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Effects Of Metabolic Acidosis On Cardiovascular System

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

Should Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Be Treated In Older People With Chronic Kidney Disease?

Should Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Be Treated In Older People With Chronic Kidney Disease?

Should chronic metabolic acidosis be treated in older people with chronic kidney disease? Correspondence and offprint requests to: Miles D. Witham; E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Clinical Biochemistry, Department of Laboratory Medicine East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 31, Issue 11, 1 November 2016, Pages 17961802, Miles D. Witham, Edmund J. Lamb; Should chronic metabolic acidosis be treated in older people with chronic kidney disease?, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 31, Issue 11, 1 November 2016, Pages 17961802, Metabolic acidosis is common in advanced chronic kidney disease and has been associated with a range of physiological derangements of importance to the health of older people. These include associations with skeletal muscle weakness, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone and mineral disorders that may lead to fragility fractures. Although metabolic acidosis is associated with accelerated decline in kidney function, end-stage renal failure is a much less common outcome in older, frail patients than cardiovascular death. Correction of metabolic acidosis using bicarbonate therapy is commonly employed, but the existing evidence is insufficient to know whether such therapy is of net benefit to older people. Bicarbonate is bulky and awkward to take, may impose additional sodium load with effects on fluid retention and blood pressure, and may cause gastrointestinal side effects. Trial data to date suggest potential benefits of bicarbonate therapy on progression of renal disease and nutrition, but trials have not as yet been published examining the effect of bicarbonate therapy across a range of domains relevant to the health of older people. Fortunately Continue reading >>

Effects Of Respiratory Alkalosis And Acidosis On Myocardial Blood Flow And Metabolism In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease | Anesthesiology | Asa Publications

Effects Of Respiratory Alkalosis And Acidosis On Myocardial Blood Flow And Metabolism In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease | Anesthesiology | Asa Publications

Effects of Respiratory Alkalosis and Acidosis on Myocardial Blood Flow and Metabolism in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease (Weyland, Rieke) Associate Professor of Anesthesiology. (Stephan, Sonntag) Professor of Anesthesiology. Effects of Respiratory Alkalosis and Acidosis on Myocardial Blood Flow and Metabolism in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Anesthesiology 10 1998, Vol.89, 831-837. doi: Anesthesiology 10 1998, Vol.89, 831-837. doi: Stephan Kazmaier, Andreas Weyland, Wolfgang Buhre, Heidrun Stephan, Horst Rieke, Klaus Filoda, Hans Sonntag; Effects of Respiratory Alkalosis and Acidosis on Myocardial Blood Flow and Metabolism in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease . Anesthesiology 1998;89(4):831-837. 2018 American Society of Anesthesiologists Effects of Respiratory Alkalosis and Acidosis on Myocardial Blood Flow and Metabolism in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated, or cited in the literature. You can manage this and all other alerts in My Account ALTHOUGH unintended or deliberate variation of the arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) is common in anesthetic practice, little is known about the myocardial consequences of respiratory alkalosis and acidosis in humans. Previous experimental studies have shown inconsistent results with respect to the effects of PaCO2on myocardial blood flow (MBF), myocardial metabolism, and global hemodynamics. This may have been caused in part by differences in the experimental design of the investigations. [1-6] Although most studies have shown that hypercapnia augments MBF above metabolic demands, [3,7-9] the results with respect to the effects of hypocapnia vary. [3,4] Furthermore, it seems questionable to transfer conclusions from experiment Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Acid-base Disturbances On Cardiovascular And Pulmonary Function - Sciencedirect

The Effects Of Acid-base Disturbances On Cardiovascular And Pulmonary Function - Sciencedirect

