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Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Stones

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones may not be on your mind when beginning a weight-loss diet, but if you plan to follow a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet plan, they should be. While many popular low-carb commercial diet plans encourage your body to shift into a fat-burning state called ketosis, the production of ketones that results can alter your urine chemistry and raise the risk of kidney stones. Understanding the risks to your kidneys can help you decide whether the weight loss promises of a high-protein, low-carb diet are worth it. Video of the Day Kidney stones develop when a hard mass of crystals develops in the urinary tract. Kidney stones are often extremely painful, especially when they pass through the thin ureter to exit the body. There are a few different types of kidney stones, each made up of different materials. The cause of kidney stones remains unknown, but some people seem to be more prone to developing them than others, so there may be a hereditary component. Ketones are compounds formed by the breakdown of fat as the body shifts from burning carbohydrates to burning fat for fuel. During a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, ketones become the main source of energy in the body. After a few days or weeks on this type of diet, the brain begins to use ketones as fuel instead of glucose. However, when too many ketones build up in the bloodstream, the pH of the urine changes from neutral to slightly acidic, which can put stress on the kidneys and potentially raise the risk of developing kidney stones. A 2002 study published in the "American Journal of Kidney Diseases" found that a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet raised the acidity of the blood over a six-week period, a condition known to contribute to kidney stones. The study found up to a 90-percent increase in acid Continue reading >>

Do Low-carb Diets Increase Kidney Stone Risk? Let’s Ask The Low-carb Experts

Do Low-carb Diets Increase Kidney Stone Risk? Let’s Ask The Low-carb Experts

People have all sorts of ideas about low-carb diets based on what they’ve heard somewhere or just on what they think they know about them. It’s why concepts like “artery-clogging” saturated fats still pervade our culture despite all the scientific evidence to the contrary. It doesn’t help that these myths surrounding healthy carbohydrate-restricted diets are perpetuated on a daily basis by so many so-called health “experts” in both the medical and nutrition fields and the general public is none-the-wiser to contradict any of it since they are merely living their lives and trusting the sources of information they are paying attention to. It’s what makes the idea of creating a cultural shift in thinking in favor of low-carb living that much more difficult–but it won’t deter me or the many others who are out here fighting the good fight to educate, encourage and inspire others to give livin’ la vida low-carb a try for themselves. I literally receive hundreds upon hundreds of e-mails daily from readers who are searching for answers to their questions about their low-carb lifestyle, help with weight loss, or managing some chronic disease they are dealing with. Although I’m not a doctor or nutritionist, I’m always happy to share from my own experiences to see if that information can be beneficial to the person who wrote to me. It’s my pleasure to hear from readers and to offer up assistance in any way that I can. However, from time to time I’ll receive an e-mail from a reader who has an interesting question that is beyond my scope of full understanding enough to share a detailed explanation of what’s possibly going on. It’s okay that I don’t know everything there is to know about nutrition and it’s relationship to being healthy. The good Continue reading >>

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

The use of exogenous ketones is a new and novel technology. So the safety profile of a ketone supplement like KETO//OS begins to emerge as more research is being done. Often people are concerned about kidney or liver health when it comes to exogenous ketones. What the studies are actually finding, is that ketones, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is actually beneficial to the health of our liver and kidneys. There are also many other benefits of taking ketones as well. The risk of kidney stones can be a concern, as we know there is a small risk from a ketogenic diet standpoint. However, potassium supplementation decreases that risk of getting kidney stones substantially. Exogenous ketone and potassium supplementation while following a ketogenic diet, is an effective combination. To learn more about, and order exogenous ketones, go to the Prüvit online store. Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Personally, I was wondering if part of the problem might have been PUFA intake. These diets are ketogenic but not paleo and many people think PUFA and grain oils are the healthier fats so the general populace would probably be targeting these kinds of fats. Plus the consumption of mostly muscle meats is likely with little to no emphasis on organ meats. Fruit intake would be nonexistant and veggies are not universally liked. Seems like an easy recipe for a diet that in some cases would be deficient in some important nutrients like magnesium. Of course, then all ketogenic diets are then blamed as dangerous when it could be simply an issue of imbalance and lack of certain nutrients, probably those that co occur with carbs but would exist in higher quantities in the less favored types of meat like grassfed or organ meats. Since neither the innuit nor the masai have a big problem with kidney stones, then it's probably not the ketogenic diet itself that is the problem. I think the scientists are missing the important point of all the clues they have been given about what may cause kidney stones. They are assuming it is the ketogenic diet itself but not looking beyond that to reasons why it may not be. IMO, what they should be looking for is what is diff about the diets of these kidney stone patients compared to other ketogenic diets that do not result in kidney stones. "...what can be done to ameliorate such a risk? In order to ameliorate the risk, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where this treatment was invented, give large amounts of potassium citrate to these children as a preventative measure. The standard dose is 2 mEq/kg per day. This is a very large dose. For a 150 lb adult, it would be nearly 15 grams per day. That's the amount in an entire bottle of over-the-count Continue reading >>

