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Doing Everything Right But Not In Ketosis

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Weight Loss Plateaus

The Ketogenic Diet And Weight Loss Plateaus

I keep hearing people talk about their weight loss plateaus, and how they can get around them. Some go the extreme route of doing liquid fasting, others will ignore it and keep on keeping on. I wanted to put together a short list of common things that may be wreaking havok on the average ketogenic dieter, and go over some solutions that might help out. Keep in mind, this does not cover everything and it also covers a wide range of topics. As you read this, please read to the end. Don’t form ideas about your own body and apply the things that I am saying with no thought behind it. This is strictly for people that are hitting weight loss plateau’s and need some help. If you have only lost 1 or 2 pounds in a week, that is still weight loss and does not require action against it. Hidden Carbohydrates People on ketogenic diets eat more carbohydrates than they think. They’re hidden in vegetables, nuts, and certain meat products. Yes, that peanut butter you’re chomping on could be causing a problem! Especially if it’s store bought – that stuff is loaded with extra sugar. Some vegetables like Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and squash are common culprits that find their way into our lives on a frequent basis. You might think that they’re low carb, but in large consumption, those carbs really do add up. You can look at the list of the best low carb vegetables we’ve put together, so that you can be more aware of the vegetables you eat. Meat is the center of most of our lives, and there’s sugar everywhere you look. Some bacon is honey smoked, adding unnecessary carbs to an already delicious product. Why the madness? Look for bacon with no sugar added. When you start to look into Italian sausages, chorizo, and canned meats, there’s more carbs than most think. Some b Continue reading >>

7 Mistakes Keto Dieters Make: A Doctor Explains

7 Mistakes Keto Dieters Make: A Doctor Explains

"I was feeling great and doing fantastic when bam, I hit a roadblock I couldn’t overcome," my 43-year-old patient Aimee told me a few months after her initial visit. "Despite massive effort to remain in ketosis and mix up my workouts, the scale wouldn’t budge and my skinny jeans are a little less skinny." As an obstetrician-gynecologist, I frequently find that a ketogenic diet helps my patients lose weight, reduce or eliminate menopausal symptoms, regain sex drive, and so much more. Like Aimee, many patients do beautifully on a keto diet—especially as a keto-alkaline diet—for a while, but then an inevitable plateau occurs. I understand how frustrating those plateaus (which can occur on any diet) can become. Occasionally, frustrated patients consider abandoning their plan when roadblocks hit. I encourage them to stay the course; one study found a long-term ketogenic diet was safe, maintainable, side effects free, and significantly reduced weight while improving health measures like lipid levels. At the same time, you want to do everything possible to break that plateau, so here are the top seven mistakes I see my patients make and how to fix them: You know too many carbs can knock you out of ketosis, but so can too much protein. Protein gets a health halo in the diet world, but on a ketogenic diet too much can prevent your body from getting and staying in ketosis. You needn’t become militant, but aim for moderate protein intake (about 20 percent of your diet) and get about 70 to 80 percent of your diet from healthy fats. When you go on a ketogenic diet, your body can become more acidic, creating chronic inflammation that can stall fat loss. Getting alkaline a week before going keto stacks the fat-loss and health benefits in your favor. Toxins congregate in fat, Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Vs. Low-carb Diet: A Personal Choice

Ketogenic Diet Vs. Low-carb Diet: A Personal Choice

Ketogenic diets (aka keto diets, nutritional ketosis or NK) are currently all the rage, and for good reason. As I wrote in a previous post a few weeks ago, very-low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets (VLCKDs) are extremely effective for weight loss and diabetes, among other things. There's also emerging evidence suggesting they may be beneficial for certain cancers and neurological conditions like Parkinson's disease and ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). Having previously worked in a clinical setting with several patients who had the misfortune of contracting these diseases, I find it very encouraging that following a ketogenic might offer some improvement for them, as well as others in the same boat. I follow a VLCKD and receive a lot of great feedback from others who have also experienced overwhelmingly positive results with this way of eating. I love hearing these success stories, so please keep them coming. However, one reader named Michelle had this to say in the comments section of my recent article: "I don't do well on a very low carb diet; I have to have around 50-70 g's of carbs a day to feel well and function. I guess this is still low carb when compared to the standard diet, but find so much prejudice against me because people say 'If you just stuck to eating VLC you would eventually lose weight and feel better'. This just is not the case with me. I've adapted the LC diet for me and I feel great and I am losing weight steadily. Please folks, stop thinking that one size fits all, it does not! Great site. Thank you for all your efforts." I was disappointed to hear that this woman -- who is most definitely following a low-carb diet and having success doing so -- feels that others are judging her for not restricting carbs to ketogenic levels (generally defined Continue reading >>

How Quickly Can You Expect To Lose Weight When You Eat A Keto Diet?

