diabetestalk.net

Drugs That Prevent Ketosis

Diet Stops Seizures When Epilepsy Drugs Fail

Diet Stops Seizures When Epilepsy Drugs Fail

When Jackson Small began having seizures at 7, his parents hoped and assumed at least one of the many epilepsy drugs on the market would be enough to get things under control. But one seizure quickly spiraled to as many as 30 a day. "He would stop in his tracks and not be aware of what was going on for 20 or 30 seconds or so," his mother Shana Small told CBS News. Jackson was eventually diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, a type of epilepsy characterized by brief but often frequent muscle jerking or twitching. But a number of medications typically prescribed to patients with this type of epilepsy were not effective. And so the quest to help Jackson gain control over his seizures led the family from their home in Orlando, Florida, to the office of a registered dietician at the NYU Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center in New York City. They were there to discuss the medical benefits of heavy cream, mayonnaise, eggs, sausage, bacon and butter. A lot of butter. The plan was to treat Jackson with a diet that is heavy in fat, low in protein and includes almost no carbohydrates. It's known as the ketogenic diet and has long been in the arsenal of last-resort options for patients with epilepsy who are unresponsive to medication. Doctors may recommend a patient go on this special diet after unsuccessfully trying two or three prescriptions. The diet works by putting the body in a "fasting" state, known as ketosis. "When we're fasting the body needs to find fuel so our body will break down fat storage and break down their own fat and enter a state of ketosis," Courtney Glick, the registered dietician who coordinated and fine-tuned Jackson's diet plan, told CBS News. "But with this diet, instead of breaking down the body's fat, the body breaks down dietary fat." The ketoge Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Migraines

Ketosis For Migraines

Migraines are no joke. Anyone who suffers from them knows just how debilitating the symptoms can be, including nausea or vomiting, severe pain, and sensitivity to light and noise. Migraines can prevent people from working or leaving their house and can decrease overall quality of life. Some with migraines have used the ketogenic diet as a method for improving their migraine headaches. We’ll talk about why and how ketosis can be beneficial for migraine sufferers. What are Migraines? Here are some facts about migraines: Migraines are reccuring moderate to severe headaches, often including intense throbbing, that usually last anywhere between four to 72 hours at a time. They usually start on one side of the sufferer’s head and can spread to include both sides. Some people experience an aura, like a pursing flash of light, and fatigue right before a migraine comes on. Triggers for migraines can include changes in hormones, eating or drinking certain things, exercise, or stress. Most medications for treating migraines are either for pain relief or to prevent or lessen the recurrence. However, each come with their possible side effects and aren’t guaranteed to be effective. Let’s take a look at how inducing ketosis in the body through a ketogenic diet might be able to help those with migraines: The Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy Vs Migraines The ketogenic diet was originally created to help prevent seizures in epilepsy patients who weren’t responding to medication. It allowed patients to mimic fasting (which has been found to reduce their amount of seizures) while still getting to eat—since the high fat and very-low-carb intake of ketogenic starves the body of glucose. Since since, the ketogenic diet been utilized for not only helping people lose weight but also in a Continue reading >>

Avoid Unnecessary Drug-related Carbohydrates For Patients Consuming The Ketogenic Diet.

Avoid Unnecessary Drug-related Carbohydrates For Patients Consuming The Ketogenic Diet.

Abstract The ketogenic diet is intended for use in patients with epilepsy whose seizures are resistant to conventional drug therapy. It is a diet high in fat and low in carbohydrate and protein content, and is intended to produce ketosis from the incomplete metabolism of fats. It is safe and effective--many patients with severe, drug-resistant epilepsy show improvement. Limiting carbohydrate intake in patients to obtain the necessary ratio of fats to carbohydrates and protein requires careful planning and, in children, parental involvement. Although the ketogenic diet is professionally planned, an unrecognized source of carbohydrates is prescription and over-the-counter medications. If the carbohydrate content of medications is overlooked, ketosis can be inhibited with potential loss of seizure control occurring. Thus, it is essential for care providers and parents to know the carbohydrate content of medications, including not only the typical sugar content, but also the content of reduced carbohydrate (e.g., glycerin). From information supplied by drug manufacturers, we determined the carbohydrate content of commonly used medications. By knowing the carbohydrate content of these often used medications, the additional carbohydrate content of the medications can be taken into account and adjustments can be made in the ketogenic diet. Continue reading >>

