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Drug Induced Metabolic Acidosis

Toxin-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Toxin-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Acid-base disorders, poisoning, toxic, toxins, overdose, metabolic acidosis, acidosis, anion gap metabolic acidosis, strong ion gap acidosis Metabolic acidosis is a common and serious presentation of several toxins. Toxin-induced metabolic acidosis can be due to multiple diverse pathways and can become become evident at various stages and time-frames of the poisoning. These include organic acid production through metabolic pathways, exogenous acid addition, tissue hypoperfusion, renal impairment and cytopathic pathways. These variable pathways and presentations make the diagnosis and treatment challenging, and when a poisoning is suspected, consultation with a regional poison center and toxicologist is hightly recommended. There are numerous toxins that produce acid-base disturbances; however, we will only discuss the most common and serious toxins that result in a metabolic acidosis. The clinical features of metabolic acidosis are similar regardless of the etiology. Depending on the toxin, type and amount of exposure, there may be other specific clinical features. These may include respiratory compensatory signs such as tachypnea and Kussmaul respirations. Hyperventilation (rapid shallow or Kussmaul respirations). Chest pain, cardiac dysrhythmias, palpations. Many poisoned patients are unable to provide a reliable history; therefore, laboratory and other ancillary testing is essential. Some patients will present with classic toxidromes (e.g. opioid, anticholinergic, cholinergic or sympathomimetic), others will have family or friends relay important information regarding recent activity and possible exposure. To adequately assess these patients, it is essential to use a systematic approach, as many different poisons will have subtle overlapping signs and symptoms. Mana Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

Acid-base Physiology

Acid-base Physiology

8.6 Metabolic Acidosis due to Drugs and Toxins Several drugs and toxins have been implicated as direct or indirect causes of a high-anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA). A consideration of these drugs needs to be included in an differential diagnosis of a HAGMA. The three most common ones to consider are methanol , ethylene glycol and salicylates . Other toxins which can cause acidosis are isopropyl alcohol and butoxyethanol. Toluene also causes an acidosis and the anion gap may be normal or elevated. The acidosis caused by these toxins may sometimes present as a normal anion-gap hyperchloraemic acidosis so don't exclude the diagnosis in such a circumstance. Co-ingestion of ethanol delays the metabolism of the more toxic methanol and ethylene glycol but can also delays the diagnosis. In this situation the osmolar gap will be even more elevated than can be explained by the measured ethanol level alone. [See also Section 11.3 : Acid-Base Disorders due to Drugs & Toxins.] Ingestion of methanol can occur accidentally, or deliberately if used as an ethanol substitute. Methanol itself is non-toxic. Onset of symptoms is delayed until the toxic metabolites are produced by theliver. Because the hepatic metabolism is slow, there is usually a considerable latent period (12-48 hours) before any toxic effects develop. Patients presenting early with a history of methanol ingestion have few symptoms due to the methanol (other than mild CNS depression), but may have symptoms due to other drugs or toxins (e.g. ethanol). Additionally co-ingestion of ethanol also contributes to the latent period by delaying metabolism of methanol. Patients presenting late are often deeply comatose and bradycardic with depressed respirations. Survivors have a high incidence of irreversible blindness. Abdo Continue reading >>

Drug And Chemical-induced Metabolic Acidosis.

Drug And Chemical-induced Metabolic Acidosis.

Abstract Metabolic acidosis produced by drugs and/or chemicals can be conveniently divided into those with an increase in the anion gap (anion gap = Na- (Cl + HCO3)) and those with a normal anion gap. The increase in the anion gap is due to the accumulation of unmeasured organic anions, such as lactate or acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate, as occurs in ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis, or the accumulation of toxic anions such as formate or glycolate, as occurs with the ingestion of methanol or ethylene glycol. Increased concentrations of lactic acid may also be present in the toxic forms of metabolic acidosis. The most common drugs and chemicals that induce the anion gap type of acidosis are biguanides, alcohols, polyhydric sugars, salicylates, cyanide and carbon monoxide. In normal anion gap acidosis the reduction in bicarbonate is balanced by a reciprocal increase in the chloride concentration so that the sum of the two remains unchanged. Normal anion gap acidosis is caused by carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, hydrochloride salts of amino acids, toluene, amphotericin, spironolactone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The mechanism by which these substances produce metabolic acidosis and the therapy are discussed. Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis.

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis.

Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75390-8885, USA; Departments of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75390-8885, USA; Baylor Family Medicine Residency at Garland, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75390-8885, USA. Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75390-8885, USA. Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75390-8885, USA; Departments of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75390-8885, USA; Department of Physiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75390-8885, USA. Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics. Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: Background, Etiology, Epidemiology

Lactic Acidosis: Background, Etiology, Epidemiology

Author: Kyle J Gunnerson, MD; Chief Editor: Michael R Pinsky, MD, CM, Dr(HC), FCCP, MCCM more... In basic terms, lactic acid is the normal endpoint of the anaerobic breakdown of glucose in the tissues. The lactate exits the cells and is transported to the liver, where it is oxidized back to pyruvate and ultimately converted to glucose via the Cori cycle. In the setting of decreased tissue oxygenation, lactic acid is produced as the anaerobic cycle is utilized for energy production. With a persistent oxygen debt and overwhelming of the body's buffering abilities (whether from chronic dysfunction or excessive production), lactic acidosis ensues. [ 1 , 2 ] (See Etiology.) Lactic acid exists in 2 optical isomeric forms, L-lactate and D-lactate. L-lactate is the most commonly measured level, as it is the only form produced in human metabolism. Its excess represents increased anaerobic metabolism due to tissue hypoperfusion. (See Workup.) D-lactate is a byproduct of bacterial metabolism and may accumulate in patients with short-gut syndrome or in those with a history of gastric bypass or small-bowel resection. [ 3 ] By the turn of the 20th century, many physicians recognized that patients who are critically ill could exhibit metabolic acidosis unaccompanied by elevation of ketones or other measurable anions. In 1925, Clausen identified the accumulation of lactic acid in blood as a cause of acid-base disorder. Several decades later, Huckabee's seminal work firmly established that lactic acidosis frequently accompanies severe illnesses and that tissue hypoperfusion underlies the pathogenesis. In their classic 1976 monograph, Cohen and Woods classified the causes of lactic acidosis according to the presence or absence of adequate tissue oxygenation. (See Presentationand Differe Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis

SummaryDrug causes of metabolic acidosis are numerous and their mechanisms are diverse. Broadly, they can cause metabolic acidosis with either a normal anion gap (e.g. drug-induced renal tubular acidosis) or an elevated anion gap (e.g. drug-induced lactic acidosis or pyroglutamic acidosis). This review describes the drugs that can cause or contribute to metabolic acidosis during therapeutic use, the mechanisms by which this occurs, and how they may be identified in practice. aNeurointensive Care Unit, St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust bClinical Pharmacology, St George's University of London, London, UK Correspondence to Andrew W. Hitchings, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Pharmacology and Consultant in Neurointensive Care, St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and St George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK. Tel: +44 20 8725 5380; e-mail: [email protected] Editor: R E Ferner, MSc, MD, FRCP, Director of the WestMidlands Centre for Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting and Consultant Physician at City Hospital, Birmingham, UK. Assistant Editor: Mr C Anton, MA, MEng. Editorial Board: Australia: Dr M Kennedy, Professor G M Shenfield, Denmark: Professor J S Schou; England: Dr J K Aronson,Dr A Hitchings; India: Professor N Gogtay; Netherlands: Professor C J van Boxtel, Dr B H Ch Stricker; New Zealand: Dr T Maling; Scotland: Dr D N Bateman; Wales: Professor P A Routledge. Copyright 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Adverse Drug Reaction Bulletin. Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Please try after some time. Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Moe, Orson W. ; Pham, Amy Quynh Trang ; Xu, Li Hao Richie. / Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis . In: F1000Research . 2015 ; Vol. 4. @article{4757cc9a0238471c8ee7bd9f0136f127, title = "Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis", abstract = "Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics.", author = "Moe, {Orson W.} and Pham, {Amy Quynh Trang} and Xu, {Li Hao Richie}", N2 - Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics. AB - Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is i Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic acidosis is a medical condition characterized by the buildup of lactate (especially L-lactate) in the body, which results in an excessively low pH in the bloodstream. It is a form of metabolic acidosis, in which excessive acid accumulates due to a problem with the body's metabolism of lactic acid. Lactic acidosis is typically the result of an underlying acute or chronic medical condition, medication, or poisoning. The symptoms are generally attributable to these underlying causes, but may include nausea, vomiting, rapid deep breathing, and generalised weakness. The diagnosis is made on biochemical analysis of blood (often initially on arterial blood gas samples), and once confirmed, generally prompts an investigation to establish the underlying cause to treat the acidosis. In some situations, hemofiltration (purification of the blood) is temporarily required. In rare chronic forms of lactic acidosis caused by mitochondrial disease, a specific diet or dichloroacetate may be used. The prognosis of lactic acidosis depends largely on the underlying cause; in some situations (such as severe infections), it indicates an increased risk of death. Classification[edit] The Cohen-Woods classification categorizes causes of lactic acidosis as:[1] Type A: Decreased tissue oxygenation (e.g., from decreased blood flow) Type B B1: Underlying diseases (sometimes causing type A) B2: Medication or intoxication B3: Inborn error of metabolism Signs and symptoms[edit] Lactic acidosis is commonly found in people who are unwell, such as those with severe heart and/or lung disease, a severe infection with sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to another cause, severe physical trauma, or severe depletion of body fluids.[2] Symptoms in humans include all those of typical m Continue reading >>