The effects of acid-base disturbances on cardiovascular and pulmonary function Author links open overlay panel Jere H.Mitchell1 Disturbances in acid-base balance are commonly met problems in clinical medicine and decisions about their treatment are of great importance in patients with cardiopulmonary problems, in whom acid-base disturbances may be especially critical.Similarly, cardiopulmonary function may be significantly compromised even in patients with no intrinsic heart or lung disease, in the face of acid-base disturbances.It is essential, therefore, to understand the physiological consequences of these disturbances on the cardiovascular and pulmonary system. Of major importance is the effect of acid-base disturbances on the delivery of oxygen to the various tissue cells of the body.In order to understand all the pathophysiological mechanisms involved it is necessary to review the effects of acid-base changes on the heart, the peripheral vessels, the lungs, and the diffusion of oxygen between air, blood, and tissues. The requirement for oxygen by the various tissue cells of the body is met by the combined cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, which function as a unit termed the oxygen transport system of the body.The movement of oxygen from the ambient air to the tissue cells involves ventilation, pulmonary perfusion, diffusion, oxygen-carrying capacity of hemoglobin, cardiac output (including cardiac muscle performance), systemic distribution of flow, and finally the oxygen delivery capacity of hemoglobin.It is important to understand the effects of changes in pH on each of these steps in the chain. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management: Adverse Effects Of Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management: Adverse Effects Of Metabolic Acidosis

Recommendations for the treatment of acute metabolic acidosis Gunnerson, K. J., Saul, M., He, S. & Kellum, J. Lactate versus non-lactate metabolic acidosis: a retrospective outcome evaluation of critically ill patients. Crit. Care Med. 10, R22-R32 (2006). Eustace, J. A., Astor, B., Muntner, P M., Ikizler, T. A. & Coresh, J. Prevalence of acidosis and inflammation and their association with low serum albumin in chronic kidney disease. Kidney Int. 65, 1031-1040 (2004). Kraut, J. A. & Kurtz, I. Metabolic acidosis of CKD: diagnosis, clinical characteristics, and treatment. Am. J. Kidney Dis. 45, 978-993 (2005). Kalantar-Zadeh, K., Mehrotra, R., Fouque, D. & Kopple, J. D. Metabolic acidosis and malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome in chronic renal failure. Semin. Dial. 17, 455-465 (2004). Kraut, J. A. & Kurtz, I. Controversies in the treatment of acute metabolic acidosis. NephSAP 5, 1-9 (2006). Cohen, R. M., Feldman, G. M. & Fernandez, P C. The balance of acid base and charge in health and disease. Kidney Int. 52, 287-293 (1997). Rodriguez-Soriano, J. & Vallo, A. Renal tubular acidosis. Pediatr. Nephrol. 4, 268-275 (1990). Wagner, C. A., Devuyst, O., Bourgeois, S. & Mohebbi, N. Regulated acid-base transport in the collecting duct. Pflugers Arch. 458, 137-156 (2009). Boron, W. F. Acid base transport by the renal proximal tubule. J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 17, 2368-2382 (2006). Igarashi, T., Sekine, T. & Watanabe, H. Molecular basis of proximal renal tubular acidosis. J. Nephrol. 15, S135-S141 (2002). Sly, W. S., Sato, S. & Zhu, X. L. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase isozymes in disorders involving osteopetrosis and/or renal tubular acidosis. Clin. Biochem. 24, 311-318 (1991). Dinour, D. et al. A novel missense mutation in the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1/ SLC4A4) Continue reading >>

Early Administration Of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes From Post-cardiac Arrest Acidosis

Early Administration Of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes From Post-cardiac Arrest Acidosis

Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan 2School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 3School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 5Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 6Bioresource Collection and Research Center, Food Industry Research and Development Institute, Hsinchu, Taiwan 7Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 8Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Genetic Engineering, Graduate School, Kasetsart University, Bangkhen Campus, Bangkok, Thailand 9Division of Pediatric General Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan 10College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Received 14 September 2016; Accepted 14 November 2016 Copyright 2016 Yan-Ren Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2) were includ Continue reading >>

Effects Of Clinically Relevant Acute Hypercapnic And Metabolic Acidosis On The Cardiovascular System: An Experimental Porcine Study.