How Quickly Can You Expect To Lose Weight When You Eat A Keto Diet?

This is one of those questions that gets asked a lot so I wanted to address it in this post. I know that one of the things that excited me about starting the ketogenic diet in the beginning was reading about all these crazy weight loss success stories that some women seemed to experience. You know, the ones where they lose 14 pounds in the first three weeks and then continue to lose 4 pounds a week for the next 6 months and voila they’re at their ideal weight. I loved the thought of getting into a fat burning state and just watching the excess pounds melt away. In actuality, it took me about a year to lose 30 pounds. However it didn’t take a year for me to start feeling and looking a great deal better, though. This actually happened in a matter of weeks. Every Woman is Different The thing about losing weight on the keto diet is every woman is different. Those who have a lot of excess fat will find that it comes off more quickly. Those who have a lot of metabolic derangement or hormonal healing to do will find that it takes longer. Your body’s main goal is always survival and health. It doesn’t care about how it looks, it cares about how it’s functioning. When you start eating keto with weight loss in mind, you kind of have to trust the process. What you are doing is feeding your body all the nutrients it needs to heal, build, release and do whatever it needs to do in order to move towards optimal health. Some women will experience this as a fairly drastic weight loss, and others will experience this as a slow weight loss. If you have a great deal of healing and balancing to do internally, you may even experience a little weight gain in the beginning. (I know, few women want to hear this). Embarking on a journey of health is a little like embarking on a journey Continue reading >>

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

These are the top 10 reasons you’re not losing weight on a low carb diet. A great FREE printable for the fridge and an easy reminder to stay on track. Just click on the image below to save the PDF for printing. UPDATE – watch the quick video below. No compatible source was found for this media. Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight Eating LCHF Too Many Carbohydrates – are carbs starting to sneak back into your diet? Be honest and start tracking everything using KetoDietApp. A little treat here and there adds up. Some are more carb sensitive (or insulin resistant) than others. I know that my carbs have to be around 50g/day to be feeling great and in control of my appetite. Lower than that and I will lose a little bit of weight, above that and I know my weight loss will stall. I generally go between 35-70g/day without too much tracking because I have done it for so long. Too Much Fruit – yes I use berries on my breakfast and desserts, but that is it. I allow my children to eat fruit (without gorging) as they are fit, healthy and in the normal weight range. For me, the sugar and fructose in fruit is too much. Sure, enjoy it as a treat and eat only low carb nutritent dense berries. See fruit as an occasional sweet treat. Packed with fibre, antioxidants, nutrients……… “If you are overweight, fruit is not your friend” Too much Dairy – my biggest downfall is milk. I love my lattes and flat whites. Now milk is great, full of protein and calcium, but it also contains about 5% carbs. A latte can range from 9g to 15g carbs depending on the size you choose. Most dairy such as milk, cream and yoghurt contains approximately 4- 5% but you are more likely to drink a large glass of milk, eat a bowl of yoghurt or drink a large latte than eat 250g of full fat cheese Continue reading >>

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is ketosis safe? The truth is that we can’t say for certain that it is 100% safe. Humans don’t understand everything under the branch of nutritional science and probably won’t for a very long time. As an individual, the only thing you can do is take a look at the research yourself and form your own conclusion. Personally, through the reading I’ve done and the experience I’ve had with the Keto diet, I’ve formed my own conclusion that ketosis is safe. Could I be wrong? Absolutely. But I could also be right. I’m willing to take that risk in order to follow a diet which could maximize longevity, well being and function. My personal conclusion shouldn’t matter to you though. You need to do your own research and come to your own conclusion. I’ve put together this post to organize all of the issues surrounding the safety of ketosis so that you can make your own decision. In trying to prove something to be safe there are two ways to go about it. Disprove the claims of danger Show evidence which may be correlated with safety This article will dispel the top 10 claims people make in an argument to label ketosis as dangerous. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. The following data is not meant to 100% prove or disprove the safety of ketosis. It’s merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional strategy we feel is best for ourselves. I’m not a doctor or a researcher. The following information is material I’ve collected in my attempt to feel confident following a Keto diet indefinitely. Most of it is sourced from doctors or authors although I have also included anecdotal accounts from experiences posted on message boards and Reddit. I know, much of the information here isn’t sourced directly from s Continue reading >>