Ketosis-prone Type 2 Diabetes Medication

Ketosis-prone Type 2 Diabetes Medication

Medication Summary Insulin injected subcutaneously is the first-line treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. The different types of insulin vary with respect to onset and duration of action. Short-, intermediate-, and long-acting insulins are available. Short-acting and rapid-acting insulins are the only types that can be administered intravenously (IV). Human insulin currently is the only species of insulin available in the United States; it is less antigenic than the previously used animal-derived varieties. Pharmacologic therapy of type 2 diabetes has changed dramatically in the last 10 years, with new drugs and drug classes becoming available. These drugs allow for the use of combination oral therapy, often with improvement in glycemic control that was previously beyond the reach of medical therapy. Agents used in diabetic therapy include the following: Traditionally, diet modification has been the cornerstone of diabetes management. Weight loss is more likely to control glycemia in patients with recent onset of the disease than in patients who are significantly insulinopenic. Medications that induce weight loss, such as orlistat, may be effective in highly selected patients but are not generally indicated in the treatment of the average patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients who are symptomatic at initial presentation with diabetes may require transient treatment with insulin to reduce glucose toxicity (which may reduce beta-cell insulin secretion and worsen insulin resistance) or an insulin secretagogue to rapidly relieve symptoms such as polyuria and polydipsia. Continue reading >>

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Great article. You actually answered my question as to the ratio of the 3 BHB salts which is quite helpful for me. For me, I had Keto O/S and found it quite good – my favorite was the chocolate swirl. But it was and is very expensive. Only 15-20 servings and would break the bank. So I turned to KetoCaNa and I’ve tried two flavours. Both of them were so salty that I almost threw up every time. Like flavoured sea water. Also only 15 serving per bottle. Then I turned to Ketond which is okay – Tigers Blood and Caramel Macchiato. What I like about Ketond is that it has a full 30 servings and is very transparent with it’s ingredients. It’s also the same price as Keto OS but you get 30 servings. But still, not the best taste. So in the end, I ordered 1kg of pure BHB Magnesium from a supplier in China and I will be developing my own Ketone product with 30 servings as a lower price than all the competitors, and with more Magnesium, and Calcium in it than Sodium so that it tastes the best and actually helps with weight loss (which Magnesium is proven to do at the right amount). What the companies don’t tell you is that actually Sodium BHB is the cheapest, then Calcium BHB and then Magnesium BHB to source so I would be interested in knowing if what you wrote is actually true or just an excuse to make the product cheaper. Probably a mix of both. So I have 2 questions Ben: 1. If you had to split the 11.7g of BHB into Sodium, Ca, and Mg, what ratio would you do for the best health results and potential weight loss? The current products on the market are about an 80/12/8 split. I would think it should be the other way around. 2. When I develop my own product and sell it, would you be up for sampling it and reviewing it on your website here? What flavours do you like/would Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

What the Diet Does Normally, our bodies run on energy from glucose, which we get from food. We can’t store large amounts of glucose, however. We only have about a 24-hour supply. When a child has no food for 24 hours — which is the way the diet begins, usually in a hospital — he or she uses up all the stored glucose. With no more glucose to provide energy, the child’s body begins to burn stored fat. The ketogenic diet keeps this process going. It forces the child’s body to burn fat round the clock by keeping calories low and making fat products the primary food that the child is getting. In fact, the diet gets most (80 percent) of its calories from fat. The rest comes from carbohydrates and protein. Each meal has about four times as much fat as protein or carbohydrate. The amounts of food and liquid at each meal have to be carefully worked out and weighed for each person. Doctors don’t know precisely why a diet that mimics starvation by burning fat for energy should prevent seizures, although this is being studied. Nor do they know why the same diet works for some children and not for others. Trying to put a child on the diet without medical guidance puts a child at risk of serious consequences. Every step of the ketogenic diet process must be managed by an experienced treatment team, usually based at a specialized medical center. Chances of Success Often, a period of fine-tuning is needed before it’s clear whether or not a child is going to respond to the ketogenic diet. Doctors often ask parents to try the diet for at least one month, and even as long as two or three, if it’s not working at first. A child on the diet usually continues taking anti-seizure medicine, but may be able to take less of it later on. If a child does very well, the doctor may sl Continue reading >>

Feeling Euphoric On A Low-carb Diet? The Effect On Your Brain Is Similar To An Illicit Drug

Feeling Euphoric On A Low-carb Diet? The Effect On Your Brain Is Similar To An Illicit Drug