Topiramate-induced Metabolic Acidosis: A Case Study

Topiramate-induced Metabolic Acidosis: A Case Study

Nefrologia (English Version) 2012;32:403-4 | doi: 10.3265/Nefrologia.pre2011.Dec.11308 Topiramate-induced metabolic acidosis: a case study Acidosis metablica inducida por topiramato: a propsito de un caso. We present the case of a 75 year-old male with hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who was diagnosed with chronic delusional disorder and mixed personality disorder, along with partial epilepsy due to a left parietal haematoma from several years prior. The patient was under treatment with topiramate, levetiracetam, quetiapine, sertraline, clobazam, and bronchodilators. He sought treatment for a respiratory infection and functional deterioration consisting of apathy, drowsiness, and periods of aggressive behaviour. A physical examination revealed that the patient had no fever, although he did suffer from disorientation and slurred speech, and would drift off to sleep, but with no apparent focal loss of motor function. The patient also had shallow tachypnoea, widespread rhonchi, and crackles in the left base, with radiological images indicative of superinfection of the abnormally widened bronchial tubes. We performed a laboratory analysis, revealing mildly elevated chlorine (114mEq/l), with normal renal function and all other ion parameters (sodium: 138mEq/l; potassium: 4.2mEq/l), and baseline arterial gasses compatible with a diagnosis of metabolic acidosis (pH: 7.24; pCO2: 33mm Hg; pO2: 67mm Hg; bicarbonate: 17mmol/l; base excess [BE]: -9.1mmol/l). The anion GAP value (difference between serum sodium and the sum of chlorine and bicarbonate) was 7mEq/l. The patient received treatment with systemic steroids and quinolones, with rapid clinical improvement until reaching a normal baseline levels. However, later controls revealed persistent hyperchlorem Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Acid-base Disorders

Drug-induced Acid-base Disorders

Abstract The incidence of acid-base disorders (ABDs) is high, especially in hospitalized patients. ABDs are often indicators for severe systemic disorders. In everyday clinical practice, analysis of ABDs must be performed in a standardized manner. Highly sensitive diagnostic tools to distinguish the various ABDs include the anion gap and the serum osmolar gap. Drug-induced ABDs can be classified into five different categories in terms of their pathophysiology: (1) metabolic acidosis caused by acid overload, which may occur through accumulation of acids by endogenous (e.g., lactic acidosis by biguanides, propofol-related syndrome) or exogenous (e.g., glycol-dependant drugs, such as diazepam or salicylates) mechanisms or by decreased renal acid excretion (e.g., distal renal tubular acidosis by amphotericin B, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin D); (2) base loss: proximal renal tubular acidosis by drugs (e.g., ifosfamide, aminoglycosides, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, antiretrovirals, oxaliplatin or cisplatin) in the context of Fanconi syndrome; (3) alkalosis resulting from acid and/or chloride loss by renal (e.g., diuretics, penicillins, aminoglycosides) or extrarenal (e.g., laxative drugs) mechanisms; (4) exogenous bicarbonate loads: milk–alkali syndrome, overshoot alkalosis after bicarbonate therapy or citrate administration; and (5) respiratory acidosis or alkalosis resulting from drug-induced depression of the respiratory center or neuromuscular impairment (e.g., anesthetics, sedatives) or hyperventilation (e.g., salicylates, epinephrine, nicotine). Notes Continue reading >>