Effects Of Clinically Relevant Acute Hypercapnic And Metabolic Acidosis On The Cardiovascular System: An Experimental Porcine Study.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Crit Care. 2013 Dec 30;17(6):R303. doi: 10.1186/cc13173. Effects of clinically relevant acute hypercapnic and metabolic acidosis on the cardiovascular system: an experimental porcine study. Hypercapnic acidosis (HCA) that accompanies lung-protective ventilation may be considered permissive (a tolerable side effect), or it may be therapeutic by itself. Cardiovascular effects may contribute to, or limit, the potential therapeutic impact of HCA; therefore, a complex physiological study was performed in healthy pigs to evaluate the systemic and organ-specific circulatory effects of HCA, and to compare them with those of metabolic (eucapnic) acidosis (MAC). In anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and instrumented pigs, HCA was induced by increasing the inspired fraction of CO2 (n = 8) and MAC (n = 8) by the infusion of HCl, to reach an arterial plasma pH of 7.1. In the control group (n = 8), the normal plasma pH was maintained throughout the experiment. Hemodynamic parameters, including regional organ hemodynamics, blood gases, and electrocardiograms, were measured in vivo. Subsequently, isometric contractions and membrane potentials were recorded in vitro in the right ventricular trabeculae. HCA affected both the pulmonary (increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR)) and systemic (increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP), decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR)) circulations. Although the renal perfusion remained unaffected by any type of acidosis, HCA increased carotid, portal, and, hence, total liver blood flow. MAC influenced the pulmonary circulation only (increase in MPAP and PVR). Both MAC and HCA reduced the stroke volume, which was compensate Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

Acidosis And Contractility Of Heart Muscle.

Acidosis And Contractility Of Heart Muscle.

Acidosis and contractility of heart muscle. The contractility of heart muscle is sensitive to small and physiological changes of extracellular pH. The reduction of contractility associated with an acidosis is determined by the fall of pH in the intracellular fluid. The function of many organelles within the cardiac cell is affected by hydrogen ions. The tension generated by isolated myofibrils at a fixed calcium concentration is reduced at low pH. The dominant mechanism for the reduction of contractility in whole tissue is competitive inhibition of the slow calcium current by hydrogen ions. The reduction of the slow calcium current is similar when the same fall of developed tension is induced by acidosis or by a reduction of extracellular calcium concentration. Measurement of tissue pH with fast-responding extracellular electrodes show that, in myocardial ischaemia, tissue acidosis develops at the same time or only seconds before the onset of contractile failure. Much of the reduced contractility can be accounted for by the severity of the acidosis. Although a mild acidosis can delay or prevent damage to the myocardium from ischaemia or hypoxia, a severe acidosis is not beneficial and may even cause tissue necrosis. Continue reading >>