Feeling euphoric on a low-carb diet? The effect on your brain is similar to an illicit drug June 21, 2017 4.02pm EDT Some people on very low-carb diets say they feel euphoric, have clear minds and lose their appetite. Going low-carb might even mimic the effects of GHB – the recreational drug better known as fantasy, liquid ecstasy or grievous bodily harm – on the brain. To understand why we need to look at how the body processes a very low-carb diet, one that typically limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day. That’s one cup of rice, two slices of bread or roughly 10% of your total daily energy needs. Your body thinks it’s starving A very low-carb diet flips your metabolic switch from burning more carbs than fat, to more fat than carbs. This usually takes a few days in a process known as ketosis. During this time, your body thinks it’s starving. Once it uses up most of your glucose (carb) reserves, the body stimulates the breakdown of stored fat into fatty acids and releases them into the blood. When fatty acids reach the liver they’re converted into acetoacetate, an excellent metabolic fuel that belongs to a family of chemicals called ketones. That’s why very low-carb diets are sometimes called “ketogenic” diets. Acetoacetate decomposes to carbon dioxide and acetone, the smelly solvent best known for its ability to remove nail polish. This is why very low-carb dieters and people who are fasting often have sweet smelling breath. A healthy liver minimises the acetone lost via the lungs by converting most of the acetoacetate it produces to a more stable substance, called beta-hydroxybutyrate or BHB. And this is where those euphoric feelings could come from. BHB is almost identical to GHB, the naturally occurring neurotransmitter, called gamma- Continue reading >>

Can People With Epilepsy Benefit From The Ketogenic Diet?

Can People With Epilepsy Benefit From The Ketogenic Diet?

What is the ketogenic diet? Some might consider the ketogenic diet to be a fad diet, however, it was discovered centuries ago for the dietary management of refractory epilepsy. The ketogenic diet is a high fat, adequate protein and low carbohydrate diet. The diet was discovered by the observation of decreased seizure frequency during episodes of fasting. In 1921, Dr. Wilder at Mayo clinic suggested the ketogenic diet for the long-term management of epilepsy. In terms of this suggestion, it was stated that the benefits of fasting could be recreated through the implementation of a ketogenic diet. Additionally, the high fat low carb diets could be sustained for a much longer period as it compensates for the clear disadvantages associated with a prolonged period of fasting. The use of the diet was restricted to very young children and strictly impaired individuals as it was considered a last resort therapy, due to its severe dietary restrictions, unpalatability and limited access to ketogenic diet centers. Nevertheless, currently, the ketogenic diet is a well-established non-pharmacological treatment for childhood refractory epilepsy. The ketogenic diet in refractory epilepsy: Today, there are established ketogenic diet clinics worldwide with dietitians trained and experienced in administering it. The John Hopkins Hospital in Maryland (US) is an example of such a clinic, with a Child and Adult Epilepsy Diet Centre. But the question remains: when should someone be referred to such a clinic or dietitian, to initiate the ketogenic diet? It is recommended to implement the ketogenic diet after two trials of anti-seizure medication has failed to alleviate the frequency and/or the severity of seizures [1]. Initial anti-seizure drug (as standalone therapy) control seizures in appro Continue reading >>

Paleo And Keto On The Brain

Paleo And Keto On The Brain

The Paleo and the ketogenic diets have surged in popularity over the last 15 years. But are these diets safe, and can they improve our brain health? Followers of the Paleo diet believe our genes are not evolved to properly digest the foods that have become prevalent since the agricultural revolution, such as grains, sugars, legumes, dairy products, processed oils, salt, alcohol, and coffee. Instead we should eat the way our Paleolithic ancestors did, and fill our plates with fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, roots, and meat. No research has yet looked at whether the Paleo diet can prevent cognitive decline or dementia. One study reported the Paleo diet did not improve memory in overweight, post-menopausal women when compared to the national dietary recommendations in Nordic countries (recommendations which include more carbohydrates and less fat/protein than the Paleo diet). On the other hand, preliminary studies indicate that the Paleo diet might improve measures of metabolic health, including triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels, and blood pressure—potential risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. But the Paleo diet has not been studied in many people and its long-term effects are unclear. Although it promotes eating healthy foods, some food groups are cut out, and individuals at risk for osteoporosis should avoid the diet since it may lead to calcium and vitamin D deficiency. Another diet growing in popularity is the ketogenic diet. Initially developed in the 1920s as a potential therapy for children with difficult-to-treat epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is high in fats, very low in carbs, with moderate protein. Usually, carbohydrates are our brain’s primary energy source but ketone molecules generated from fats are also a potential source Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Ketogenic Diet On Cognition In Older Adults With Hiv

