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Euglycemic Ketoacidosis

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Diagnostic And Therapeutic Dilemma

Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis: a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma 1Department of Internal Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County, Martinsville, Virginia, USA, 2Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas, USA, 3Senior Research Associate, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, 4Department of Pharmacology, St Johns Medical College, Bangalore, India, Received 2017 Jul 18; Accepted 2017 Aug 4. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License . Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (EDKA) is a clinical triad comprising increased anion gap metabolic acidosis, ketonemia or ketonuria and normal blood glucose levels <200 mg/dL. This condition is a diagnostic challenge as euglycemia masquerades the underlying diabetic ketoacidosis. Thus, a high clinical suspicion is warranted, and other diagnosis ruled out. Here, we present two patients on regular insulin treatment who were admitted with a diagnosis of EDKA. The first patient had insulin pump failure and the second patient had urinary tract infection and nausea, thereby resulting in starvation. Both Continue reading >>

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  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

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Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Potential Complication Of Treatment With Sodiumglucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibition

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Potential Complication of Treatment With SodiumGlucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibition We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Potential Complication of Treatment With SodiumGlucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibition Anne L. Peters, Elizabeth O. Buschur, [...], and Irl B. Hirsch Sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are the most recently approved antihyperglycemic medications. We sought to describe their association with euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (euDKA) in hopes that it will enhance recognition of this potentially life-threatening complication. Cases identified incidentally are described. We identified 13 episodes of SGLT-2 inhibitorassociated euDKA or ketosis in nine individuals, seven with type 1 diabetes and two with type 2 diabetes, from various pract Continue reading >>

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  1. tsazani

    Ketogenic diet + cold water therapy =

    Fat burning machine? http://paleoleap.com/cold-water-therapy/

  2. jdm1217

    Originally Posted by tsazani
    Fat burning machine? http://paleoleap.com/cold-water-therapy/ As I recalled, a number of people were killed by this including at least one very famous person a few centuries ago.

  3. Ken S

    Depending on how much this may increase leptin sensitivity, and improve thyroid hormone function (which this article doesn't mention but I've read about elsewhere), well those things do matter. People have reported hair growth from this though, that does suggest some positive hormonal changes and possibly upregulating of metabolism through free T3.
    I'll leave the cold water therapy to you though, yikes One of the things that has come out of diabetes is that I can dial my weight to whatever I want, no cold showers required, not that I'd want to endure that. I did struggle with this for quite a while but the lessons I learned when I dropped down to skeleton man weren't wasted I think that the biggest thing by far that works for me is limiting food take with a particular emphasis on carb and protein restriction but not overdoing the fat as well, however it's often not as easy as that with some of us which does suggest hormonal issues apart from what can be managed by such a dietary strategy. Insulin and leptin are both huge here I'd say and leptin involves more than just appetite control.

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Prolonged Ketosis In A Patient With Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis Secondary To Dapagliflozin

Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2) are the newest class of oral agents to receive US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). SGLT2 inhibitors currently approved by the FDA include canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin as well as various combination drugs (Table 1). The enthusiasm this class of drugs has been greeted with stems from the benefits associated with SGLT2 inhibitors. They include decrease in A1c by 0.5% to 1%, reduction in insulin doses, modest weight loss, and improved systolic and diastolic blood pressure.1 In addition, the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial showed a reduction in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality with empagliflozin.2 Also, a post hoc analysis of a study on dapagliflozin in type 2 diabetics with moderate renal impairment showed improved albuminuria and delayed progression to severe renal failure.3 The popularity of SGLT2 inhibitors is understandable considering the paucity of oral diabetic drugs that promote both weight loss and reduction of insulin needs. Endocrinologists and internists alike have increasingly prescribed this class of drugs as to avoid initiation of insulin or escalatio Continue reading >>

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  1. slobey

    Ketone Test strips

    Hey all,
    Today I tested my urine for ketones. I have a "trace" of in my body (5 ml/dg). Small=15 , moderate= 40 and large= 80-160.
    I have only being doing keto diet for a week so im not sure what results im supposed to see yet. Does anyone know which amount above would technically put me in ketosis? Also, if my carb re-feed days are sundays, should I be testing my urine on a certain day, or how often should I be testing it?

  2. mw818

    trace means you're in ketosis which is where you wanna be. The deeper purple you go, the more water you should be drinking from what i recall. It usually takes me 24 hours after my carb-ups to begin ketosis again. Good luck!

  3. xosaraxo2010

    Originally Posted by mw818
    trace means you're in ketosis which is where you wanna be. The deeper purple you go, the more water you should be drinking from what i recall. It usually takes me 24 hours after my carb-ups to begin ketosis again. Good luck!

    See I was curious about this.. I have been under 15g's of carbs per day (usually under 10 even) and I'm at the faintest of traces.. but I drink almost 4 liters of water a day during the week (weekends I slack on the water as I'm not at work.. and out and about doing things)..
    Hmm.

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