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Fat Metabolism Without Ketosis

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Consultation? - http://www.ThomasDeLauer.com Saturated Fats and Ketosis | Are Saturated Fats Safe and How Much to Have: Thomas DeLauer Saturated fats are common in the American diet They are shelf-stable, resistant to heat damage (solid at room temperature — think cooled bacon grease,) and essential to many bodily functions Roughly half of our cell membrane structure is composed of saturated fat, and saturated animal fats, like butter or fatty organ meats, contain huge amounts of essential fat-soluble vitamins (K2, A, D, among others) Common sources of saturated fat include red meat, whole milk and other whole-milk dairy foods, cheese, coconut oil, and many commercially prepared baked goods and other foods The word "saturated" refers to the number of hydrogen atoms surrounding each carbon atom The chain of carbon atoms holds as many hydrogen atoms as possible — it's saturated with hydrogens Saturated Fats Bad Rep The fear of saturated fat began in the 1950s when Ancel Keys published a paper supposedly linking saturated fat/cholesterol with rising rates of heart disease The theory - called lipid hypothesis - proposed that there was a direct relationship between the amount of sat

Differential Metabolic Effects Of Saturated Versus Polyunsaturated Fats In Ketogenic Diets

Ketogenic diets (KDs) are used for treatment of refractory epilepsy and metabolic disorders. The classic saturated fatty acid-enriched (SAT) KD has a fat:carbohydrate plus protein ratio of 4:1, in which the predominant fats are saturated. We hypothesized that a polyunsaturated fat-enriched (POLY) KD would induce a similar degree of ketosis with less detrimental effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Twenty healthy adults were randomized to two different weight-maintaining KDs for 5 d. Diets were 70% fat, 15% carbohydrate, and 15% protein. The fat contents were 60 or 15% saturated, 15 or 60% polyunsaturated, and 25% monounsaturated for SAT and POLY, respectively. Changes in serum β-hydroxybutyrate, insulin sensitivity (SI), and lipid profiles were measured. Mean circulating β-hydroxybutyrate levels increased 8.4 mg/dl in the POLY group (P = 0.0004), compared with 3.1 mg/dl in the SAT group (P = 0.07). SI increased significantly in the POLY group (P = 0.02), whereas total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased significantly in the SAT group (both P = 0.002). These data demonstrate that a short-term POLY KD induces a greater level of ketosis and improves SI, withou Continue reading >>

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  1. bookstorecowboy

    I have read a lot of posts and web sites about ketosis and about "weight loss," and I've read some books, as well. Based on what I've read, it seems that it would be impossible to "burn fat" (in the sense of burning body fat) without entering ketosis. If I have this right, the body burns energy supplies in these stages:
    1) alcohol (e.g. most of what is in beer)
    2) blood sugars (e.g. table sugar, most of the stuff grains break down into, fruit sugars, etc.)
    3) glycogen (stored in muscles)
    4) fat (fats that are eaten come first, followed by body fat)
    5) protein (comes last, after depletion of all other easily available stores of energy)
    It would seem logical, if this is right, that as long as your body has stores of alcohol, blood sugars, and glycogen, no body fat will be burned.
    So, to go on, if I have this right, then regardless of the kind of diet you are on, the only way to lose "weight" (in the sense of losing fat, which is the only kind of weight loss 99% of us are interested in) is to enter ketosis.
    Finally, if this is right, then any diet that promises "weight loss" (be it Ornish, the Paleo Diet, Atkins, or whatever) is promising that you will enter ketosis. If not, you will not actually "lose weight" in any sense you could desire. And it follows from this that any diet that works to any degree has no business warning people off ketosis, since it is going to occur.
    It also follows from this, in general although perhaps not in every situation, that the fewer carbs you eat, the more body fat you will burn (as long as you are in a calorie deficit).
    Is this right or wrong? Or right in some ways, but wrong in others?
    Thank you, list members...
    By the way, I bring this up in part because I have read quite a few critiques of Atkins, Paleo, and all "low carb diets," and every single one of them seems to screech about the supposed dangers of ketosis. I remember reading this back in the 1980s: "the one thing you don't want to do is enter ketosis, because then your body will be in starvation mode and will start hoarding ever single calorie," blah, blah, blah.

