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Euglycemic Ketoacidosis Definition

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Euglycemic Ketoacidosis

The purpose of this ariticle is to highlight the importance of not relying exclusively on blood glucose measurements when assessing sick type I diabetics. Urinary ketones and venous bicarbonate are essential in making the diagnosis of relatively low blood glucose plus ketoacidosis, that we call euglycaemic ketoacidosis. Pak J Med Sci January - March 2008 Vol. 24 No. 1 161-162 1. Dr. Muhammad Shahzad Rauf, MBBS, MRCP, Core Medical Training Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, * Received for Publication: October 31, 2007 The condition is defined as diabetic ketoacidosis with a bicarbonate level of less than 10mEq/L and a glucose level of less than 16.7mmol/l or 300mg% along with ketonemia or ketonuria, Euglycemic ketoacidosis occurred in 30% of patients admitted to the hospital on account of diabetic ketoacidosis. 1 True euglycaemic ketoacidosis (initial blood glucose 10mmol/l (180mg%) or less) is rare, occurring in 0.81.1% of all episodes depending on the defining plasma bicarbonate concentration.2 Clinically Euglycaemic ketoacidosis is usually manifested by vomiting. In addition some patient can present with, abdominal pain dysuria, productive cough, thirst, nausea. The cause of preserved "e Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Chet

    I am genetically acidic. This causes me to get gout and/or kidney stones.
    When I tried the Atkins diet (many many years ago) I believe that I went into ketosis and suffered gout and kidney stones.
    I am concerned that the PB will cause the same thing (while losing weight) as ketosis makes one acidic and I already am.
    I hope that the addition of fruits & veggies will preclude this.
    I had a wellness M.D. suggest that I take lots of magnesium; drink the following once to twice a week (2 oz's natural apple cider vinegar, 2 oz's lemon juice, & 2 oz's natural apple cider) to make me alkaline; and to stay hydrated. Since doing this, I have not had kidney stones, but get gout/pseudo gout if I don't stay hydrated.
    Hydrated was defined as enough water to cause 2 liters of urine/day. Living in Hawaii this results in way more than 8 glasses of water per day.
    Any thoughts?

  2. Elliot

    I can't talk about gout but vegetables can promote kidney stones. The oxalate in spinach is probably responsible.
    A randomized trial of low-animal-protein or high-fiber diets for se... - PubMed - NCBI
    Randomized controlled trial of a low animal protein, high fiber die... - PubMed - NCBI

  3. Neckhammer

    You should be fine. Stay hydrated. Watch the oxylates. I dont think it has anything to do with your "acidity"....not on PB or in ketosis. Magnesium deficiency and other deficiencies along with dehydration though? Ya, probably big part of it.

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Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Potential Complication Of Treatment With Sodiumglucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibition

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Potential Complication of Treatment With SodiumGlucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibition We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Potential Complication of Treatment With SodiumGlucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibition Anne L. Peters, Elizabeth O. Buschur, [...], and Irl B. Hirsch Sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are the most recently approved antihyperglycemic medications. We sought to describe their association with euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (euDKA) in hopes that it will enhance recognition of this potentially life-threatening complication. Cases identified incidentally are described. We identified 13 episodes of SGLT-2 inhibitorassociated euDKA or ketosis in nine individuals, seven with type 1 diabetes and two with type 2 diabetes, from various pract Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Scouser

    I started the Atkins diet at the beginning of the year and I am making slow progress. During the induction phase I lost 6 lb in this first week and then nothing after that. The second week I stayed the same weight and at time appeared to gain a pound or two and lose a pound or two! The whole time this was happening I was using the urine analysis strips ( and still am) and it was showing during the whole time I was producing a moderate to large amount of ketones! It has been a month now and I feel like I should be making more headway in this. Over the past month I have lost an additional four pounds (but I don't really count it because I have been known to put it on again some time in the week and then just stay at that weight). I have not increased my carbs from the inital amount suggested in the induction phase. I am concerned that I am not able to lose. I work out everyday (either yoga or step) for about 40 minutes, although I do have a desk job. Has this happened to anyone else? If so, what can I do?
    Thanks

  2. AngelaR

    It's normal to slow down after the induction period is over. Your body is thinking baout what is going on and trying to adjust. You are also exercising whish is replacing fat with lean muscle, and muscle weighs more than fat.
    Have you taken measurements? Sometimes you don't lose pounds, but you lose inches.
    The big question is, How much water are you drinking?
    Also, what are you eating? Are you eating any of the things that would slow you down? Are you eating foods that have hidden carbs? If you start a journal in the Bootcamp/Journals section, and post this kind of info regularly, then it will be easier for people to take a look at your patterns and give you some guidance.

  3. Natrushka

    Scouce, welcome to the forum.
    The first thing that comes to mind is are you drinking enough water and are you eating enough food. You should be drinking at the very minimum 64 oz of water a day (water, water and more water - anything else you drink should be above and beyond this). Guidlines for calories are 10 - 12 times your body weight a day - eating too little will stress your body and force it to hold onto fat and water. Put the two together and slow or nonexistant fat loss is not surprizing.
    Starting up a Journal in the Bootcamp section might be a good idea - just to give us some idea of what you've been eating and drinking. Remember to include quality and quantity! You might also be interested in checking out www.fitday.com It's a free online site that lets you keep track of fat/protein/carbs etc. It is usually a very eye opening experience.
    Hope to hear more,
    Nat

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Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Potential Complication Of Treatment With Sodiumglucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibition

Objective Sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are the most recently approved antihyperglycemic medications. We sought to describe their association with euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (euDKA) in hopes that it will enhance recognition of this potentially life-threatening complication. Research Design and Methods Cases identified incidentally are described. Results We identified 13 episodes of SGLT-2 inhibitorassociated euDKA or ketosis in nine individuals, seven with type 1 diabetes and two with type 2 diabetes, from various practices across the U.S. The absence of significant hyperglycemia in these patients delayed recognition of the emergent nature of the problem by patients and providers. Conclusions SGLT-2 inhibitors seem to be associated with euglycemic DKA and ketosis, perhaps as a consequence of their noninsulin-dependent glucose clearance, hyperglucagonemia, and volume depletion. Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who experience nausea, vomiting, or malaise or develop a metabolic acidosis in the setting of SGLT-2 inhibitor therapy should be promptly evaluated for the presence of urine and/or serum ketones. SGLT-2 inhibitors should only be used with grea Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Renee McCrory

    Prolonged high blood sugar levels can cause swelling in the brain -- cerebral edema. Children are more susceptible, but adult cases have been documented, according to Elliot J. Crane, MD, Departments of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology, Stanford University Medical Center. Other complications include organ damage from low blood pressure, heart attack and kidney failure.

  2. Phyllis Stewart

    This happens to me frequently. 600 will not kill you. You can go the the ER, and they will push high volumes of IV fluids and give you IV insulin. Doesn’t take long. The sooner you go, the easier it will be on you. Twice in two weeks, my readings were more than 600. You note that 600 is the highest reading available on meters, which is silly. For three days each time, I bolused 25 units in my pump every four hours. The first time, it finally took. The second, I became symptomatic which involved dehydration, lots of urination, etc. I found out that there are certain very simple sugars that will drive my glucose up very rapidly and very high. Now, no more problems

  3. Ryan P. Long

    Coma and death. 600 mg/dL is nearing the threshold of diabetic coma. Anyone in that situation should seek emergency medical treatment at their nearest hospital.

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