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Freestyle Optium Ketone Test Strips Singapore

Abbott's New Precision Neo Meter Lacks Features, Aims To 'skip The Copay'

Abbott's New Precision Neo Meter Lacks Features, Aims To 'skip The Copay'

If a glucose meter could make cappuccino, I’d be all over that. That's what I expected with Abbott Diabetes Care’s newest meter, the FreeStyle Precision Neo, launched here in the States earlier this Spring. But sadly, the meter doesn’t deliver on the promise of delivering my metaphoric cappuccino. It hardly even brews drip coffee, if we’re keeping to the caffeine analogy. An international version of this meter has been available outside the U.S. for more than a year, going by the FreeStyle Optimum Neo name, and the FreeStyle Precision Neo finally made it to the American market in mid-April following FDA regulatory approval last fall. Since both go by the “Neo” name, you might think this Americanized version would offer the same features as its international cousin does -- checking glucose, testing blood ketones, tracking insulin, and warning us of high or low patterns. But that’s not the case, unfortunately. The Precision Neo is as skinny as a supermodel and looks pretty good for a glucose meter, but that’s about all it has going for it. Once again, as it has done in the past, Abbott has castrated an innovative device for the American market by eliminating the bells and whistles that made it special. The reason, according to Abbott, is by design: they’re marketing this to people with diabetes in the States who don’t want to fuss with insurance, or worry about excessive copays or high costs of test strips. The lower-cost Precision Neo goes for $22 to $28 for the meter itself, and the strips range from $14 to $17 for a box of 25. Of course, lower-cost meters and strips have been around in some stores for a long time, but traditionally they haven’t been from the big-name brands. Not until recently, that is. With this Precision Neo meter targeted at th Continue reading >>

Hsa Alerts Public On Abbott's Voluntary Recall Of Medisense Optium™ Blood Glucose Test Strips

Hsa Alerts Public On Abbott's Voluntary Recall Of Medisense Optium™ Blood Glucose Test Strips

The Health Sciences Authority (HSA) is overseeing the voluntary market recall of 43 affected lots of Abbott MediSense Optium™ Blood Glucose Test Strips by Abbott Laboratories (S) Pte Ltd. The blood monitoring device is not affected by this recall. 2 The affected test strips may give inaccurate results to diabetic patients, showing readings that are lower than their actual blood sugar level. This could lead to patients failing to control and manage their actual blood glucose adequately due to the inaccurate reading. 3 Based on information provided by the company, the probable reason behind the inaccurate readings is related to the test strips taking a longer than expected time to absorb the blood from the patients' finger, which could lead to inaccurate low readings of their blood sugar levels. This may be dependent on the prolonged storage of the strips and their exposure to higher temperatures (exceeding 30°C) for an extended period of time. 4 Abbott Laboratories (S) Pte Ltd has imported into Singapore 43 affected lots. There are three pack sizes of 25, 50 or 100 test strips per box in the affected lots. The 43 affected lot numbers are on the Annex 1 attached. Globally, there may be additional lots that are affected. 5 Abbott Laboratories (S) Pte Ltd has initiated a voluntary recall of the affected lots. This recall is expected to be completed within a week. Public Advisory 6 HSA advises that: • Patients who have purchased Abbott MediSense Optium™ Blood Glucose Test Strips in Singapore, to stop using the affected lots (as listed in the attached Annex 1) and seek replacement of unaffected batches • Patients who have purchased their strips overseas, to check with Abbott Laboratories S Pte Ltd if the test strips are from the affected lots • Patients who have us Continue reading >>

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