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High Blood Sugar No Ketones

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

The human body primarily runs on glucose. When your body is low on glucose, or if you have diabetes and don’t have enough insulin to help your cells absorb the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones (chemically known as ketone bodies) are byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids. The breakdown of fat for fuel and the creation of ketones is a normal process for everyone. In a person without diabetes, insulin, glucagon, and other hormones prevent ketone levels in the blood from getting too high. However, people with diabetes are at risk for ketone buildup in their blood. If left untreated, people with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While rare, it’s possible for people with type 2 diabetes to experience DKA in certain circumstances as well. If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. These include: If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress to: a fruity breath odor stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. Testing your blood or urine to measure your ketone levels can all be done at home. At-home testing kits are available for both types of tests, although urine testing continues to be more common. Urine tests are available without a prescription at most drugstores, or you can buy them online. You should test your urine or blood for ketones when any of the following occurs: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL. You feel sick or nauseated, regardless of your blood sugar reading. To perform a urine test, you urinate into a clean container and dip the test strip into the urine. For a child who isn’t potty-trained, a pa Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Blood Sugar And Diabetes

What if I can't pay for tests and diabetes supplies? Most of the food you eat is broken down into sugar (also called glucose) and released into your bloodstream for use as your bodys main source of energy. Diabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are too high. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it is very important to keep your blood sugar numbers in your target range. You may need to check your blood sugar levels several times each day. Your pancreas releases insulin when your blood sugar goes up after eating. Insulin acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your bodys cells for use as energy. When blood sugar and insulin are high in the blood, the liver absorbs blood sugar and stores it as glycogen. The liver can turn it back into blood sugar later when its needed for energy. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, there are two ways to measure blood sugar: Blood sugar checks that you do yourself. These numbers tell you what your blood sugar level is at the time you test. Blood sugar monitoring is very important for people with diabetes. The A1C test is done in a lab or at your doctors office. The A1C test is a measure of the average blood sugar level over the past 3 months. It also helps your health care team decide the type and amount of diabetes medicine you may need. Managing your diabetes can help keep you from having other serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, poor oral health, and vision loss. A blood sugar target is the individual blood sugar range you try to reach as much as possible. Your health care team may also use the term goal. People who have diabetes have blood sugar targets for different times of the day. Your health care team will recommend a blood sugar target for you. These are typi Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin ( type 1 diabetes ) or can't respond to insulin properly ( type 2 diabetes ). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: All of these need to be b Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Diabetes Urine Tests

