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Effects Of Respiratory Acidosis

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Respiratory Acidosis.

Abstract Respiratory acidosis, or primary hypercapnia, is the acid-base disorder that results from an increase in arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs with acute (Type II) respiratory failure, which can result from any sudden respiratory parenchymal (eg, pulmonary edema), airways (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma), pleural, chest wall, neuromuscular (eg, spinal cord injury), or central nervous system event (eg, drug overdose). Chronic respiratory acidosis can result from numerous processes and is typified by a sustained increase in arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, resulting in renal adaptation, and a more marked increase in plasma bicarbonate. Mechanisms of respiratory acidosis include increased carbon dioxide production, alveolar hypoventilation, abnormal respiratory drive, abnormalities of the chest wall and respiratory muscles, and increased dead space. Although the symptoms, signs, and physiologic consequences of respiratory acidosis are numerous, the principal effects are on the central nervous and cardiovascular systems. Treatment for respiratory acidosis may include invasive or noninvasive ventilatory s Continue reading >>

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  1. LaTisha

    I've been browsing the site and I've read some posts stating that ketones will not effect my breastmilk. Is this true?? (I just need to make sure ) Is it safe to be in ketosis and still breastfeed?? I really really hope so!! My baby is 7 months and although we've cut down nursing since she's been eating solids, I am not ready to completely stop nursing. I was on atkins prior to my pregnancy, I completely gave it up and ended up gaining 66 lbs! (and I thought the 50 that I gained with my 1st 2 pregnancies was bad *lol*) Anyway, I've lost about 46 of those pounds and I am so ready to lose the rest! I miss the way I felt while on atkins but I didn't think I could do it since I was breastfeeding and I had read somewhere that its not known whether being in ketosis is harmful. I never got far enough into the plan to find out what my CCLL is so I do need to start from scratch. Not to mention I'm completely addicted to carbs! Anyway, does anyone have any articles I can read or some really helpful info? Thanks!

  2. Helen H

    Yep, really true. When I was breastfeeding and low carbing, I used to test my milk regularly, with no signs of ketones. I've also asked some of the most qualified breastfeeding experts in the country, and they all assured me that ketones can't pass into breastmilk.
    When you think about it, it doesn't make sense that people who follow a naturally low carb diet couldn't breastfeed without causing harm to their babies. Nature is extremely protective of babies and breastmilk and has designed the breasts to act as a filter for anything harmful.
    Also, bear in mind that breast milk is a high fat food (54% of cals from fat) and that exclusively breastfed babies are in ketosis until solids are introduced. Considering that breastfed babies have higher average IQs than bottle fed ones, it obviously isn't doing them any harm.
    The one study that seemed to indicate that babies didn't like the taste of breastmilk after vigorous exercise, and which has been extrapolated to include ketosis, was a very badly conducted one. They took a group of exclusively breastfed babies, had their mothers do exercise, and then express milk into a bottle so they could see how much the babies drank. Naturally half of them turned up their noses, they knew the good stuff didn't come in a bottle.
    In practise, no amount of vigorous exercise or sweat seems to put off a hungry baby.
    According to my nursing toddlers, my breastmilk, even when I'm in ketosis, tastes like "warm icecream".

  3. .muse.

    Ahh, Helen, it's a shame you don't have a journal, because I've got so many questions I'd like to bombard you with, since you seem to be a plethora of knowledge regarding ketosis & breastfeeding, and I am, as you can see, so close to my duedate and am going to be going back to Atkins, because I don't like how high-carb diets make me feel.
    Anyway, if you ever wanted to pop into my journal and give me some good advice or links for where you've gotten some of your information, or anything of the sort, I would greatly appreciate it.
    Thanks in advance
    -alden

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Hello guys In this video discuss about the basic concept of acidosis and alkalosis and Discuss the topic of respiratory acidosis The cause Sign symptom and treatment Please subscribe my channel for more video And comment which video you want discuss in next videos. Thanks

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is a medical emergency in which decreased ventilation (hypoventilation) increases the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and decreases the blood's pH (a condition generally called acidosis). Carbon dioxide is produced continuously as the body's cells respire, and this CO2 will accumulate rapidly if the lungs do not adequately expel it through alveolar ventilation. Alveolar hypoventilation thus leads to an increased PaCO2 (a condition called hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2 in turn decreases the HCO3−/PaCO2 ratio and decreases pH. Terminology[edit] Acidosis refers to disorders that lower cell/tissue pH to < 7.35. Acidemia refers to an arterial pH < 7.36.[1] Types of respiratory acidosis[edit] Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (over 6.3 kPa or 45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (pH <7.36). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal blood pH (7.35 to 7.45) or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate (HCO3− >30 mm Hg). Causes Continue reading >>

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  1. ryuten

    How long can I stay in Ketosis

    Hey guys, I've done Keto in the past where I'd refeed on Saturdays, then back to Low Carb on Sundays until Friday, then refeed again Saturday.
    At the time I was doing strongman and I wanted to keep my strength/muscle mass.
    Right now I am doing Muay Thai and BJJ. I work out like 2-3 hrs a day. I just want to lose as much weight as possible and as quickly possible. I am not too worried about losing "too much weight" in a week because I know my conditioning will improve as I get skinnier.
    So, I am wondering how long can I go before I have to refeed? I know the brain needs glucose to function, so I am worried about going on for too long. So far I've been in Ketosis state since Tuesday morning when I woke up.
    Thanks

  2. Carus

    The brain can do just fine on the glucose your body harvests from dietary protein, that's not what carb ups are for. Carbs ups are a reset switch for important metabolic hormones like leptin and T3. Some people do well for weeks on end in ketosis; I'm certainly not one of those people. Plus, the added physiological benefits of a weekly carb up are more than worth it.

