slip into a coma and even die. Ketoacidosis can develop in less than 24 Continue reading >>

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