Physiological Effects Of Hyperchloraemia And Acidosis

Physiological Effects Of Hyperchloraemia And Acidosis

Physiological effects of hyperchloraemia and acidosis Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Volume 101, Issue 2, 1 August 2008, Pages 141150, J. M. Handy, N. Soni; Physiological effects of hyperchloraemia and acidosis, BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Volume 101, Issue 2, 1 August 2008, Pages 141150, The advent of balanced solutions for i.v. fluid resuscitation and replacement is imminent and will affect any specialty involved in fluid management. Part of the background to their introduction has focused on the non-physiological nature of normal saline solution and the developing science about the potential problems of hyperchloraemic acidosis. This review assesses the physiological significance of hyperchloraemic acidosis and of acidosis in general. It aims to differentiate the effects of the causes of acidosis from the physiological consequences of acidosis. It is intended to provide an assessment of the importance of hyperchloraemic acidosis and thereby the likely benefits of balanced solutions. Hyperchloraemic acidosis is increasingly recognized as a clinical entity, a new enemy within, that had gone otherwise unnoticed for decades. Although any associated morbidity may be subtle at present, there is a trend in current evidence to suggest that hyperchloraemic acidosis may have adverse consequences which may be circumvented by the use of balanced solutions. These consequences, both theoretical and clinical, may result from hyperchloraemia, acidosis, or both. There is some evidence of hyperchloraemia causing problems, but at present the clinical relevance is uncertain. The literature does appear to be unified in stating that acidosis results in adverse physiological effects bu Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis is a condition that occurs when the body produces excessive quantities of acid or when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. If unchecked, metabolic acidosis leads to acidemia, i.e., blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of hydrogen ions by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3−) in the kidney. Its causes are diverse, and its consequences can be serious, including coma and death. Together with respiratory acidosis, it is one of the two general causes of acidemia. Terminology : Acidosis refers to a process that causes a low pH in blood and tissues. Acidemia refers specifically to a low pH in the blood. In most cases, acidosis occurs first for reasons explained below. Free hydrogen ions then diffuse into the blood, lowering the pH. Arterial blood gas analysis detects acidemia (pH lower than 7.35). When acidemia is present, acidosis is presumed. Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms are not specific, and diagnosis can be difficult unless the patient presents with clear indications for arterial blood gas sampling. Symptoms may include chest pain, palpitations, headache, altered mental status such as severe anxiety due to hypoxia, decreased visual acuity, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, altered appetite and weight gain, muscle weakness, bone pain, and joint pain. Those in metabolic acidosis may exhibit deep, rapid breathing called Kussmaul respirations which is classically associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Rapid deep breaths increase the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled, thus lowering the serum carbon dioxide levels, resulting in some degree of compensation. Overcompensation via respiratory alkalosis to form an alkalemia does not occur. Extreme acidemia leads to neurological and cardia Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis And Cardiovascular Disease In Patients On Peritoneal Dialysis

Metabolic Acidosis And Cardiovascular Disease In Patients On Peritoneal Dialysis

Metabolic Acidosis and Cardiovascular Disease in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis Vaia D. Raikou1Anastasia Evaggelatou2Despina Kyriaki2 1Dpt of Medicine - Propaedaetic, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine. 2Dpt of Nuclear Medicine. General Hospital LAKO, S, GREECE Metabolic acidosis, a common condition particularly in end stage renal disease patients, results in malnutrition and inflammation. In this study, we focused on the importance of metabolic acidosis on manifestations of cardiovascular disease in patients on peritoneal dialysis. We studied 20 patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), 15 males and 5 females, on mean age 61.6 11.3 years old. Metabolic acidosis was determined by serum bicarbonate concentrations less than 22mmol/L, which were measured in gas machine. Dialysis adequacy was defined by total Kt/V/week for urea including peritoneal Kt/V for urea and residual GFR (ml/min/1.73m2). High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was measured using enzyme linked immunoabsorbed assay (LISA). The concentrations of intact-parathormone(i-PTH) and beta2-microglobulin (beta2M) were measured by radioimmunoassays. Arterial stiffness was measured as carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV) and augmentation index (AIx). We built a Cox regression analysis to predict coronary artery disease (CAD), congestive heart failure (CHF) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Serum bicarbonate levels were inversely associated to beta2M, i-PTH and AIx (r=-0.451, p=0.04, r=-0.477, p=0.03 and r=-0.569, p=0.009 respectively). Cox- regression analysis revealed significant association of serum bicarbonate levels and PVD having as confounders traditional and specific for these patients risk factors. Metabolic acidosis may be an independe Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Complications Of Ketoacidosis

