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Doing Everything Right But Not In Ketosis

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

One of the main goals of starting the ketogenic diet is to get your body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. Ketosis occurs when your body has depleted its glycogen stores so blood sugar and insulin levels drop causing the body to look for an alternative fuel source. The fuel source that it begins to use is known as ketones which are produced by enzyme breaking down fat in the liver. 7 Signs You Might Be in Ketosis Testing for ketosis is not the most accurate science. A blood glucose monitor or ketone test strips can show you your ketone levels but these are not always an accurate portrayal of ketosis. Instead, your body does a great job of letting you know when you’re in ketosis and shows you the signs through a number of different ways. Here are things to look out for to see if your body is in ketosis. 1. Weight Loss Weight loss is one of the more obvious signs that your body is entering ketosis. However, the weight loss can be a little deceptive initially due to what is actually being lost. In our Keto Dash program, we find that most of our member lose between 4-6 lbs in the first week of applying the keto diet. This isn’t your body burning fat but finally being able to release the water that was being held by the fat cells due to the drop in insulin. Insulin is one of the main causes of weight gain and when your insulin levels drop, they allow the fat cells to release the water they are holding. When this occurs it then allows the fat cells to enter your bloodstream where they can then enter the liver and be converted by enzymes into ketones. After the initial rapid drop in water weight, you should continue to lose body fat consistently if you are able to stick with the low-carb aspects of the diet and keep your body in a caloric deficit. 2. Loss of Appetit Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

A question a lot of people who start a Ketogenic Diet want to know is, how long does it take to get into ketosis? After all, it is being in a state of ketosis that makes the diet, “ketogenic” in the first place. Being in Ketosis not only supercharges your body to be in an optimal fat-burning zone. It also gives you a longer, sustained energy, enhanced cognition, improved focus and other neuroprotective benefits. The Advantages of Ketosis don’t end there Being on a Ketogenic Diet and having your body rely on fats as its fuel comes with cardiovascular benefits as well. It has been shown that ketosis lowers bad LDL cholesterol while increasing good HDL cholesterol, decreasing a person’s risk of heart disease as well as improving insulin resistance amongst others. There are also studies into the ketogenic diet’s effects on Alzheimers Disease, Bipolar Disorder among others that have shown promising results. The Ketogenic Diet itself was used in the early 1900’s to control epileptic seizures and is still used today for those resistant to seizure medication. But we won’t dive deeply into all of that today. Today we’re going to answer the question, how long does it take to get into ketosis? So, how long does it take to get into Ketosis? Nobody can tell you accurately how long it will take to get into ketosis as the time it takes for your body to start creating ketone bodies varies between individuals. We all have unique metabolisms, varying resistance to insulin, previous diet, and other biological factors that differentiate us from one another. If one were to give a timeframe, it would be safe to say that typically you can expect your body to get into ketosis within a period of 2-10 days if you stick to the recommended macro nutrients. (use our keto calculator Continue reading >>

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

What is a Keto Diet? A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that it will be chosen over any other energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, we produce ketones, which are produced from the breakdown of fats in the liver. The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories but starvation of carbohydrates. Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits. Make keto simple and easy by checking out our 30 Day Meal Plan. Get meal plans, shopping lists, and much more with our Keto Academy Program. Looking for Something Specific? There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical appl Continue reading >>