  2. ciep

    I don't know that I can provide a clear and/or complete answer to that question -- so I'll leave it to others. I would like to point out though that your body usually burns a mixture of fuels. So when both glucose and circulating fats are available (as they usually are) your body doesn't use the glucose exclusively (only moving on to the fats when no further glucose is available). Instead, it uses both simultaneously.
    I hope that helps. Basically, I guess I'm trying to say that you are always "burning fat". The key to weightloss is getting your body into a state where you're burning more of it than you're storing (on average). Reducing carbohydrates tends to help many people achieve this (and certainly an excess of carbs can make it difficult or even impossible), but I don't think ketosis necessarily required (depending on one's metabolism). In the past, I've successfully "cut up" with carbs in the 350g/day range.

  3. PokeyBug

    My ex-husband certainly lost fat without being in ketosis. He lost about 30 pounds on a low fat diet and exercise just before we met. He was miserable and hungry the entire time, but he thought CW was the only way to go. I somehow doubt he was in ketosis eating pasta every other night.

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Nutrition expert, James Dinicolantonio, PharmD author of the Salt Fix discusses how low-salt diets can cause overtraining, fatigue and a host of health problems. Check out this new bookThe Salt Fix: http://amzn.to/2uk3chD Register for our July MasterClass: http://bit.ly/2sMlzau Episode is Sponsored by: XYMOGEN's TestoPlex Plus: http://bit.ly/testoplex *new testosterone boosting formula Seeking Health's Optimal Electrolytes: http://amzn.to/2uaDWK4 -----------------------------------------Lets Connect-------------------------------------- Instagram https://www.instagram.com/metabolic_mike Facebook https://www.facebook.com/MikeMutzelMS Listen iTunes: http://highintensityhealth.com/itunes --------------------------------------Key Takeaways---------------------------------- 01:57 Dr. DiNicolantonios Salt Journey: He had always been into fitness and knew that his fitness suffered if he didnt have salt. Salt restrictive dietary guidelines made no sense and spurred his research into salt. He has published over 200 papers. 02:53 Losing Salt: We forgot that it is an essential nutrient. 03:57 Table Salt: Minerals like iodine, magnesium, calcium and others is missing from table salt. Celtic

Ketogenic Diets And Physical Performance

Abstract Impaired physical performance is a common but not obligate result of a low carbohydrate diet. Lessons from traditional Inuit culture indicate that time for adaptation, optimized sodium and potassium nutriture, and constraint of protein to 15–25 % of daily energy expenditure allow unimpaired endurance performance despite nutritional ketosis. Introduction In the opinion of most physicians and nutrition scientists, carbohydrate must constitute a major component of one's daily energy intake if optimum physical performance is to be maintained [1]. This consensus view is based upon a long list of published studies performed over the last century that links muscle glycogen stores to high intensity exercise. It has also been reinforced by the clinical experience of many physicians, whose patients following low carbohydrate formula or food diets frequently complain of lightheadedness, weakness, and ease of fatigue. During the time that this consensus view of the necessity of carbohydrate for vigorous exercise was forming, the last pure hunting cultures among the peoples of North America finally lost out in competition with expanding European cultural influences. Between 1850 and Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. bookstorecowboy

