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High Blood Sugar Ketosis

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

Ketones are an acid remaining when the body burns its own fat. When the body has insufficient insulin (or cannot use sufficient insulin), it cannot get glucose (sugar) from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy and will instead begin to burn fat stores. When the body is burning too much fat, it may cause ketones to become present as by product shown in your urine. Burning fat instead of glucose can lead to a condition called ketosis. It can make you feel poorly, with lack of energy. If you have healthy or low BMI it can also be dangerous as you may also lose too much weight. Testing for ketones Your urine is usually tested for ketones during your diabetes clinic appointments. You may also be tested for ketones if you have been taken into hospital with high blood sugar levels. Ketones are detected by testing the urine with a dip stick. They are measured on a scale with 0 being lowest and 4++ being the highest. The test sticks can be purchased from a pharmacy or online and in some cases you may be prescribed test strips for home testing for if you get blood sugar levels over a certain level. Your diabetes midwife will usually complete ketone tests when you attend clinic appointments, so it is not necessary to purchase dip sticks for home use unless you're advised to by a medical professional. Blood ketones can also be tested and are much more accurate than the urine dip sticks. Type 1 diabetics may be given ketone blood testing monitors. Why are ketones common in ladies diagnosed with gestational diabetes? Ketones can be detected when you have not eaten for a long period of time and may be found in samples taken in the morning due to fasting overnight. It is common for mothers with gestational diabetes to develop ketones due to limiting too many carbohydrates f Continue reading >>

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29 million people in America have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Insulin resistance is recognized as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. But what causes insulin resistance? In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger talks about how fat affects insulin resistance, and about how the most effective way to reduce insulin sensitivity is to reduce fat intake. We’ve also provided a summary of Dr. Greger’s main points below. Insulin Resistance of People on High-Fat Diets vs. High-Carb Diets In studies performed as early as the 1930s, scientists have noted a connection between diet and insulin intolerance. In one study, healthy young men were split into two groups. Half of the participants were put on a fat-rich diet, and the other half were put on a carb-rich diet. The high-fat group ate olive oil, butter, mayonnaise, and cream. The high-carb group ate pastries, sugar, candy, bread, baked potatoes, syrup, rice, and oatmeal. Within two days, tests showed that the glucose intolerance had skyrocketed in the group eating the high-fat diet. This group had twice the blood sugar levels than the high-carb group. The test results showed that the higher the fat content of the diet, the higher the blood sugar levels would be. What Is Insulin Resistance? It turns out that as the amount of fat in the diet goes up, so does one’s blood sugar spikes. Athletes frequently carb-load before a race because they’re trying to build up fuel in their muscles. We break down starch into glucose in our digestive tract; it circulates as blood glucose (blood sugar); and it is then used by our muscle cells as fuel. Blood sugar, though, is like a vampire. It needs an invitation to enter our cells. And that invit Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance! ..... And Chocolate Brains

Insulin Resistance! ..... And Chocolate Brains

Okay, so not the sexiest topic but very timely... As we’ve got the sweetest holiday coming up in just one week, I’ve got to drop some knowledge regarding Insulin Resistance so you can keep yourself and your loved ones safe. Oh and read to the end where I give you an awesome recipe for Chocolate Brains! If you’re "meeting" me for the first time EVER, my name is Kate Jaramillo and I am a Ketogenic Lifestyle Expert, the Creator of Ketogenic Living 101, 102 and the Ketogenic Living Coach Certification, a Badass Wellness Advocate, and a #girlmom. Soooo Insulin Resistance: Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. When blood sugar levels are elevated, the pancreas runs into overdrive to create enough insulin to remove that sugar from the bloodstream. What ends up happening is that the cells build up a tolerance to the insulin being produced, they stop responding, and blood sugar levels elevate. This is Insulin Resistance. Initially, insulin resistance shows no symptoms, but eventually someone who is insulin resistant may experience weight gain mostly in the midsection (belly fat), lethargy, hormonal imbalances like irregular periods and PCOS, sleep disturbances, brain fog, high blood pressure, High triglyceride levels, which leads to heart disease and a slew of other issues, and constant hunger. Insulin resistance may develop into pre-Diabetes and Type-2 Diabetes, which will cause many other health issues and symptoms. Think you are insulin resistant? You may want to test your fasting blood glucose levels. If they are above 100, consider what you ate the night before and if it was carb and/or sugar-heavy, cut those out and test again. If you’re still hig Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: not taking insulin severe infection severe illness bad insulin In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also freque Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetic Diet For Controlling Blood Sugar