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

As the COO of Diet Doctor and low-carb enthusiast for years, you would have thought I’d nailed ketosis years ago. I haven’t, and here’s why. Am I still in ketosis? To get into ketosis, the most important thing is to eat maximum 20 grams of digestible carbs per day. When I went low carb in 2012, I followed that advice to the letter – replacing all high-carb foods like potatoes, bread, rice, pasta, legumes, fruit, juice, soda, and candy, with eggs, dairy, meat, vegetables, fats and berries – counting every carb I consumed. I felt great – effortless weight loss, no stomach issues, tons of energy and inspiration. But over time, something changed – I no longer felt as great as I used to. Until recently, I had no idea why. The journey to find out started with a simple question: Am I still in ketosis? The moment of truth At a Diet Doctor dinner a while ago, our CTO, Johan, gently challenged me. “Bjarte, you’re eating quite a lot of protein. Have you measured your ketones lately?”. “No”, I said, feeling slightly defensive, “I’ve never measured my ketones. Should I?”. It was wake-up time. Johan and I grabbed two blood-ketone meters from a dusty drawer, pricked a finger each, and touched the ketone strips. His results came out first – 3.0 mmol/L – optimal ketosis. He looked happy. It was my turn. The ketone meter made a weird beeping sound and the screen started blinking – 0.0 mmol/L – no ketosis whatsoever. What?! I’d been eating strict low carb for years, how could I not be in ketosis? I felt slightly embarrassed, but mainly relieved. Was this the reason I no longer felt great? Experiment 1: Eating less than 60 grams of protein a day Several of my colleagues agreed with Johan – I was eating too much protein. To test that hypothesis, I s Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Do You Need For Ketosis?

How Much Fat Do You Need For Ketosis?

HOW MUCH FAT DO YOU NEED FOR KETOSIS? Often times clients think they didn’t get their ratio of 70-80% fat correctly so they start adding in bulletproof coffee or eating a tablespoon of coconut oil just to correct the ratio. I do not recommend this if you are eating ketosis for weight loss. Your body is a magnificent marvel and can create ketones from the stored fat on your body. So how much fat do you need for Ketosis? As long as your carbs are right (30g or less per day, ideally 20g or less) and your protein is moderate (50-75g a day for most people) then you will be in ketosis where your body can use dietary fat and body fat equally well. So if there isn’t enough dietary fat the body will use stored fat for fuel, exactly what you want for weight loss. So fat should just be eaten until you are full or until you reach your calorie limit for the day whichever comes first. I say calorie limit because early on if you have leptin resistance you can still overeat fat and hold you back. Once leptin resistance is healed, it is hard to overeat fat when carbs and protein are correct. Learn more in my class Beyond Keto (Click Here). If you are a platinum member on Keto-Adapted.com you will get FREE attendance to the class as well as access to exclusive recipes such as the Eggs Florentine Deviled Eggs in the photo below, as well as many other features such as designing your own meal plan capabilities, FREE weekly meetings and access to me to help you along your way! TESTIMONY OF THE DAY I love messages like this!: “After a year of thinking, I’m doing everything right and not losing a pound I am happy to report I lost 4 pounds since last Friday!!! Turns out, I wasn’t doing everything right! Continue reading >>

Why You Aren’t Losing Weight On Keto And What To Do About It

Why You Aren’t Losing Weight On Keto And What To Do About It

Have you hit a weight loss plateau on keto? Do you think you’re doing everything right and the scale still just won’t budge? Well don’t worry, you’re not alone. Many people have trouble losing weight on a ketogenic diet. This is because everybody is different. While the majority of people may do well on conventional keto diet advice, there will always be outliers who don’t respond as well to the same generalized guidelines. This article will outline the most common culprits of stagnating weight loss on a ketogenic diet. Hopefully, by addressing each of these possible areas of concern, you will be able to overcome your weight loss plateau and reach your ideal weight! Are You Actually in Ketosis? Believe it or not, most of the time people aren’t losing weight on keto because they aren’t actually even in ketosis! This is why it is so important to measure ketone levels. When the body runs out of stored glycogen (glucose) and begins burning fat and creating ketones for energy, these ketones circulate through the blood. This is why the gold standard for determining whether or not you are in ketosis is by measuring blood ketones. Ketosis is usually defined as a blood ketone level between 0.5 to 3.0 mM. However, for those who are not ready to invest in a blood ketone meter, there is the cheaper and more convenient option in ketosis urine strips. Ketosis strips are not quite as accurate as a blood ketone meter. This is because they only measure ketones that your body was unable to use. This may be a good way to indicate ketosis when you first begin a keto diet, but once the body becomes more efficient at burning ketones for fuel, less ketones will be excreted in the urine creating a false negative. The Carb Creep Once you start testing ketone levels it can be a lot Continue reading >>