    I have read a lot of posts and web sites about ketosis and about "weight loss," and I've read some books, as well. Based on what I've read, it seems that it would be impossible to "burn fat" (in the sense of burning body fat) without entering ketosis. If I have this right, the body burns energy supplies in these stages:
    1) alcohol (e.g. most of what is in beer)
    2) blood sugars (e.g. table sugar, most of the stuff grains break down into, fruit sugars, etc.)
    3) glycogen (stored in muscles)
    4) fat (fats that are eaten come first, followed by body fat)
    5) protein (comes last, after depletion of all other easily available stores of energy)
    It would seem logical, if this is right, that as long as your body has stores of alcohol, blood sugars, and glycogen, no body fat will be burned.
    So, to go on, if I have this right, then regardless of the kind of diet you are on, the only way to lose "weight" (in the sense of losing fat, which is the only kind of weight loss 99% of us are interested in) is to enter ketosis.
    Finally, if this is right, then any diet that promises "weight loss" (be it Ornish, the Paleo Diet, Atkins, or whatever) is promising that you will enter ketosis. If not, you will not actually "lose weight" in any sense you could desire. And it follows from this that any diet that works to any degree has no business warning people off ketosis, since it is going to occur.
    It also follows from this, in general although perhaps not in every situation, that the fewer carbs you eat, the more body fat you will burn (as long as you are in a calorie deficit).
    Is this right or wrong? Or right in some ways, but wrong in others?
    Thank you, list members...
    By the way, I bring this up in part because I have read quite a few critiques of Atkins, Paleo, and all "low carb diets," and every single one of them seems to screech about the supposed dangers of ketosis. I remember reading this back in the 1980s: "the one thing you don't want to do is enter ketosis, because then your body will be in starvation mode and will start hoarding ever single calorie," blah, blah, blah.

  2. ciep

    I don't know that I can provide a clear and/or complete answer to that question -- so I'll leave it to others. I would like to point out though that your body usually burns a mixture of fuels. So when both glucose and circulating fats are available (as they usually are) your body doesn't use the glucose exclusively (only moving on to the fats when no further glucose is available). Instead, it uses both simultaneously.
    I hope that helps. Basically, I guess I'm trying to say that you are always "burning fat". The key to weightloss is getting your body into a state where you're burning more of it than you're storing (on average). Reducing carbohydrates tends to help many people achieve this (and certainly an excess of carbs can make it difficult or even impossible), but I don't think ketosis necessarily required (depending on one's metabolism). In the past, I've successfully "cut up" with carbs in the 350g/day range.

  3. PokeyBug

    My ex-husband certainly lost fat without being in ketosis. He lost about 30 pounds on a low fat diet and exercise just before we met. He was miserable and hungry the entire time, but he thought CW was the only way to go. I somehow doubt he was in ketosis eating pasta every other night.

  4. -> Continue reading
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If you are over age 50, you have a distinct advantage when applying for Social Security disability. At least for the time being, Social Security recognizes that claimants who are age 50 or older are likely to find it more difficult to secure employment, and are less likely to bounce back from a serious illness or injury. In this video I explain why age 50 is a magic age for SSDI and SSI and how you can benefit from Social Securitys policy. =============== FREE SURVIVAL KIT ================ Don't know where to begin? Download my free Secrets of Getting Approved Survival Kit at http://bit.ly/SSD-Survival-Kit ================================================ ============== FREE CASE EVALUATION ============= If you or a loved one would like a case evaluation for your SSDI or SSI case, please contact me at http://bit.ly/Contact-Jonathan ================================================ =================== CONTACT ME ================= Jonathan Ginsberg Social Security Disability Attorney Website: http://www.ssdAnswers.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GinsbergLaw/ Telephone: 800-890-2262 http://bit.ly/Contact-Jonathan ================================================ ***Click Below to

Ketogenic Low-carbohydrate Diets Have No Metabolic Advantage Over Nonketogenic Low-carbohydrate Diets – Research Review