Five Steps To Jumpstart The Ketogenic Diet

Five Steps To Jumpstart The Ketogenic Diet

In this post we will take a look at how Heads Up Health can help you successfully navigate the challenges of implementing and maintaining a ketogenic diet. In particular, we will introduce tools that can help you track your progress, fine tune your approach and find exactly what works for your own body as you adopt a low-carb ketogenic lifestyle. If you want to skip ahead and start logging some data now, use the button below to create your account. Or read on for our “Five Steps to Jumpstart the Ketogenic Diet.” Step 1 – Master Your Macronutrients (Protein, Fat & Carbs) The hardest part about going keto, especially for beginners, is learning how to adjust your food intake to meet the requirements of a ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet is a low-carb diet (25 grams of carbs per day is a common starting point). The rest of your daily calories will come from protein and fat, the exact amounts of each depend on your goals (muscle building, fat loss, endurance athletics, disease management etc.). If you’ve never counted calories or read food labels before, learning how to correctly adjust your diet can be tricky at first. Start by calculating your target protein, fat, carb and calorie goals by using a macronutrient calculator designed for ketogenic diets. We’ve included a few good calculators in the appendix. Example: When I first came off the Standard American Diet and started keto for general weight loss, I set a goal of 80% fat/15% protein/5% carbs. It took a few weeks of trial and error to learn which foods I could to eat in order to reach my goals, but it got easier with practice. Over the course of about six months my weight dropped from 197 pounds to 184 pounds and my body fat dropped from 24% to 20%. Overall I was very pleased with these initial results. On Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Right For You?

The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Right For You?

The ketogenic diet is two things: low in carbs and high in fat. Unlike an Atkins diet, which is low in carbs and high in protein, a ketogenic diet relies on healthy fats to fuel the body. Ketogenic dieters follow this way of eating because of the impact carbohydrates have on their glucose and insulin levels. These dieters stay in a state of ketosis which allows the body to run on ketones for full. This is not to be confused with ketoacidosis which is a life-threatening condition for diabetics. While many people do the ketogenic diet for weight loss, some use a ketogenic diet for health problems like diabetes, epilepsy, celiacs disease and other medical conditions. Examples of foods consumed on the ketogenic diet When following the ketogenic diet, certain foods are prohibited. Sugar and grains are off-limits on a ketogenic diet. This means most breads, cereals, fruits, and starchy vegetables are not to be consumed. The standard American diet includes many foods and food groups that ketogenic eaters wont touch. But on the flip side, the ketogenic (or keto) diet allows a lot of foods many other diet plans do not. Many traditional diets limit fattening foods, but the ketogenic diet actually encourages eating fat. As long as that fat isnt coupled with carbs, the diet appears effective. To stay in ketosis, most people must consume less than 50 net carbs per day. However, this varies by person. Some people who are very active can consume more net carbs per day. Others who are sedentary or have particularly slow metabolisms may need to consume fewer than 50 net carbs per day. Many hardcore ketogenic dieters consume less than 20 net carbs per day. But how can you do this when almost every food has carbs? A typical ketogenic breakfast may include eggs, bacon, and avocado. Avocad Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

In Ketosis, But Not Losing Weight?

In Ketosis, But Not Losing Weight?

In ketosis, but not losing weight? If so, you are not the only one. Many people hit plateaus eventually… Some sooner, and some later than others. A ketogenic diet is a diet consists of high fats and high proteins, with carb intake at only 50 grams of carbs or less per day. The reason this diet has become so popular is because of the dramatic weight loss that happens in the first 4 weeks of following it. The point of a ketogenic diet is to turn the switch in your body from using carbs as energy, to using fats (lipids) as energy. The results can be pretty fast, but there are downsides. The first 3 days of starting a ketogenic diet is referred to as the keto flu because of how it affects your body and mind. The most common side effects of the keto flu are headaches, irritability, mood swings, diarrhea, and energy loss. The keto flu is the point in time when your body is switching from using carbs as energy and produces ketones that signals the body to use fat as energy. Let’s talk about a few different scenarios that can be the cause of a weight loss plateau during a keto diet. Calorie Intake The single most important part of losing weight for any kind of diet that is out there is of course your calorie intake – a lot of people on a keto diet come to the conclusion that they can eat anything as long as there are very little or no carbs. It’s only true to an extent. Sure, you can eat things like bacon, ham, hot dogs, burgers, etc, but you still have to intake the right amount of calories. Just because your body is using fat as energy, does not mean you can eat a ton of calories. You can eat absolutely no carbs, but if your calorie intake is high, you are not able to lose weight and in fact will gain weight if too many calories are taken in. Exercise The next problem Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones Pros And Cons