Topiramate And Metabolic Acidosis: An Evolving Story

Topiramate And Metabolic Acidosis: An Evolving Story

Get access/doi/full/10.1080/21548331.2017.1370969?needAccess=true Topiramate is an anticonvulsant that is being increasingly used for a number of different off-label indications. Its inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes can lead to metabolic acidosis, elevated urine pH, reduced urine citrate, and hypercalciuria, thereby creating a milieu that is ripe for calcium phosphate stone formation. In this review, we describe a case of topiramate-induced metabolic acidosis. We review the frequency of metabolic acidosis among children and adults, as well as the mechanism of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and renal tubular acidosis in topiramate users. Finally, we describe the long-term effects of topiramate-induced metabolic acidosis, including nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and bone degradation. Patients who are prescribed topiramate should be carefully monitored for metabolic derangements, and they may benefit from alkali supplementation, or in extreme cases, discontinuation of the drug altogether. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metabolic Acidosis ). Lactic acidosis (due to physiologic processes) Lactic acidosis (due to exogenous toxins) Toluene (initially high gap; subsequent excretion of metabolites normalizes gap) HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors Biguanides (rare except with acute kidney injury) Normal anion gap (hyperchloremic acidosis) Renal tubular acidosis, types 1, 2, and 4 The most common causes of a high anion gap metabolic acidosis are Ketoacidosis is a common complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (see diabetic ketoacidosis ), but it also occurs with chronic alcoholism (see alcoholic ketoacidos Continue reading >>

8drug And Chemical-induced Metabolic Acidosis

8drug And Chemical-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Volume 12, Issue 2 , July 1983, Pages 391-411 8Drug and chemical-induced metabolic acidosis Author links open overlay panel Robert A.Kreisberg Barry C.Wood Get rights and content Metabolic acidosis produced by drugs and/or chemicals can be convenientlydivided into those with an increase in the anion gap (anion gap = Na-(Cl + HCO3)) and those with a normal anion gap. The increase in the anion gap is due to the accumulation of unmeasured organic anions, such as lactate or acetoacetate and -hydroxybutyrate, as occurs in ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis, or the accumulation of toxic anions such as formate or glycolate, as occurs with the ingestion of methanol or ethylene glycol. Increased concentrations of lactic acid may also be present in the toxic forms of metabolic acidosis. The most common drugs and chemicals that induce the anion gap type of acidosis are biguanides, alcohols, polyhydric sugars, salicylates, cyanide and carbon monoxide. In normal anion gap acidosis the reduction in bicarbonate is balanced by a reciprocal increase in the chloride concentration so that the sum of the two remains unchanged. Normal anion gap acidosis is caused by carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, hydrochloride salts of amino acids, toluene, amphotericin, spironolactone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The mechanism by which these substances produce metabolic acidosis and the therapy are discussed. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis Due To Drugs And Toxins

Metabolic Acidosis Due To Drugs And Toxins

3.1.4.7.Metabolic Acidosis due to Drugs and Toxins Metabolic Acidosis due to Drugs and Toxins Several drugs and toxins have been implicated as direct or indirect causes of a high-anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA). A consideration of these drugs needs to be included in an differential diagnosis of a HAGMA. The three most common ones to consider are methanol, ethylene glycol and salicylates. Other toxins which can cause acidosis are isopropyl alcohol and butoxyethanol. Toluene also causes an acidosis and the anion gap may be normal or elevated. * Initially no acid-base disorder due to long latent period while methanol is metabolised * Later, typically develop a high anion gap metabolic acidosis -due to formic acid * May also develop a respiratory acidosis secondary to CNS depression (with depression of respiratory centre and/or airway obstruction) * May occasionally present with normal anion gap acidosis if smaller ingestion * If patient is an alcoholic, there may other types of acidosis present as well (eg alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, respiratory acidosis due aspiration, respiratory alkalosis due chronic liver disease.) Principles of Treatment of Methanol Poisoning Resuscitation: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Obtunded patients require intubation for airway protection and ventilation. Haemodialysis is the most effective technique; it also removes ethanol so ethanol infusion rate must be increased during periods of dialysis This involves competitive inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The aim is to delay the production of the toxic metabolites and limit the peak concentrations achieved. Two agents are currently in use: * Ethanol: "Ethanol blocking" treatment is the traditional treatment but has the disadvantage of causing i Continue reading >>

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