diabetestalk.net

Fat Breakdown To Glucose

Share on facebook

Moof's Medical Biochemistry Video Course: http://moof-university.thinkific.com/...

Fatty Acid Metabolism

Fatty acid metabolism consists of catabolic processes that generate energy, and anabolic processes that create biologically important molecules (triglycerides, phospholipids, second messengers, local hormones and ketone bodies).[1] Fatty acids are a family of molecules classified within the lipid macronutrient class. One role of fatty acids in animal metabolism is energy production, captured in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). When compared to other macronutrient classes (carbohydrates and protein), fatty acids yield the most ATP on an energy per gram basis, when they are completely oxidized to CO2 and water by beta oxidation and the citric acid cycle.[2] Fatty acids (mainly in the form of triglycerides) are therefore the foremost storage form of fuel in most animals, and to a lesser extent in plants. In addition, fatty acids are important components of the phospholipids that form the phospholipid bilayers out of which all the membranes of the cell are constructed (the cell wall, and the membranes that enclose all the organelles within the cells, such as the nucleus, the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and the Golgi apparatus). Fatty acids can also be cleaved, or part Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. irishred

    I have a question for our science geeks. I have been fasting for 54 hours. I test my bg and it came back 134. My fasting bg has been running less than 100. I remember hearing Dr Fung answer a question once about an unexpected spike in glucose and if I remember correctly his answer was basically yeah it is just fat cells releasing their content. I was wondering if there is any science supporting this explanation or if there is something else going on. I have been working really hard to get my bg down to this level and sure hope I don’t have to spend weeks burning it down again. Thanks for all your geekiness!

  2. OldDoug

    I’ve had the same thing, IrishRed. While I don’t have any sure opinion on all the causes, I’m not worried about it. I see it as a sometime side-effect of a process that is enormously beneficial in other ways (and usually, in the end, very beneficial for blood sugar control as well). One reading of 134 - I’d say keep going and keep tracking it. No imminent emergency. My opinion.

    It’s fairly complicated, at least at times, how the body regulates blood sugar. Insulin has a lot of name recognition, and there are also Glucagon, Amylin, and the Incretins. As I understand Glucagon, it tells the liver and other tissue like muscle to use stored energy and make glucose (I’m seeing the effects of Glucagon as opposite the other three) - normally in response to declining blood sugar, as one would normally think of occurring during a fast. So, I’m thinking that if one has a little too much Glucagon, that could result in a raised blood glucose number.

  3. irishred

    Thanks Doug. I was not particularly worried as I know this woe will work slowly but surely. I just find the seemingly random bg spike in the middle of an extended fast odd. It did drop back down into the 90s a few hours later. The body is a wonderfully complicated thing.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

How and why do we get fat in the first place? How metabolism affects your fat loss? How to reverse slow metabolism? What is the most efficient weight loss plan for long term? We are going to answer these questions scientifically in this video. If you are confused and frustrated as well because no fat loss tip works for you, Or even if it does, it is very short term, stick around. It is time to put everything in place. In these series of videos, we will dig out the truth about how to finally lose weight for good. This particular video will be about how and why we get fat in the first place. We try to understand an intricate fat storing mechanism of your body. By doing that we can figure out what really causes you to get fat in the first place. So that you can avoid a lot of fad information on the internet. So, how is the food you eat changed into fat? What are the mechanisms that control that? When you eat food, it goes through a complex procedure in your digestive system. Food and drink must be changed into smaller molecules of nutrients before the blood absorbs them and carries them to cells throughout the body. The body breaks down nutrients from food and drink into carbohydrates, protein, fats, and vitamins. Carbohydrates are easiest source of energy. But they are hard to save for a long time. Human liver can hold approx 80-100g of carbohydrates and the muscles can only hold 1-2% of carbohydrates by the volume, known as glycogen. Rest of carbohydrates is turned into fat for storage. Fat on the other hand is easier to store. It is broken down into fatty acids. Part of it is used the rest is stored. Proteins are broken down into amino acids. From here, some of the amino acids build the body's protein stores. Excess amino acids are stored as a body fat. How does metabolism work? I will try to explain it without getting too technical. Basically, after nutrients from food are absorbed into your blood stream, your body produces hormone, called insulin, to tell the cells in your body to absorb the nutrients they needed and store the rest in fat cells. An important fact here is starchy carbohydrates and refined sugar are the nutrients that cause your body produce the most amount of insulin, which is called insulin spikes. If you have too many insulin spikes, over a period of time your cells start to build insulin resistance. As a result, your metabolism starts to slow down and you start to get fat. Categorizing people according to their fat loss goals Category 1 group is a group of people who just want to lose fat for the sake of looking slimmer. They are not interested in having an athletic physique. This type of people should start with tweaking their nutrition and lifestyle a little bit and eventually following one of the many diets that fit them. Category 2 group includes people who want to lose fat and look athletic at the same time. People in this category should start training as well as following some kind of diet regulations that fit their lifestyle and purpose. Category 3 group includes athletes and competitive bodybuilders who need to get down to exact amount of body fat percentage till a set deadline. Their diet is meticulously planned (counting calories) for losing fat without affecting athletic performance and physique. Conclusions: Now lets conclude what we have learnt so far. First of all, there is more than just counting calories for an efficient long-term fat loss plan. Reversing your metabolism in a healthy and enjoyable way might be much easier. Secondly, you dont have to be that meticulous to lose fat from the beginning. In fact, slow, step by step approach is going to give you better long-term results. Follow me on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alpomys/ Check out the BATHROOM SCALES here: http://amzn.to/2iyTel6 Check out ShredSmart by Radu Antoniu: http://thinkeatlift.teachable.com/p/s...