Can't Get Into Ketosis Despite Doing Everything

Can't Get Into Ketosis Despite Doing Everything "right" ... I Think? : Keto

by greater__fool F 27, 5'5" SW: 125, CW: 125, GW: 113, SD 2/6/15 Good morning ketoers! Hopefully this doesn't just turn into a rant, I'm genuinely seeking advice here. I'm starting Day 7 of eating keto today and I feel at a loss because I'm still not in ketosis. I've read the FAQ and just about every keto material I can get my hands on (still need to read Phinney's and McDonald's books but I'm living in Guatemala right now and it's hard to get my hands on them). Anyway, I use MFP to calculate my macros and electrolytes. My average day looks like this: PreBreakfast:Glass of water with these supplements: Omega 3 fish oil, kelp, turmeric, Vitamin D, Niacin1/2 tsp. of lo-sodium salt with potassium washed down with water Breakfast: Bulletproof coffee (8 oz coffee with 2 T butter, 1 T heavy cream, 1-2 eggs) ... we don't have coconut oil in Guate, womp womp Lunch:Cauliflower mash (2 c finely chopped cauliflower sauteed in 2 T olive oil, topped with 2 T butter and salt)2 c. Spinach topped with 1 T extra virgin olive oil, 2 tsp. red wine vinegar, salt and pepper Snack:1/2 scoop soy isolate protein powder 1 stick mozzarella string cheeseCup of homemade beef bone broth with 2 seasoning cubes (2,000 mg sodium) and more potassium salt Dinner:1 serving Caveman Keto's Mexican Spinach Casserole Water: Drink 10 8 oz. glasses throughout the day, about half in the form of green, chammomile, or mint tea. (no sugar added, of course) Sometimes I'm still ravenous at the end of the day, and if so I'll go Rambo on some high-fat mozzarella cheese or keto-buttercream frosting (butter, heavy cream, egg, Stevia, vanilla extract). Haven't developed the tastebuds for Stevia yet so I think I'll give up the latter and explore more keto desserts later on. I haven't "cheated" at all yet by eating carbs. Continue reading >>

5 Common Reasons For Your Keto Diet Not Working

5 Common Reasons For Your Keto Diet Not Working

Uh oh! Is your ketogenic diet not working how you thought it would? It’s a frustrating feeling, for sure — you’ve been following the rules, cutting the carbs, and you’re still not getting into ketosis or seeing any weight loss (if that’s your goal). But not to fear. We’re in the business of helping people get that ketosis blazin’, and that includes you. Let’s blast through your keto worries right now by covering the 5 common reasons for your keto diet not working — and what you can do to fix the issues. NOT TRACKING CARBOHYDRATES Remember that in the ketogenic diet, we want to follow the macronutrient breakdown of low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. This one might seem obvious; after all, keto is ALL about that very-low-carb living, right? But one of the biggest rules of keto success is to track, track, track because extra carbs can otherwise slip in unnoticed. Carbs are everywhere, so as much as you might try to avoid them completely, that’s just not possible. Although carbs generally make up 5% of your diet on keto, the exact amount of how much you can tolerate and still stay in ketosis varies a little by individual. Factors that can affect how your body uses carbs include: It’s a good idea to use a handy tracker and input what you eat to watch your carb amounts, at least for a few weeks so you can see how you react to different foods. Apps are perfect because you can carry them with you anywhere, such as the popular MyFitnessPal. This will help you see exactly how many calories and carbs you’re eating, which will help you continue to mentally monitor everyday foods you eat. NOT TRACKING PROTEIN Along with eating higher fat, many people following keto will also ramp up their lean protein amounts. However, you have to be mindful of how muc Continue reading >>