The Best Diabetic Diet For Controlling Blood Sugar

A Diabetic Diet for Controlling Blood Sugar Following the correct diabetic diet is particularly important since many of the complications of diabetes are caused by high blood sugar levels. The correct diet for a diabetic is one that: helps diabetics stabilize and control blood sugar instead of making blood sugar control worse. In many cases, a type 2 diabetic diagnosis can be successfully overcome with a change in diet. In Type 1 diabetes, in which insulin must be injected, many of the complications of the blood sugar highs and lows can be minimized, and lower doses of insulin can be used if the proper diabetic diet is followed and blood sugar control is maintained. Any serious research and study will point to the fact that a ketogenic diet or a similiar low carb diet is extremely successful in lowering and stabilizing blood sugar values, and as such, is the most effective diabetic diet to follow. Here are just a few of many studies which showcase the effect of a low carb, ketogenic diet on blood sugar control: In a 2004 study published in Diabetes journal , participants were given either the American Diabetes Association recommended moderately high carb diet or a low carb diet. The mean 24-hour blood sugar reading at the end of the ADA high carb diet was 198 mg/dl. This is deep into diabetic diagnosis territory. The mean 24-hour blood sugar of the participants at the end of the low carb diet was 126 mg/dl. The low carb diet resulted in a drop of 36% in mean blood sugar readings when compared to the moderate carb diet over the course of the study. Another gold standard metabolic ward study examined the effects of a low carb ketogenic (high fat) diet in obese persons with type 2 diabetes. Ten subjects were monitored while eating their usual diet for 7 days and then whil Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

A physician conducted a decade-long experiment on the health effects of a ketogenic diet, using himself as the laboratory rat; he experienced improvement in insulin sensitivity, body fat, lipids, blood sugar, and other markers A ketogenic diet requires carbohydrate and protein restriction, with 50 to 80 percent of calories coming from fats; this forces your body to shift toward using ketones as its primary fuel source, instead of glucose Although your brain is more dependent on glucose than your heart, your liver can produce a ketone-like compound that your brain can efficiently use for energy Scientists extended the lifespan of mice by 20 percent by suppressing the activity of just one gene that helps control metabolism and energy balance; this is further evidence that longevity is tied to insulin signaling The best way to jumpstart your fat-burning/ketone-producing engine is by drastically reducing your consumption of sugar and grains, fasting intermittently, and maintaining a consistent exercise routine By Dr. Mercola We are just beginning to understand the biological intricacies of aging. A growing body of research is challenging the belief that aging is beyond your control, prompting scientists to begin thinking about ways we can slow our aging clocks to a slow crawl. Although this is a relatively new branch of science, there are some factors that appear to be key in controlling how quickly you age. One major factor seems to be insulin signaling and the metabolic "engines" you have running day to day, which are largely controlled by the foods you eat. In the first featured video, Dr. Peter Attia discusses how a ketogenic diet can optimize your metabolism. But before I discuss the specifics of this, I want to tell you about a remarkable mouse study, presented in the Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Ketosis