The Science Behind Fat Metabolism

Per the usual disclaimer, always consult with your doctor before experimenting with your diet (seriously, go see a doctor, get data from blood tests, etc.). Please feel free to comment below if you’re aware of anything that should be updated; I’d appreciate knowing and I’ll update the content quickly. My goal here is to help a scientifically curious audience know the basic story and where to dive in for further study. If I’m successful, the pros will say “duh”, and everyone else will be better informed about how this all works. [UPDATE: based on a ton a helpful feedback and questions on the content below, I’ve written up a separate article summarizing the science behind ketogenic (low-carb) diets. Check it out. Also, the below content has been updated and is still very much applicable to fat metabolism on various kinds of diets. Thanks, everyone!] tl;dr The concentration of glucose in your blood is the critical upstream switch that places your body into a “fat-storing” or “fat-burning” state. The metabolic efficiency of either state — and the time it takes to get into one from the other — depends on a large variety of factors such as food and drink volume Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. irishred

    I have a question for our science geeks. I have been fasting for 54 hours. I test my bg and it came back 134. My fasting bg has been running less than 100. I remember hearing Dr Fung answer a question once about an unexpected spike in glucose and if I remember correctly his answer was basically yeah it is just fat cells releasing their content. I was wondering if there is any science supporting this explanation or if there is something else going on. I have been working really hard to get my bg down to this level and sure hope I don’t have to spend weeks burning it down again. Thanks for all your geekiness!

  2. OldDoug

    I’ve had the same thing, IrishRed. While I don’t have any sure opinion on all the causes, I’m not worried about it. I see it as a sometime side-effect of a process that is enormously beneficial in other ways (and usually, in the end, very beneficial for blood sugar control as well). One reading of 134 - I’d say keep going and keep tracking it. No imminent emergency. My opinion.

    It’s fairly complicated, at least at times, how the body regulates blood sugar. Insulin has a lot of name recognition, and there are also Glucagon, Amylin, and the Incretins. As I understand Glucagon, it tells the liver and other tissue like muscle to use stored energy and make glucose (I’m seeing the effects of Glucagon as opposite the other three) - normally in response to declining blood sugar, as one would normally think of occurring during a fast. So, I’m thinking that if one has a little too much Glucagon, that could result in a raised blood glucose number.

  3. irishred

    Thanks Doug. I was not particularly worried as I know this woe will work slowly but surely. I just find the seemingly random bg spike in the middle of an extended fast odd. It did drop back down into the 90s a few hours later. The body is a wonderfully complicated thing.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In this video I provide some of my current (June 2017) thoughts about physiologic insulin resistance induced by prolonged carbohydrate restriction. Blog: http://cristivlad.com

Physiologic Effects Of Insulin

Stand on a streetcorner and ask people if they know what insulin is, and many will reply, "Doesn't it have something to do with blood sugar?" Indeed, that is correct, but such a response is a bit like saying "Mozart? Wasn't he some kind of a musician?" Insulin is a key player in the control of intermediary metabolism, and the big picture is that it organizes the use of fuels for either storage or oxidation. Through these activities, insulin has profound effects on both carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and significant influences on protein and mineral metabolism. Consequently, derangements in insulin signalling have widespread and devastating effects on many organs and tissues. The Insulin Receptor and Mechanism of Action Like the receptors for other protein hormones, the receptor for insulin is embedded in the plasma membrane. The insulin receptor is composed of two alpha subunits and two beta subunits linked by disulfide bonds. The alpha chains are entirely extracellular and house insulin binding domains, while the linked beta chains penetrate through the plasma membrane. The insulin receptor is a tyrosine kinase. In other words, it functions as an enzyme that transfers phosphat Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. irishred

    I have a question for our science geeks. I have been fasting for 54 hours. I test my bg and it came back 134. My fasting bg has been running less than 100. I remember hearing Dr Fung answer a question once about an unexpected spike in glucose and if I remember correctly his answer was basically yeah it is just fat cells releasing their content. I was wondering if there is any science supporting this explanation or if there is something else going on. I have been working really hard to get my bg down to this level and sure hope I don’t have to spend weeks burning it down again. Thanks for all your geekiness!