How To Track Progress On A Ketogenic Diet? 5 Ways For Keto Success

How To Track Progress On A Ketogenic Diet? 5 Ways For Keto Success

2. Take measurements, forget the old scale When it comes to progress in a ketogenic diet, the best and most effective way that Im always recommending my clients is to forget the classic bathroom scale and measure their bodies monthly. Not seeing results on the scale means you may be losing inches and fat, not pounds. A lower body fat percentage means you will be less at risk of developing health issues like heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and many others. Measure your body at the beginning of the month and then at the end and compare the numbers to see how much progress you have actually made. The key body part s to measure are waist, hips, thighs, calves, bust. A body fat analyzer is a sophisticated tool created to measure some metrics related to health and fitness. This modern scale keeps track of your progress in an app that comes with the product. I ordered a body fat analyzer from Amazon this summer out of curiosity. I have this one from RENPHO. The app tracks: I love the fact that it can keep a history and makes charts based on your data. It can be also used by different members of the family. The price very reasonable for such a high-quality item. I recommend you get one of these scales because for me its a good motivator. It has many other functions and the free app syncs with APPLE HEALTH, GOOGLE FIT and FITBIT APP. These types of scales function us a technology called bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) to measure body fat. A very low electrical current is sent to your body. The electrical current runs quickly through water and muscle than bone or fat, the scale measures the speed of the current. After this based on that number, the scale estimates body fat using a multi-step, mathematical formula. If your clothes get loose but you cant see a Continue reading >>

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

These are the top 10 reasons you’re not losing weight on a low carb diet. A great FREE printable for the fridge and an easy reminder to stay on track. Just click on the image below to save the PDF for printing. UPDATE – watch the quick video below. No compatible source was found for this media. Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight Eating LCHF Too Many Carbohydrates – are carbs starting to sneak back into your diet? Be honest and start tracking everything using KetoDietApp. A little treat here and there adds up. Some are more carb sensitive (or insulin resistant) than others. I know that my carbs have to be around 50g/day to be feeling great and in control of my appetite. Lower than that and I will lose a little bit of weight, above that and I know my weight loss will stall. I generally go between 35-70g/day without too much tracking because I have done it for so long. Too Much Fruit – yes I use berries on my breakfast and desserts, but that is it. I allow my children to eat fruit (without gorging) as they are fit, healthy and in the normal weight range. For me, the sugar and fructose in fruit is too much. Sure, enjoy it as a treat and eat only low carb nutritent dense berries. See fruit as an occasional sweet treat. Packed with fibre, antioxidants, nutrients……… “If you are overweight, fruit is not your friend” Too much Dairy – my biggest downfall is milk. I love my lattes and flat whites. Now milk is great, full of protein and calcium, but it also contains about 5% carbs. A latte can range from 9g to 15g carbs depending on the size you choose. Most dairy such as milk, cream and yoghurt contains approximately 4- 5% but you are more likely to drink a large glass of milk, eat a bowl of yoghurt or drink a large latte than eat 250g of full fat cheese Continue reading >>