Blood Sugar And Ketosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community benjo123456 Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member Hi. Sorry about all the questions, but I can't find the answer elsewhere on the internet: What happens to our blood sugar reading if we are in ketosis and adjusted to fat burning? Will it simply settle on a level and then stop there, or will the ketones we produce naturally raise blood sugar levels? usually hovers around 4-5.5mmols BG, sometimes* lower depending on activty anything above <0.3mmol ketones u will be in the start of ketosis diamondnostril Type 1 Well-Known Member Hi. Sorry about all the questions, but I can't find the answer elsewhere on the internet: What happens to our blood sugar reading if we are in ketosis and adjusted to fat burning? Will it simply settle on a level and then stop there, or will the ketones we produce naturally raise blood sugar levels? Blood-sugar levels will generally stay a bit lower than what is considered to be "normal", when in dietary Ketosis. Gluconeogenesis (release of Glycogen from the liver) will keep the blood-sugar levels up to where the body needs them to be, in the absence of much dietary Carbs. The attached file is an excerpt from "The Ketogenic Diet" by Lyle McDonald, a very big and thorough book about the topic. I have found this book extremely useful. If you have lots of questions about the Keto diet then perhaps it's useful to you too? I have the book as a PDF file if you'd like me to send to you. Let me know if so. Continue reading >>

Type Of Fuel Affects Frequency Of Eating; When Not To Use Intermittent Fasting

Type Of Fuel Affects Frequency Of Eating; When Not To Use Intermittent Fasting

You might have heard from the paleo community or a personal trainer about the wonderful benefits of Intermittent Fasting and how it can be a tool to speed body fat loss. When looking at the diet and eating patterns of our ancestors it is clear that they would have gone through periods of prolonged fasting while hunting and or gathering for food. During this time stored body fat can be utilized for fuel to provide energy and keep blood sugar stabilized or reduced demand of blood sugar by using ketone bodies as primary fuel. It is important to consider the times in which Intermittent Fasting is appropriate to promote fat loss and when is can actually be counterproductive. WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT “FUEL” SOURCES FOR THE BODY? In a Ketogenic state where the body is using ketone bodies from the breakdown of fat for fuel; intermittent fasting can be a wonderful supplement or tool to speed fat loss. The Ketogenic diet is a diet high in healthy fats such as grassfed butter, nuts and seeds, coconut oil, avocado, moderate in protein and very low in carbohydrates (less than 30 grams per day coming from residual carbs in non-carb dominant foods such as those in non-starchy veggies, nuts, seeds, etc). Reducing intake of carbohydrates from the diet allows for the body to switch from its preferred source of fuel, glucose (from the breakdown of carbohydrates) to using fat for fuel. This utilization or “training” of the body to use fat for fuel leads to a quicker rate of breakdown of stored body fat than with a typical low calorie diet. In people that are non-ketogenic (anyone not consistently following the strict low carb diet), their bodies will dump glucose from the liver when not eating to reduce a blood sugar crash! Both low blood sugar and high blood sugar are regulated by h Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes: Does It Work?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition affecting blood sugar levels that can be managed by following a healthful diet and maintaining a healthy weight. People who are obese can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by eating a balanced, nutritious diet. Following a diet that is full of vitamins and minerals and low in added sugars and unhealthful fats can help people to lose some of the extra weight. People who lose 5-10 percent of their body weight can lower their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. For people with diabetes or people with pre-diabetes, losing the same amount of body weight can help provide a noticeable improvement in blood sugar. For some people, the ketogenic diet is an effective way to control their diabetes. It has been shown to lower blood glucose levels as well as reduce weight. Contents of this article: What is the ketogenic diet? Foods containing carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta, and fruit, are the body's main fuel source. The body breaks the food down and uses the resulting sugar (glucose) for energy. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, very low carbohydrate diet. It was initially developed and recommended for children with epilepsy. The diet recommends that people eat 30 grams (g) of carbohydrates or below per day. The goal is to eat 3 to 4 g of fat for every 1 g of carbohydrate and protein. Impact on blood sugar levels Because the ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates, there is not enough sugar available for the body to use as fuel, so it resorts to using fat. The process of breaking down fat is called "ketosis," and it produces a fuel source called ketones. A ketogenic diet helps some people with type 2 diabetes because it allows the body to maintain glucose levels at a low but healthy level. The reduced amount of carbohydrates in the diet Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes: What I Eat