  2. OldDoug

    I’ve had the same thing, IrishRed. While I don’t have any sure opinion on all the causes, I’m not worried about it. I see it as a sometime side-effect of a process that is enormously beneficial in other ways (and usually, in the end, very beneficial for blood sugar control as well). One reading of 134 - I’d say keep going and keep tracking it. No imminent emergency. My opinion.

    It’s fairly complicated, at least at times, how the body regulates blood sugar. Insulin has a lot of name recognition, and there are also Glucagon, Amylin, and the Incretins. As I understand Glucagon, it tells the liver and other tissue like muscle to use stored energy and make glucose (I’m seeing the effects of Glucagon as opposite the other three) - normally in response to declining blood sugar, as one would normally think of occurring during a fast. So, I’m thinking that if one has a little too much Glucagon, that could result in a raised blood glucose number.

  3. irishred

    Thanks Doug. I was not particularly worried as I know this woe will work slowly but surely. I just find the seemingly random bg spike in the middle of an extended fast odd. It did drop back down into the 90s a few hours later. The body is a wonderfully complicated thing.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • The Liver, Muscle, And Fat Tissue Are All Prone To Insulin Resistance Due To Fat Build-up

    Over the past year I have interacted with hundreds of people with diabetes, and have come to learn one very important lesson that has changed my view of diabetes altogether. This realization came to me early on in my career as a nutrition and fitness coach for people with diabetes, and continues to hold true. While insulin resistance is a condition that is most commonly associated with type 2 diabetes, an increasing body of evidence is now sheddi ...

    insulin Jan 6, 2018
  • Fat Breakdown To Glucose

    Abstract Insulin is required for carbohydrate, fat, and protein to be metabolized. With respect to carbohydrate from a clinical standpoint, the major determinate of the glycemic response is the total amount of carbohydrate ingested rather than the source of the carbohydrate. This fact is the basic principle of carbohydrate counting for meal planning. Fat has little, if any, effect on blood glucose levels, although a high fat intake does appear to ...

    ketosis May 3, 2018
  • Breakdown Of Starch Into Glucose

    Amylase - Exploring digestion and evolution through a molecular machine Author(s): Becky Fulop, Juliet Girard, Thomas Noriega High School (9-12), Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12 Enzymes, macromolecules, digestion, genetics, evolution Amylase in our saliva breaks starch down into sugar. Human populations have variable copy numbers of the amylase gene due to differences in the amount of starch in their diet. Before the lesson: Enzyme, digest ...

    insulin May 15, 2018
  • Breakdown Of Glucose Is Called

    Glucose is a carbohydrate, and is the most important simple sugar in human metabolism. Glucose is called a simple sugar or a monosaccharide because it is one of the smallest units which has the characteristics of this class of carbohydrates. Glucose is also sometimes called dextrose. Corn syrup is primarily glucose. Glucose is one of the primary molecules which serve as energy sources for plants and animals. It is found in the sap of plants, and ...

    blood sugar Apr 26, 2018
  • Aerobic Breakdown Of Glucose

    The complete aerobic oxidation of glucose is coupled to the synthesis of as many as 36 molecules of ATP: Glycolysis, the initial stage of glucose metabolism, takes place in the cytosol and does not involve molecular O. It produces a small amount of ATP and the three-carbon compound pyruvate. In aerobic cells, pyruvate formed in glycolysis is transported into the mitochondria, where it is oxidized by O to CO. Via chemiosmotic coupling, the oxidati ...

    diabetes May 4, 2018
  • What Hormone Promotes Breakdown Of Glycogen To Glucose By The Liver?

    Lecture Review Topic - METABOLISM Note: Lecture 25, Hormones, Included With Metabolism Metabolism Sum of all the chemical transformations in the internal (cell) environment Couples two basic processes:Catabolism & Anabolism Anabolism = Synthetic processes, Energy Requird (ATP) Catabolism = Degradation processes, Energy Release, ATP synthesis Metabolism INPUT=> Anabolism building up Catabolism breaking down OUTPUT=> NUTRIENTS SMALL=>LARGE LARGE=>S ...

    insulin Apr 29, 2018

More in ketosis