Cardiovascular Complications Of Ketoacidosis

US Pharm. 2016;41(2):39-42. ABSTRACT: Ketoacidosis is a serious medical emergency requiring hospitalization. It is most commonly associated with diabetes and alcoholism, but each type is treated differently. Some treatments for ketoacidosis, such as insulin and potassium, are considered high-alert medications, and others could result in electrolyte imbalances. Several cardiovascular complications are associated with ketoacidosis as a result of electrolyte imbalances, including arrhythmias, ECG changes, ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac arrest, which can be prevented with appropriate initial treatment. Acute myocardial infarction can predispose patients with diabetes to ketoacidosis and worsen their cardiovascular outcomes. Cardiopulmonary complications such as pulmonary edema and respiratory failure have also been seen with ketoacidosis. Overall, the mortality rate of ketoacidosis is low with proper and urgent medical treatment. Hospital pharmacists can help ensure standardization and improve the safety of pharmacotherapy for ketoacidosis. In the outpatient setting, pharmacists can educate patients on prevention of ketoacidosis and when to seek medical attention. Metabolic acidosis occurs as a result of increased endogenous acid production, a decrease in bicarbonate, or a buildup of endogenous acids.1 Ketoacidosis is a metabolic disorder in which regulation of ketones is disrupted, leading to excess secretion, accumulation, and ultimately a decrease in the blood pH.2 Acidosis is defined by a serum pH <7.35, while a pH <6.8 is considered incompatible with life.1,3 Ketone formation occurs by breakdown of fatty acids. Insulin inhibits beta-oxidation of fatty acids; thus, low levels of insulin accelerate ketone formation, which can be seen in patients with diabetes. Extr Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis Of Chronic Kidney Disease And Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease Markers: Friend Or Foe?

Metabolic Acidosis Of Chronic Kidney Disease And Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease Markers: Friend Or Foe?

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. [1] Moreover, CVD often begins before end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and patients with reduced renal function are more likely to die of CVD than to develop ESRD. [2] There are 3 pathological forms of CVD that should be considered in patients with CKD: alterations in cardiac geometry, including left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, and arteriosclerosis. [2] The clinical interventions on traditional and nontraditional risk factors for CVD were not as effective as in the general population, mainly because of the unique CKD setting. [3,4] Therefore, identification of new risk factors may prove useful in the development of new targeted therapies. Chronic metabolic acidosis (MA) is a common complication of CKD and, furthermore, lower serum bicarbonate levels have been associated with CKD progression. Moreover, the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of CKD suggest that patients with serum bicarbonate concentrations under 22 mEq/L should be treated with oral bicarbonate supplementation in order to maintain serum bicarbonate within the normal range. Although, there is an increased risk of death with metabolic acidosis of CKD (MAC), the effect of MAC on CVD is a subject of debate. [5] Thus, in some studies MAC was associated with factors that could lead to CVD like hypertension and chronic inflammation, while in another study serum bicarbonate was not related to cardiac structural and functional abnormalities. [68] Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between MAC and markers of cardiovascular damage that address the 3 CVD pathological forms in nondialysis CKD pat Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. See also separate Lactic Acidosis and Arterial Blood Gases - Indications and Interpretations articles. Description Metabolic acidosis is defined as an arterial blood pH <7.35 with plasma bicarbonate <22 mmol/L. Respiratory compensation occurs normally immediately, unless there is respiratory pathology. Pure metabolic acidosis is a term used to describe when there is not another primary acid-base derangement - ie there is not a mixed acid-base disorder. Compensation may be partial (very early in time course, limited by other acid-base derangements, or the acidosis exceeds the maximum compensation possible) or full. The Winter formula can be helpful here - the formula allows calculation of the expected compensating pCO2: If the measured pCO2 is >expected pCO2 then additional respiratory acidosis may also be present. It is important to remember that metabolic acidosis is not a diagnosis; rather, it is a metabolic derangement that indicates underlying disease(s) as a cause. Determination of the underlying cause is the key to correcting the acidosis and administering appropriate therapy[1]. Epidemiology It is relatively common, particularly among acutely unwell/critical care patients. There are no reliable figures for its overall incidence or prevalence in the population at large. Causes of metabolic acidosis There are many causes. They can be classified according to their pathophysiological origin, as below. The table is not exhaustive but lists those that are most common or clinically important to detect. Increased acid Continue reading >>

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