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes: What I Eat

I recently began writing about the ketogenic diet and type 1 diabetes in an attempt to optimize my blood sugar in relationship to athletic performance. This podcast episode can provide some additional perspective about how I arrived at the ketogenic diet for type 1 diabetes. It started with a low-fat plant-based diet and I have recently changed my approach (dramatically) to a Ketogenic diet (low-carb, high-fat). The results have been remarkable and I feel like this dietary approach is a worthwhile consideration for anyone who is in a position to optimize their diabetes management–or who just wants better energy with no “crashes” throughout the day. In case my standpoint isn’t obvious, let me clarify, there is no should or shouldn’t implied in my writing about this or any other diet. Some people eat pizza. Some people drink diet soda. Some never consume either–or do but always feel guilty. Still others know the drawbacks and act in moderation and feel great about it. My goal is to inform those who are interested in trying something new or just knowing what else is out there–not to persuade those who are happy with an already satisfactory approach. I wrote an eBook compiling my experiments with the ketogenic diet and type 1 diabetes which you can check out here: In my last blog I focused on the comparative results between the two diets, and this blog will hopefully answer the one major question I got–‘what do you eat on a daily basis?’ Not all low-carb diets are Ketogenic, but the Ketogenic diet is low-carb. In the coming weeks I will be sharing more about how my transition to this diet came together as well as mistakes I made along the way. I will also probably put up a post along the lines of “What is a Ketogenic diet?” although that is lower pri Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Does Long Term Ketosis Cause Insulin Resistance?

Does Long Term Ketosis Cause Insulin Resistance?

“It’s a snake.” “It’s a wall.” “It’s a rope.” “It’s a fan.” “It’s a tree.” “It’s insulin resistance.” I’ve always been fascinated by those describing a “new finding” in medicine. I am reminded of the story of 5 men who, never having seen an elephant before, were blindfolded and asked to describe what he discovered. However, each man was introduced to a different part of the elephant. Each of them had a dramatically different description of the elephant and each made a conclusion that was very different from the others. What is fascinating, is that we usually make our “blindfolded comparisons” to those things we have seen or about which we have some descriptive understanding. Observing and describing human physiology is much like examining an elephant while blindfolded for the first time. This week’s “blind-folded finding” is what has been interpreted by some as “insulin resistance” made worse by a ketogenic diet. Really? This perked my curiosity, because I’ve personally been following a low-carbohydrate/ketogenic diet for 10 years and have thousands of patients doing the same. To this day, I’ve never seen insulin resistance “get worse.” In fact, it gets better. Clinically, it seems to take about 18-24 months to improve, but, it usually gets better. THE QUESTION – I’ve had three people from around the world contact me this week and ask why, after being on a ketogenic diet and “in ketosis,” they suddenly get a notably large blood glucose spike when they cheat. By notably large, I mean that their blood sugars rise to over 200 mg/dl within 2 hours of a carbohydrate containing meal. Now, they admit to rapid glucose recovery within an hour or two, and their hemoglobin A1c levels are subjectively normal (l Continue reading >>

How To Control The Dawn Phenomenon

How To Control The Dawn Phenomenon

If you had asked me a year ago how to control the dawn phenomenon in Type 2 diabetes you’d have stumped me. Why? Well because even though I was helping folks online through health forums, I wasn’t coaching anyone “live” because it really makes a huge difference between what you know versus what actually works for the client. Once I started coaching folks live – getting on the phone with them, talking with them through Skype, emailing them and texting them via WhatsApp, looking through and scrutinizing their food journals and daily blood glucose readings week after week, I began to realize that many of them have what is known as the dawn phenomenon i.e. high fasting blood glucose in the mornings with lower blood glucose readings the rest of the day. What is the Dawn Phenomenon? Many folks with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes find that their fasting blood glucose spikes in the morning and are much harder to control than their post-grandial (post meal) blood glucose. And sometimes they find that when they eat the same foods during breakfast, lunch and dinner, they find their post grandial readings after breakfast higher than before. This isn’t limited to just folks with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It seems that some healthy people also get it but their blood sugar spikes are much less pronounced and stay within the normal range so it doesn’t get picked up by the blood glucose monitor. What Causes the Dawn Phenomenon? According to WebMD, the dawn phenomenon or dawn effect is the result of several natural body changes that happen while you’re asleep. Between 3 am and 8 am, your body starts to ramp up the amounts of certain hormones that work against insulin’s action to drop blood sugar levels. These hormones are the growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon and ad Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Ketogenic Dieters! Plus A Special Surprise (hint: Genotypes And Metabolism)!