  3. Cowmustard

    if my understanding is correct, the more bf your carrying the longer you can go before your body starts catabolizing lean mass for carbs. I think some people have done SKD(straight keto diet) for months on end without much lm loss as long as they watch their activity and such.
    now you being a combative athlete does change the figure(I do the MT/BJJ route as well). I seem to preserve lm better when taking my BCAA supps, plenty of sleep, and getting about 2 tbs coconut oil a day.

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What is ALKALOSIS? What does ALKALOSIS mean? ALKALOSIS meaning - ALKALOSIS pronunciation - ALKALOSIS definition - ALKALOSIS explanation - How to pronounce ALKALOSIS? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Alkalosis is the result of a process reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia). In contrast to acidemia (serum pH 7.35 or lower), alkalemia occurs when the serum pH is higher than normal (7.45 or higher). Alkalosis is usually divided into the categories of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic alkalosis or a combined respiratory/metabolic alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation, resulting in a loss of carbon dioxide. Compensatory mechanisms for this would include increased dissociation of the carbonic acid buffering intermediate into hydrogen ions, and the related excretion of bicarbonate, both of which lower blood pH. Hyperventilation-induced alkalosis can be seen in several deadly central nervous system diseases such as strokes or Rett syndrome. Metabolic alkalosis can be caused by repeated vomiting, resulting in a loss of hydrochloric acid within the stomach content. Severe dehydration, and the consumption of alkali are other causes. It can also be caused by administration of diuretics and endocrine disorders such as Cushing's syndrome. Compensatory mechanism for metabolic alkalosis involve slowed breathing by the lungs to increase serum carbon dioxide, a condition leaning toward respiratory acidosis. As respiratory acidosis often accompanies the compensation for metabolic alkalosis, and vice versa, a delicate balance is created between these two conditions. Metabolic alkalosis is usually accompanied by low blood potassium concentration, causing, e.g., muscular weakness, muscle pain, and muscle cramps (from disturbed function of the skeletal muscles), and muscle spasms (from disturbed function of smooth muscles). It may also cause low blood calcium concentration. As the blood pH increases, blood transport proteins, such as albumin, become more ionized into anions. This causes the free calcium present in blood to bind more strongly with albumin. If severe, it may cause tetany.

Effects Of Respiratory Acidosis And Alkalosis On The Distribution Of Cyanide Into The Rat Brain

The aim of this study was to determine whether respiratory acidosis favors the cerebral distribution of cyanide, and conversely, if respiratory alkalosis limits its distribution. The pharmacokinetics of a nontoxic dose of cyanide were first studied in a group of 7 rats in order to determine the distribution phase. The pharmacokinetics were found to best fit a 3-compartment model with very rapid distribution (whole blood T1/2 = 21.6 3.3 s). Then the effects of the modulation of arterial pH on the distribution of a nontoxic dose of intravenously administered cyanide into the brains of rats were studied by means of the determination of the permeability-area product (PA). The modulation of arterial blood pH was performed by variation of arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) in 3 groups of 8 anesthetized mechanically ventilated rats. The mean arterial pH measured 20 min after the start of mechanical ventilation in the acidotic, physiologic, and alkalotic groups were 7.07 0.03, 7.41 0.01, and 7.58 0.01, respectively. The mean PAs in the acidotic, physiologic, and alkalotic groups, determined 30 s after the intravenous administration of cyanide, were 0.015 0.002, 0.011 0.001, and 0.008 Continue reading >>

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  1. Bellyman

    I am just wondering if there are any signs of ketosis that one can watch for that a person can see without any sort of testing? Are there things that happen physically that give clues?
    I don’t have any means of testing anything. I have a simple bathroom scale. That’s pretty much my only tool.
    I’ve been eating what I think is a pretty strict keto diet for about 4 days shy of one month. I’ve had a day or two when I didn’t exactly feel the greatest but never anything resembling the flu. I’ve had a couple of small oopsies but quite small ones, not within the last week or so, and less than I would have fingers for counting on one hand. I’ve been pretty good. I haven’t done anything extraordinary exercise wise, just a little walking. I’ve lost 19 pounds and feel pretty good. Brain seems pretty clear. No real issues that I can point towards except maybe a few restless nights, but even that isn’t dramatic, and getting used to new bowel habits.
    One thing I have noticed several times in the last week, when I take a shower in the mornings, I kinda notice what I think might be my breath. It’s not quite the same acetone smell I’ve noticed after a hard workout (when I had my elliptical machine). But it’s still a peculiar smell. I’ve wondered if that might be a hint that I may be in ketosis.
    So that got me to wondering whether that or maybe some other subtle things might be little clues of being in ketosis.
    I hope I haven’t plowed right into the content of a previous thread. I didn’t see it if it’s here, though, I’ll be the first to admit, I haven’t read them all.
    Glad to hear what you think if you’d care to share!

    And thanks for being here to talk about something that so many people haven’t a clue about. To most, it’s total deer-in-the-headlights talking about keto.

  2. Just_Todd

    Bellyman:
    And thanks for being here to talk about something that so many people haven’t a clue about. To most, it’s total deer-in-the-headlights talking about keto.

    The people here are the salt of the earth. (See what I did there?) I’m curious to hear responses to your question.

  3. Daisy

    Unless you have a really broken metabolism and need super super low carbs you are in ketosis and have been for a while. It does take a bit longer to really start running on fat as routine - what people call being fat adapted.

    It drove me mad not knowing though and I had to get gadgets!

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