Title and Abstract Johnston CS et. al. Ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets have no metabolic advantage over nonketogenic low-carbohydrate diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (2006) 83: 1055-1061 Background:Low-carbohydrate diets may promote greater weight loss than does the conventional low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. Objective:We compared weight loss and biomarker change in adults adhering to a ketogenic low-carbohydrate (KLC) diet or a nonketogenic low-carbohydrate (NLC) diet. Design:Twenty adults [body mass index (in kg/m2): 34.4 ± 1.0] were randomly assigned to the KLC (60% of energy as fat, beginning with 5% of energy as carbohydrate) or NLC (30% of energy as fat; 40% of energy as carbohydrate) diet. During the 6-wk trial, participants were sedentary, and 24-h intakes were strictly controlled. Results:Mean (±SE) weight losses (6.3 ± 0.6 and 7.2 ± 0.8 kg in KLC and NLC dieters, respectively; P = 0.324) and fat losses (3.4 and 5.5 kg in KLC and NLC dieters, respectively; P = 0.111) did not differ significantly by group after 6 wk. Blood ß-hydroxybutyrate in the KLC dieters was 3.6 times that in the NLC dieters at week 2 (P = 0.018), and LDL cholesterol was directly Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. bookstorecowboy

    I have read a lot of posts and web sites about ketosis and about "weight loss," and I've read some books, as well. Based on what I've read, it seems that it would be impossible to "burn fat" (in the sense of burning body fat) without entering ketosis. If I have this right, the body burns energy supplies in these stages:
    1) alcohol (e.g. most of what is in beer)
    2) blood sugars (e.g. table sugar, most of the stuff grains break down into, fruit sugars, etc.)
    3) glycogen (stored in muscles)
    4) fat (fats that are eaten come first, followed by body fat)
    5) protein (comes last, after depletion of all other easily available stores of energy)
    It would seem logical, if this is right, that as long as your body has stores of alcohol, blood sugars, and glycogen, no body fat will be burned.
    So, to go on, if I have this right, then regardless of the kind of diet you are on, the only way to lose "weight" (in the sense of losing fat, which is the only kind of weight loss 99% of us are interested in) is to enter ketosis.
    Finally, if this is right, then any diet that promises "weight loss" (be it Ornish, the Paleo Diet, Atkins, or whatever) is promising that you will enter ketosis. If not, you will not actually "lose weight" in any sense you could desire. And it follows from this that any diet that works to any degree has no business warning people off ketosis, since it is going to occur.
    It also follows from this, in general although perhaps not in every situation, that the fewer carbs you eat, the more body fat you will burn (as long as you are in a calorie deficit).
    Is this right or wrong? Or right in some ways, but wrong in others?
    Thank you, list members...
    By the way, I bring this up in part because I have read quite a few critiques of Atkins, Paleo, and all "low carb diets," and every single one of them seems to screech about the supposed dangers of ketosis. I remember reading this back in the 1980s: "the one thing you don't want to do is enter ketosis, because then your body will be in starvation mode and will start hoarding ever single calorie," blah, blah, blah.

  2. ciep

    I don't know that I can provide a clear and/or complete answer to that question -- so I'll leave it to others. I would like to point out though that your body usually burns a mixture of fuels. So when both glucose and circulating fats are available (as they usually are) your body doesn't use the glucose exclusively (only moving on to the fats when no further glucose is available). Instead, it uses both simultaneously.
    I hope that helps. Basically, I guess I'm trying to say that you are always "burning fat". The key to weightloss is getting your body into a state where you're burning more of it than you're storing (on average). Reducing carbohydrates tends to help many people achieve this (and certainly an excess of carbs can make it difficult or even impossible), but I don't think ketosis necessarily required (depending on one's metabolism). In the past, I've successfully "cut up" with carbs in the 350g/day range.

  3. PokeyBug

    My ex-husband certainly lost fat without being in ketosis. He lost about 30 pounds on a low fat diet and exercise just before we met. He was miserable and hungry the entire time, but he thought CW was the only way to go. I somehow doubt he was in ketosis eating pasta every other night.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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