Diabetes Urine Tests

Urine tests may be done in people with diabetes to evaluate severe hyperglycemia (severe high blood sugar) by looking for ketones in the urine. Ketones are a metabolic product produced when fat is metabolized. Ketones increase when there is insufficient insulin to use glucose for energy. Urine tests are also done to look for the presence of protein in the urine, which is a sign of kidney damage. Urine glucose measurements are less reliable than blood glucose measurements and are not used to diagnose diabetes or evaluate treatment for diabetes. They may be used for screening purposes. Testing for ketones is most common in people with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms? This test detects the presence of ketones, which are byproducts of metabolism that form in the presence of severe hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar). Ketones are formed from fat that is burned by the body when there is insufficient insulin to allow glucose to be used for fuel. When ketones build up to high levels, ketoacidosis (a serious and life-threatening condition) may occur. Ketone testing can be performed both at home and in the clinical laboratory. Ketones can be detected by dipping a test strip into a sample of urine. A color change on the test strip signals the presence of ketones in the urine. Ketones occur most commonly in people with type 1 diabetes, but uncommonly, people with type 2 diabetes may test positive for ketones. The microalbumin test detects microalbumin, a type of protein, in the urine. Protein is present in the urine when there is damage to the kidneys. Since the damage to blood vessels that occurs as a complication of diabetes can lead to kidney problems, the microalbumin test is done to check for damage to the kidneys over time. Can urine tests be used to Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition characterized by high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), low insulin, and the presence of moderate to large amounts of ketones in the blood. It's a medical emergency that requires treatment in a hospital. If not treated in a timely fashion, ketoacidosis can lead to coma and death. While diabetic ketoacidosis (or DKA) is much more common among people with type 1 diabetes, it can also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, so ketone monitoring is something everyone with diabetes should understand. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms Signs and symptoms of ketoacidosis include: Thirst or a very dry mouth Frequent urination Fatigue and weakness Nausea Vomiting Dry or flushed skin Abdominal pain Deep breathing A fruity breath odor What Are Ketones? Ketones, or ketone bodies, are acidic byproducts of fat metabolism. It's normal for everyone to have a small amount of ketones in the bloodstream, and after a fast of 12 to16 hours, there may be detectable amounts in the urine. As is the case with glucose, if blood levels of ketones get too high, they spill over into the urine. An elevated level of ketones in the blood is known as ketosis. People who follow low-carbohydrate diets often speak of ketosis as a desirable state — it's evidence that their bodies are burning fat, not carbohydrate. But the level of ketosis that results from low carbohydrate consumption isn't harmful and is much lower than the level seen in diabetic ketoacidosis. When Should Ketones Be Monitored? Ketone monitoring is less of a concern for people with type 2 diabetes than for those with type 1 diabetes. This is because most people with type 2 diabetes still make some of their own insulin, making diabetic ketoacidosis less likely to develop. Nonetheless, people with type 2 d Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Blood sugar levels that are too high (hyperglycemia) can quickly turn into a diabetic emergency without quick and appropriate treatment. The best way to avoid dangerously high blood sugar levels is to self-test to stay in tune with your body, and to stay attuned to the symptoms and risk factors for hyperglycemia. Extremely high blood sugar levels can lead to one of two conditionsdiabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS; also called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma). Although both syndromes can occur in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, DKA is more common in type 1, and HHNS is more common in type 2. Ketoacidosis (or DKA) occurs when blood sugars become elevated (over 249 mg/dl, or 13.9 mmol/l) over a period of time and the body begins to burn fat for energy, resulting in ketone bodies in the blood or urine (a phenomenon called ketosis). A variety of factors can cause hyperglycemia ( high blood glucose ), including failure to take medication or insulin, stress, dietary changes without medication adjustments, eating disorders, and illness or injury. This last cause is important, because if illness brings on DKA, it may slip by unnoticed, since its symptoms can mimic the flu (aches, vomiting, etc.). In fact, people with type 1 diabetes are often seeking help for the flu-like symptoms of DKA when they first receive their diagnosis. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis may include: DKA is a medical emergency, and requires prompt and immediate treatment. A simple over-the-counter urine dipstick test (e.g., Ketostix) can check for ketones; anyone who has blood glucose levels above 240 mg/dl (13.3 mmol/l) should test their urine for ketones. There is also at least one glucose meter on the market that tests blood ketone levels. Continue reading >>

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

This past spring, after 18 months of great success on the keto diet, I tested my fasting blood sugar on my home glucose monitor for the first time in many months. The result shocked me. I had purchased the device, which also tests ketones, when I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in the fall of 2015. As I embarked on low-carb keto eating, I tested my blood regularly. Soon my fasting blood sugar was once again in the healthy range. I was in optimal ketosis day after day. Not only that, I lost 10 lbs (5 kg) and felt fantastic — full of energy with no hunger or cravings. Before long I could predict the meter’s results based on what I was eating or doing. I put the meter away and got on with my happy, healthy keto life. When my doctor ordered some lab tests this spring, I brought the meter out again. While I had no health complaints, excellent blood pressure and stable weight, she wanted to see how my cholesterol, lipids, HbA1c, and fasting glucose were doing on my keto diet — and I was curious, too. To check the accuracy of my meter against the lab results, on the morning of the test I sat in my car outside the clinic at 7:30 am, and pricked my finger. I was expecting to see a lovely fasting blood glucose (FBG) of 4.7 or 4.8 mmol/l (85 mg/dl). It was 5.8! (103 mg/dl). What? I bailed on the tests and drove home — I didn’t want my doctor warning me I was pre-diabetic again when I had no explanation for that higher result. The next morning I tested again: 5.9! (104). Huh??? For the next two weeks I tested every morning. No matter what I did, my FBG would be in 5.7 to 6.0 (102 to 106 mg/dl), the pre-diabetic range again. One morning after a restless sleep it was even 6.2 mmol/l (113 mg/dl). But my ketones were still reading an optimal 1.5-2.5 mmol/l. I was still burnin Continue reading >>