The Impact Of Ketogenic Diet On Cognition In Older Adults With Hiv

Poor cognitive function is a serious problem in the aging HIV-positive population, where it has been estimated that up to 59 percent of HIV-positive adults demonstrate at least mild cognitive impairment. University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Assistant Professor Shannon Morrison, Ph.D., is exploring multiple effects of a ketogenic diet—a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet with adequate protein—in medically stable, older persons living with HIV who have mild to moderate neurocognitive impairment. The study, following previous encouraging research, is supported by a one-year, $60,000 grant from the UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science. "In the studies that have been conducted so far, the ketogenic diet has shown some promising results in improving cognition in other neurocognitive disorders," Morrison said. "We're hoping to see if the same or similar results will occur to the older, cognitively impaired HIV population. I am just thrilled at this opportunity and am preparing to begin recruitment in early January." A person consumes fewer than 50 total grams of carbohydrates per day on a ketogenic diet. When the amount of carbohydrates, or sugars, the body has to process for fuel is limited, it will start to break down fat and, as a byproduct of that fat metabolism, produce the ketones for which the ketogenic diet is named. "What a ketogenic diet does is change the energy source the body uses for fuel for its activities," Morrison said. "If you are not taking in much sugar, your body will start breaking down fat for energy, and a byproduct of the fat metabolism is ketone bodies. The body, including the brain, is then able to efficiently utilize ketone bodies for energy." This randomized control trial, "The Effect of a Ketogenic Diet on HIV-Assoc Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

Will Vegetable Carbohydrates Stop Ketosis

Will Vegetable Carbohydrates Stop Ketosis

We were unable to load Disqus. If you are a moderator please see our troubleshooting guide. 7952 commentsComments Dr.BergCommunity Login Disqus Facebook Twitter Google 1 Recommend Recommended 2608 Discussion Recommended! Recommending means this is a discussion worth sharing. It gets shared to your followers' Disqus feeds, and gives the creator kudos! Find More Discussions Share Share this discussion on Twitter Facebook Sort by Newest Best Newest Oldest Join the discussion… in this conversation ⬇ Drag and drop your images here to upload them. Attach Log in with or sign up with Disqus or pick a name Disqus is a discussion network Disqus never moderates or censors. The rules on this community are its own. Don't be a jerk or do anything illegal. Everything is easier that way. Read full terms and conditions By signing up, you agree to the Disqus Basic Rules, Terms of Service, and Privacy Policy. By posting, you agree to the Disqus Basic Rules, Terms of Service, and Privacy Policy. ma • 6 hours ago Dr. Berg, this is probably about more than you think. Don't worry. Your actions will bring you what you deserve. I live in DC. I know you have been helping many people for many years. I suspect some of the truths that you say are threats to many industries, like the soy industry, and gmo products, etc. The food and drug industry do not want the truth about how they are causing illnesses, obesity etc and the Healthcare/insurance industry continues to exclude key tests that will prove millions of Americans have conditions like hypothyroidism which is caused by GMO foods. But, with your advice for natural healing you make big pharma uneccesary. The Oz team probably looked through your stuff and found something that would offend one of their partners. That is how the entertainmen Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Ketoacidosis And The Risk Of Some Diabetes Drugs | Dr. Jonathan Goodman, Nd

Ketosis Ketoacidosis And The Risk Of Some Diabetes Drugs | Dr. Jonathan Goodman, Nd

KETOSIS VS. KETOACIDOSIS: THEYRE NOT AT ALL THE SAME: Why a new class of diabetes drug got an FDA warning The FDA recently issued a warning of a risk of ketoacidosis from a new class of type 2 diabetes drugs. The drugs, called Farxiga, Invokana, and Jardiance are SGLT2 inhibitors. They make it easier for sugar to get through the kidneys so it can be removed in urine. These drugs are used to help lower blood sugar and support weight loss. Ill explain why these drugs are risky, especially if youre on a low-carb diet. Ketosis, or nutritional ketosis, or keto-adaptation, is a normal, healthy adaptation mechanism. Our brains can use either glucose or ketones as fuel. If we eat a restricted amount of carbohydrates, usually less than 50 grams per day, our fat is broken down to make ketones. This process is ongoing but controlled and is designed to keep our brains well-nourished. As soon as we add back carbohydrates, ketosis stops. The insulin in our bodies gets the sugar into our cells, signaling the body to stop making ketones. Many of my patients find they lose weight and fat faster when they are in ketosis. I have been in and out of ketosis and find I feel leaner in ketosis. If you are interested in spending more time in ketosis, contact the office. We will map out a safe path for you. Unlike ketosis, ketoacidosis reflects an uncontrolled breakdown of fat and protein to make ketones. Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetics are most at risk. Without insulin, the body will keep creating ketones, raising the level in the blood. Once the levels get above 20 mmol/L the lungs and kidneys are overstressed trying to remove the acid from the blood. Coma and death are possible outcomes if the condition is untreated. Insulin infusion will stop the creation of ketones and allow the level Continue reading >>

More in ketosis