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Hhs Vs Dka

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Hyperglycemic crises: Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HHNK) versus DKA. See DKA video here: https://youtu.be/r2tXTjb7EqU This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/g... Voice by: Penelope Hammet Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or HHS, is another ACUTE and life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. It develops slower than DKA, typically in the course of several days, but has a much higher mortality rate. Like DKA, HHS is triggered when diabetic patients suffer from ADDITIONAL physiologic stress such as infections, other illness, INadequate diabetic treatment or certain drugs. Similar to DKA, the RISE in COUNTER-regulatory hormones is the major culprit. These hormones

Hyperglycemic Emergencies: Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemia State

Hyperglycemic emergencies: diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemia state Diabetes Spectrum. January 2002 vol. 15 no. 1 28-36 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), the hallmark of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS), primarily seen in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), are hyperglycemic emergencies that may lead to death if untreated. They are both associated with: Insulin deficiency (absolute in T1DM and relative in T2DM) and hyperglycemia Diabetes Care. 2015 Sep; 38(9): 16871693. DKA can very rarely occur with normal glucose levels, particularly in the setting of prior insulin use or pregnancy. This has been a known complication with the rise in the usage of SGLT2i (sodium glucose transporter type 2 inhibitors) class of medications. Renal wasting of glucose does not allow for serum glucose to rise to the levels seen in DKA and HHS. Curr Diabetes Rev. 2013 Jan 1; 9(1): 2553. Clin Biochem Rev. 2005 May; 26(2): 1939. Insulin, a peptide hormone, is produced by the beta-islet cells in the pancreas. Major functions of insulin include increased glucose uptake by the peripheral tissues (liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue), enhancing glycogenesis, a Continue reading >>

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  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/he...) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/...) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Matthew McPheeters. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep... Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep... NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in a

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Author: Dipa Avichal, DO; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) isone of two serious metabolic derangements that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). [ 1 ] It is alife-threatening emergency that, although less common than its counterpart, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), has a much higher mortality rate, reaching up to 5-10%. (See Epidemiology.) HHS was previously termed hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic coma (HHNC); however, the terminology was changed because coma is found in fewer than 20% of patients with HHS. [ 2 ] HHS is most commonly seen in patients with type 2DM who have some concomitant illness that leads to reduced fluid intake, as seen, for example, in elderly institutionalizedpersons with decreased thirst perception andreduced ability to drink water. [ 3 ] Infection is the most common preceding illness, but many other conditions, such as stroke or myocardial infarction, can cause this state. [ 3 ] Once HHS has developed, it may be difficult to identify or differentiate it from the antecedent illness. (See Etiology.) HHS is characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperosmolarity, and dehydration without significant ketoac Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS or HHS) nursing diabetes & pathophysiology NCLEX review on endocrine disorders of the body. HHNS vs DKA are two complications of diabetes mellitus. HHNS presents with extreme hyperglycemia (blood glucose greater than 600 mg/dL) and dehyrdation. Ketones and acidosis are not present in this condition as with diabetic ketoacidosis. The hyperglycemia hyperosmolar state can lead to a coma and even death if not treated promptly. HHNS treatment includes intravenous fluids, insulin therapy,and electrolyte replacement. This video will highlight the patho, causes, signs and symptoms, and nursing interventions for HHS. Please see the previous videos on DKA and DKA vs HHS (see the playlist below) Quiz on HHNS: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Lecture Notes for this Video: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Diabetes Lecture Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, sala

Dka Vs Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (hhs)

Don't miss your chance to win free admissions prep materials! Click here to see a list of raffles . DKA vs Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) why is plasma osmolarity (Posm) always high in HHS, whereas DKA Posm is variable? Pathogenesis of DKA and HHS are discussed in the same article in uptodate but the Posm difference between the 2 is not clearly explained (at least to my feeble mind). The increase in plasma osmolality created by hyperglycemia pulls water out of the cells, expands the ECF, and thereby reduces the plasma sodium (Na) concentration. If a patient with normal serum electrolytes (Na = 140 mEq/L) rapidly developed a glucose concentration of 1000 mg/100 mL, and no urine was made, then that patients serum Na would fall to value between 119 and 126 mEq/L and the osmolality would increase to a level between 294 and 308 mosm/L. However, the osmolality usually increases to a greater degree because a large volume of relatively electrolyte-deficient urine is excreted during the evolution of the hyperglycemic state. The loss of this electrolyte-free water further raises the osmolality . In patients with ketoacidosis, high plasma acetone levels also contribute to the elevate Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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