Exogenous Ketones Pros And Cons

What Are Exogenous Ketones? Exogenous Ketones (EK for short) are ketone supplements and by definition, a supplement is a thing added to something else in order to complete or enhance it. Think about it like building muscle, good supplements can enhance your results, but if you don’t eat right and exercise, supplements are just useless. You can’t just sit on the couch to watch TV, eat potato chips all day and drink some supplements and expect to gain muscle. A supplement is not a miracle. It’s just an addition and before you add it to your diet, you need to get the basic right first, which is dieting and exercise in the case of building muscles. The supplements are not going to lift the heavy weights for you. You do! Back to the case of EK. If you cheat on your keto diet and eat a ton of carbs, and you want to use EK as a way to feel better and less guilty about it, it’s probably not a smart choice because EK won’t do anything for you (more on this later). However, if you are eating LCHF and somehow you’re not feeling your best, EK can be helpful and we will explain more below. Our Approach We own and manage a few growing Keto Facebook groups with tens of thousands of members and we often see the exogenous ketones topic comes up. We have seen a lot of confusion and criticism as well as support from our members. Most of the complaints are normally because of the expensive price of some products, the lack of understanding about what the product is and what it does to your body or because some sellers/promoters try to bend the truth to get you buy their products or recruit you into their multi level marketing team. We recently ran a survey in our private group and asked people if they have used EK before and if it worked for them. Here’s the result: Many peopl Continue reading >>

Machine Learning Meets Ketosis: How To Effectively Lose Weight (2016) | Hacker News

Machine Learning Meets Ketosis: How To Effectively Lose Weight (2016) | Hacker News

This was great to read. I know you can't read into the loss/gain chart too deeply, but it does go along anecdotally with what I found worked for me. Sleep length seemed to be the #1 factor for me. Even when doing everything right diet-wise, if I did not get enough nightly sleep, it would hinder my progress. I've also had the issue of going consistently low-carb and not being able to keep it going more than a few months at a time just because the majority of my taste preferences tend to lean toward carbs. Never feeling fully satisfied eventually chips away at me, then I start doing cheat days, then I go all the way back in, sometimes worse than I started. It's just not fully sustainable for me. There's a balance of sleep, lower carb/processed sugar intake (but not LC diet low), even slight exercise, and intermittent fasting that seems like it would be the sweet spot, but I've yet to hit it... I think I'm just not trying hard enough, especially when it comes to sleep. Did you find sustained gains from increased sleep? I found that the increased losses are just due to the loss of carbon dioxide while sleeping. I lose 2 pounds in a typical 6 hour sleep. If I sleep 9 hours this can go up to 2.5-3.5 pounds. It took me a while to realize it was the length of sleep as it averaged out to be meaningless but had me searching for foods or activities as the cause. If I slept 5-6 hours a night, my progress would plateau markedly. If I slept 7-10 hours a night, it would keep going at a pretty good rate. Every time I got poor sleep, my weight loss would plateau a couple of days. I wish I had kept more data. I need to try some kind of balance/plan again. I've gained about 10 back of the 35-40 I lost. I guess the bright side is that I've kept 25-30 off for over 12-18 months at this poin Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Diet And Is It Right For You?

What Is The Keto Diet And Is It Right For You?

What is the keto diet and is it right for you? The eating philosophy is getting a lot of buzz, but it may not be right for everyone. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carb diet that sends your body into a state of ketosis, during which it uses stored fat as energy.Westend61 / Getty Images Feb. 22, 2018, 10:59 AM UTC/UpdatedFeb. 22, 2018, 4:13 PM UTC While the buzz seems to be heating up around the ketogenic diet, the eating philosophy isn't new. In fact, its been used as a treatment for epilepsy since the 1920s and came back into the spotlight in the 90s when Dateline ran a segment highlighting it as a treatment option. But how did it go from epilepsy treatment to weight-loss regimen? Well, for starters, more and more celebs including Vanessa Hudgens and Halle Berry have recently praised its weight-loss results publicly. So what is the ketogenic diet? Its a high-fat, low-carb diet that sends your body into a state of ketosis, during which it uses stored fat as energy. When you eat this way typically were talking less than 50 grams of carbohydrates a day youll consume an enormous amount of fat, says Shahzadi Devje , RD, CDE, a dietitian in Toronto, Canada. In fact, by following the keto diet, about 60 to 80 percent of your daily calories will come from fat. When you restrict carbs this way and eat more fat, your body takes about 24 to 48 hours to begin producing ketones, which are created when your body metabolizes fat for energy, says Pegah Jalali, MS, RD, a clinical coordinator at the New York University Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, where she counsels patients on the ketogenic diet. Normally, your body would metabolize carbohydrates as a primary source of energy . By following the keto diet, about 60 to 80 percent of your daily calories will come from fat. When Continue reading >>

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