High Blood Sugar In Ketogenic Dieters! Plus A Special Surprise (hint: Genotypes And Metabolism)!

A while ago Michael and I were discussing future article topics. There are truly a plethora of avenues to go down in this area of research and there is no lack of things to research and comment on. But even though I have a couple of pretty cool MCT articles sitting around on my desk, I want an interesting topic. I want something new. Something challenging. Besides, everyone is drinking the MCT koolaid these days. It’s become passe. (Also, it upsets my stomach and I have a personal vendetta against it. So there.) What’s new? There has to be something new! Michael pointed me to one of his old articles on physiological insulin resistance as an idea. I brushed it off at first. Dismissed it as a quirk. But then I thought about it. WHY does blood glucose rise in response to a low carb diet? It truly is an interesting question. What does it say about low carb diets if they induce an almost diabetic effect on circulating glucose? Thus my research began. This short abstract confirmed that it is normal for people on low carb diets to experience a rise in blood glucose levels. Because it’s a non-open journal (shame!), there’s a one-sentence explanation given: A decrease in first-phase insulin secretion may partially contribute to the short-term LC/HFD-induced increase in postprandial plasma glucose levels. First phase insulin secretion? There’s a first phase? So… There’s more than one phase to insulin secretion? I had no idea. Call me ignorant but I had no idea until this point that there was more than one phase to insulin secretion. This article delves deeper into the signaling involved in (what I learned is called) biphasic insulin secretion. The first phase of insulin secretion lasts approximately 10 minutes, and the second phase of insulin secretion picks up afte Continue reading >>

12 Steps To Beat Diabetes Naturally

12 Steps To Beat Diabetes Naturally

12 Steps to Beat Diabetes Naturally: Diabetes is a modern day epidemic with the American Diabetes Association claiming 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) have diabetes and another 86 million people (18.8%) have insulin-resistant pre-diabetes (1). The vast majority of diabetes is the type II variety known as degenerative diabetes. Research has shown that degenerative diabetes is an inflammatory disorder and is completely preventable & reversible through an anti-inflammatory lifestyle. When we eat sugar or carbohydrates our digestive system converts these larger molecules into glucose which is then absorbed into the bloodstream and taken to every cell of the body. Blood sugar fuels the cells keeping them healthy. For healthy function it is critical to maintain stable blood sugar levels. In this article, you will discover 12 steps to beat diabetes naturally. Diabetes and Your Blood Sugar: Diabetes is classically diagnosed by one of three different mechanisms. Hemoglobin A1C (Hg A1C): This is a form of hemoglobin (Hg) or red blood cell that is measured to identify the average plasma glucose concentration over a 3 month period of time. When Hg is exposed to plasma glucose there is a glycation reaction that takes place. As blood sugar increases the fraction of glycated Hg increases. Healthy HgA1C levels are considered below 5.7 although most functional medicine doctors like to see them below 5.4. Hg A1C levels above 6.5 are clinically diagnosed as diabetes mellitus. From 5.7-6.5 it is considered pre-diabetic. Fasting Plasma Glucose Test (FPG): This test measures fasting morning blood sugar levels. The individual is instructed not to eat any food within 12 hours of the test. So the individual typically told to skip breakfast and the test is usually performed in th Continue reading >>

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