12 Possible Reasons The Scale Is Not Moving

12 Possible Reasons The Scale Is Not Moving

Okay, first things first…I’ve said it before, a hundred times, and I’ll continue to say it. The scale is a horrible measure of success. Yet, we’ve been trained to believe it is the ULTIMATE measure. So let me start this with one small caveat, you don’t need the number on the scale to feel good about yourself. It’s a number. You’re not. Having said that, I totally understand wanting the scale to cooperate, but sometimes weight can just be stubborn because we have abused our bodies for so long that our body may be defending itself against another deprivation diet. My first response to a stalling scale (besides kicking it and cursing it) is to remind myself this too shall pass and all I need is a little patience. If I am doing everything right and am not violating any “rules” of Keto, then I can just trust the process. That said, there are things you can evaluate. Perhaps there IS something you can do to give the scale a nudge. So what are those things you can evaluate or change? Macros It is entirely possible your macros aren’t right. Your protein may be too high, your fat too low, you could be eating the wrong kinds of carbs or too many. I see a lot of people trying to apply mainstream diet rules to Keto because they have just bought in to the dogma for so long they find it hard to break the cycle and make the paradigm shift. Let it all go and embrace the Keto way! Sleep Are you getting enough sleep? Sometimes lack of sleep can stall weight loss. Artificial sweeteners If they are a regular, daily part of your keto regimen, then that could be holding you back. True, they are calorie free and most of them don’t cause a spike in blood sugar, but there is something about them that stalls weight loss. I have a friend who lost 40 pounds and ALL she change Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

One of the main goals of starting the ketogenic diet is to get your body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. Note: If you don’t know what the ketogenic is all about then check out the Ketogenic Diet: Beginner’s Guide to Keto and Weight Loss. This is when your body starts to produce a lot of ketones to supply energy for your body. Why is this good? Because it means your body has converted from a sugar-burner to a fat-burner. If your body is burning fat for energy then something amazing starts to happen. The fat on your body starts to disappear. But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Besides using test strips or an instrument there are some signs that your body will give. 7 Signs You Might Be in Ketosis These don’t 100% guarantee that your body is in ketosis but if it is in ketosis then these signs will appear. 1. Weight Loss One of the obvious signs of ketosis is weight loss but this can also be pretty deceptive because many people don’t experience the kind of weight loss that they expect. This can happen for a variety of reasons but when you get close to entering ketosis or do enter ketosis you’ll find that you lose a healthy amount of weight quickly. For example, when you switch to low carbs you usually experience significant weight loss in the first week. In fact, my wife lost 12 lbs in the first 28 days of Keto and I lost 13. This isn’t your body burning fat but finally being able to release the water that was being held by the fat cells. If your fat cells don’t release this water then they can’t flow through the bloodstream to be used as fuel so losing water weight is a good thing. After the initial rapid drop in water weight, you should continue to lose body fat consistently if you are able to stick with the low-carb aspects of the diet Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know Before Going On A Low-carb Diet

Everything You Need To Know Before Going On A Low-carb Diet

Much like Oprah, we LOVE bread. So naturally, the thought of cutting it out of our lives (along with any other carbs) is terrifying. But then again, if everyone and their mom (and lots of scientific research) claim that quitting carbohydrates is the key to weight loss, there's got to be something to it, right? Whether it takes the form of Atkins or the Paleo Diet, the low-carb trend has been around for a long time. But chances are you might not fully understand where it came from, how it works, and why experts are torn on whether this eating plan is smart. Here, we break down all of that so you can decide if carb-cutting in the name of weight loss is worth it. What Low Carb Actually Means Depending on who you talk to, there are different definitions of a low-carb diet. Plans can range from 100 grams of carbohydrates per day to zero grams (yikes), says Susan Kleiner, Ph.D, R.D., author of Power Eating. To put that into perspective, a small piece of fruit has about 15 grams of carbs and a banana contains up to 30 grams. For the sake of this article, though, we'll talk about a diet containing 100 grams of carbs per day, for someone who exercises three times a week at a moderate pace. For everyone else, a true low-carb diet would be about 50 grams per day, says Kleiner. What’s Considered a Carb? Unfortunately for Regina George, butter is not a carb. But according to the USDA’s Nutrient Database, lots of foods, including fruits and veggies, contain high amounts of carbohydrates. Though you probably know potatoes and bananas are packed with the carbohydrates, over 20 grams of the macronutrient are also found in a serving of grapes, apples, pears, and cauliflower. Plus, dried fruits, such as apricots, cranberries, and raisins, have a whopping 80 grams per serving. You’ll Continue reading >>

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