High Blood But No Ketone Weightloss

High Blood But No Ketone Weightloss

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community For the last week my control has gone out the window. I'd been doing really well then suddenly doing the same things has resulted in sky high blood. I'm thinking it's maybe the end of my honeymoon. I'm trying to get it back under control but it's a one step at a time process as I feel like I need to start right at the beginning so trying to get my basel right again. How is it even possible that one week 10u during the day was perfect then a week later your up at 18u and it still doesn't hold you flat! Very frustrating. Anyway the result of all this has been that my blood has been high all week. At least over 12. I've been regularly checking for ketones, I check morning, mid day and before bed and all are clear yet I've still lost weight this week. I'm not dieting, eating the same as I always have yet still lost weight. Is it possible to lose weight with high blood alone but no ketones? Thanks noblehead, that would explain it. I think it must be an end of the honeymoon as things have just gone completely wonky and there's no other factors that are different. I have been trying to get my basel right first, but it's a slow process. Going from 10u last week to 18 at the moment and still not right so will up again tomorrow. It's hard to do a proper basel test as I always seem to be high and need to do correction doses so I'm trying to get my overnight right by going to bed as low as possible and no correction but night 7 on and I'm still not right. It's exhausting because I'm up every night testing. I hate being high, it makes me feel rubbish and I feel like all I'm doing it taking loads of bolus to try and correct. Is there a better way to go about fixing Continue reading >>

Sick Day Management Tips When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

Sick Day Management Tips When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

Having a sick child can be challenging—getting time off work and securing a last-minute doctor's appointment isn't always easy. But when your sick child also happens to have type 1 diabetes, it presents a separate set of complications relating to insulin and blood glucose (blood sugar) management. This article covers some important considerations to keep in mind the next time your child with type 1 diabetes feels under the weather. Checking Blood Glucose and Ketones Even the most common ailments, such as a cold or flu, can cause your child's blood glucose levels to rise. Plus, some over-the-counter medications can cause blood glucose levels to increase even more. Complicating matters, your child's blood glucose levels may actually drop too low if he or she is vomiting or has stopped eating. You just can't be certain how an illness will affect your child's blood glucose—that's why it's important to check their levels more often than you normally would. A general guideline to shoot for is to check their blood glucose every 2 to 3 hours, but remember—that's a guideline. Your child may require more or fewer checks, depending on your health care professional's recommendations. In addition to checking blood glucose levels, you also need to check for the presence of ketones in the urine. In people with type 1 diabetes, common illnesses can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition characterized by acidic blood caused by the release of too many ketones. Ketones are released when your body doesn't have enough insulin, so it's important to check your child's urine regularly (usually every 4 hours) until there are no ketones detected. If ketones are still present, that's a sign that your child needs more insulin. There are 2 ways to check ketones: using urine ketone strips Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

A ketone test can warn you of a serious diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. An elevated level of this substance in your blood can mean you have very high blood sugar. Too many ketones can trigger DKA, which is a medical emergency. Regular tests you take at home can spot when your ketone levels run too high. Then you can take insulin to lower your blood sugar level or get other treatments to prevent complications. What Exactly Are Ketones? Everyone has them, whether you have diabetes or not. Ketones are chemicals made in your liver. You produce them when you don't have enough of the hormone insulin in your body to turn sugar (or “glucose”) into energy. You need another source, so your body uses fat instead. Your liver turns this fat into ketones, a type of acid, and sends them into your bloodstream. Your muscles and other tissues can then use them for fuel. For a person without diabetes, this process doesn’t become an issue. But when you have diabetes, things can run out of control and you build up too many ketones in your blood. If the level goes too high, it can become life-threatening. Who Needs a Ketone Test? You might need one if you have type 1 diabetes. In this type, your immune system attacks and destroys cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Without it, your blood sugar rises. People with type 2 diabetes can also get high ketones, but it isn't as common as it is with type 1. Tests can show you when your level gets high so you can treat it before you get sick. When Should You Test? Your doctor will probably tell you to test your ketones when: Your blood sugar is higher than 250 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dl) for two days in a row You're sick or you've been injured You want to exercise and your blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dl Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

Blood sugar control is at the center of any diabetes treatment plan. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is a major concern, and can affect people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes . There are two main kinds: Fasting hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 130 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) after not eating or drinking for at least 8 hours. Postprandial or after-meal hyperglycemia. This is blood sugar that's higher than 180 mg/dL 2 hours after you eat. People without diabetes rarely have blood sugar levels over 140 mg/dL after a meal, unless it’s really large. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar can cause damage to your nerves, blood vessels, and organs. It can also lead to other serious conditions. People with type 1 diabetes are prone to a build-up of acids in the blood called ketoacidosis. If you have type 2 diabetes or if you’re at risk for it, extremely high blood sugar can lead to a potentially deadly condition in which your body can’t process sugar. It's called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS). You’ll pee more often at first, and then less often later on, but your urine may become dark and you could get severely dehydrated. It's important to treat symptoms of high blood sugar right away to help prevent complications. Your blood sugar may rise if you: Eat too many grams of carbohydrates for the amount of insulin you took, or eat too many carbs in general Have an infection Are ill Are under stress Become inactive or exercise less than usual Take part in strenuous physical activity, especially when your blood sugar levels are high and insulin levels are low Early signs include: Increased thirst Trouble concentrating Frequent peeing Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blood sugar more than 180 mg/dL Ongoing high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Review your blood sugar logs to look for patterns of BG over 140-150 mg/dL. A very high BG is anything over 300 mg/dL. One very high blood sugar number, as long as you feel okay, is not an immediate cause of concern. 2 or more very high blood sugar numbers means you need to start figuring out why your number is so high. Test for ketones when you have more than two very high blood sugar numbers in a row. In general, any level over 140-150 mg/dL is a high level. You do not necessarily need to do anything about this level beyond watching to make sure that a pattern of levels at or above this range doesnt develop. If you notice that your BG levels are rising, you can call the diabetes clinic for some help in making changes to fix these levels. At some point everyone with diabetes will have a very high blood sugar level. We define very high as any level over 300 mg/dL. One very high blood sugar level is not a cause for panic. Rather, it should serve as an alarm signaling the need for additional blood glucose monitoring and depending upon how you treat your diabetes; it may also mean that you need to take some extra insulin. Very high blood sugar levels mean that the body does not have enough insulin around to use sugar as energy. Even though the level of sugar in the blood stream is very high, the body cells may be sending out the alarm that they are starving. In this case, the body will switch to burning fat as an energy source. This is a problem because excess burning creates byproducts such as ketones and acids. After several hours the blood can become too acidic for the body organs to work right. This leads to a life-threatening diabetes emergency called Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Full-blown DKA must be treated in a hospital, often in the Intensive Care Unit. It is im Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose (hyperglycemia) And Ketones

High Blood Glucose (hyperglycemia) And Ketones

Chapter 9: High Blood Glucose (Hyperglycemia) and Ketones High Blood Glucose (Hyperglycemia) and Ketones Hyperglycemia (said like: hi per glie SEE mee ah) is also called high blood glucose. It happens when blood glucose numbers are higher than 120 mg/dl. Eating more carbohydrates than you calculated for your insulin dose Give the right insulin dose based on your meal and blood glucose number. Change the insulin doses when you see a pattern of high blood glucose levels. Give insulin for all the carbohydrate you eat. How will I Feel when My Blood Glucose is High? Need to get up at night to go to the bathroom What Should I do if My Blood Glucose is High? Drink fluids that do not have carbohydrates. Try to drink 1 full glass (8 ounces) every 30 to 60 minutes. Use the high blood glucose correction dose. Check your urine or blood for ketones if blood glucose is higher than 300 mg/dl. High blood glucose, by itself, is not an emergency. High blood glucoseandsmall, moderate, or large ketones IS something you should take care of right away. You need glucose in every cell in your body to use for energy. Your body needs glucose and insulin in your blood. When there is not enough glucose or not enough insulin, your cells will not have glucose to use for energy. When Cells do not Have Glucose to Use for Energy: Ketones are made when fat is used for energy. Ketones are in the blood and in the urine. What 2 things does Your Body Need to Prevent Ketones? _________________________________________________________ Dip the test strip into the cup (Picture 1). Match the color on the strip to the colors on the bottle (Picture 2 and 3). NOTE: There are some blood glucose meters that are able to measure ketones in a drop of blood if using a special test strip specific to check ketones. Picture Continue reading >>

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