© 2017 University Of Chicago Kidney Stone Evaluation And Treatment Program

© 2017 University Of Chicago Kidney Stone Evaluation And Treatment Program

Our Tasty Villain Salt, sodium chloride, part of our commons, our everyday, and central altogether in prevention of kidney stones. My recent article on the use of 24 hour urine collections was about stone risk: Supersaturation, and the key 24 hour urine components that affect supersaturation – volume, calcium, oxalate, citrate, and pH. Of these five components we think first about water when we treat patients to lower supersaturation: Fluid Prescription; Thirst for Variety; How to Drink Enough Water. But, if we are wise, we should think next about salt, and how to lower it, because in so many people it is a key to treatment success. It is key because sodium chloride strongly controls urine calcium and therefore the risk of kidney stones. Likewise, it is key because high intakes can cause loss of bone mineral and raise blood pressure in some people. I say sodium chloride because other sodium salts, like sodium bicarbonate, do not behave exactly as sodium chloride does. But this lack of generality is irrelevant, as it is indeed mostly sodium chloride we eat, and as we eat it entrain the problems this simple molecule can produce. How To Read This Article This topic is very complex and many will want only the general idea, some will want the details. I have put brief summaries in each section. Some sections are all summaries. They are sufficient to get the meaning of the whole article. For those with an adventurous heart and a taste for the subject, the regular text is reasonably exacting and referenced. If you take nothing more away from this article, think about this: Salt and its effects and fates are big stuff in human biology. That pizza is delicious, but that salt is something to think about. How Does Sodium Get Into the Body? It gets in with food. That is the only Continue reading >>

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Once upon a time, fat was the enemy of dieters. Nearly every product on the grocery store shelves had its “low-fat” version. Low-fat dressing. Low-fat cheese. Low-fat chips. Low-fat processed meats. Low-fat cookies. Low-fat freezer meals. It didn’t matter if the food itself was terrible for you and completely devoid of any nutrients (or even real food)… as long as it was “low-fat,” it was marketed as healthy for you. It was the way to lose weight for good. But then science begin to show us that fat wasn’t the enemy after all. In fact, eating plenty of healthy fats was the key to optimal health – and even sustainable weight loss. And today we have a diet rapidly growing in popularity that says, “Not only is fat good for you, you should be eating MOSTLY fat.” That’s right, I’m talking about the keto diet. Discover in just 7 short questions why you may be experiencing painful kidney stones and uncover how to return to your normal life. Take The Kidney Quiz Now! As with any unique diet plan, there are those who believe in it religiously and will “proselytize” to anyone who is listening. Then there are those who adamantly believe it to be dangerous. But one concern that pops up quite frequently from those who are skeptical is kidney stones. Can the keto diet encourage the formation of kidney stones? I’m here to help you examine that question. We’re going to learn more about the keto diet and what it does to your body. Then we are going to look at the science behind kidney stones and high-fat/low-carb dieting to see if the keto diet should be embraced or avoided if you suffer from kidney stones. What Is The Keto Diet? Though trendy now, the keto diet is not a new thing. It’s actually been around since the 1920s. In simple terms, the keto diet Continue reading >>

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

What’s it all about? Is it good for you? Is it bad for you? What’s it like? How do I ‘do’ ketosis? How do I know I’m in ketosis? The questions everyone who’s Banting wants the answers to. Ketosis, in chef speak, is quite simply a state your body enters once it has been deprived of glucose. Your body switches to burning fat for energy (stored fat or fat that you have eaten) instead of glucose. A side-effect of that process is the release of ketone bodies into the blood stream. When you’re starved of glucose, your body has no choice but to burn fat for fuel, so it needs little explanation as to why ketosis works at melting fat like a blow heater on an ice sculpture. Ketosis comes with some added extras, namely a commonly noted sense of euphoria or lucidity and increased energy levels. A downside includes toothbrush-proof halitosis, which stems from the secretion of ammonia through the lungs as a side effect of burning all that fat. Some people on low-carb diets have reported kidney stones, gallstones and a number of other ailments. Scientific research on both sides of this debate is being done all the time, but in our experience from talking to the members of our community and tracking their data, it is generally a case of what was done before they started Banting and not Banting itself. But, this post isn’t here to debate that, it serves as a ‘how to’ and not as a ‘you should’. Eat more buttery or creamy sauce on your steak and eat less steak. Your body can convert protein into glucose so too much meat will hinder your progress. What doIdo? Theoretically it is very easy. Avoid anything with high carbs in it. If you’re not sure what those might be, consult the Real Meal Revolution ‘Red List’. Even dipping your toe into the red list will ruin Continue reading >>

Can Ketogenic Diet Be The Cause Of Kidney Stones?

Can Ketogenic Diet Be The Cause Of Kidney Stones?

Nowadays, often we either suffer from kidney stone problem or we hear that our familiar persons are suffering from kidney stone. Most of us even believe that the diet habits of low-carb can be the cause of this problem. Before going into the arguments we must know why do we have kidney stones? Reason for kidney stones Generally, kidney stones are the crystal hard mass that get its form in our urinary tract. Obviously, it is tremendously painful, especially when it goes by the thin ureter in the body. Kidney stones are of different types, but the exact cause of kidney stones are still unknown. It is also true some people are prone to get the kidney stones in their body. Thus, we are not sure that ketogenic diet kidney stones are interlinked. What is the ketogenic diet? A low-carb diet is also known as the ketogenic diet. In these diets, we get protein and fat. The ketogenic diet produces ketosis and this is a condition of the body in which it uses the ketones and fat to burn the fat molecules to make the fuel in the body. This is the basic source of energy or fuel. These diets control your appetite and support to burn the fat, as a result you lose your weight. Benefits of ketogenic diet The ketogenic diet means controls of protein, fat, and carbohydrates which you take as you can only consume maximum fifty grams of carbohydrates per day. These diets not only help to reduce your body weight, but it also helps in certain diseases like epilepsy or malignant brain cancer, etc. However, after having too many ketones in the body, your urine changes into acidic and this gives stress to your kidneys which ultimately changes into kidney stones. Thus, ketogenic diet kidney stones are having the link to each other. Some people who intake too much of meat, fish or poultry protein al Continue reading >>

Gout And Low Carb

Gout And Low Carb

It’s occasionally claimed that low-carb or keto diets high in meat often cause gout. This does not appear to be true (nor does a low-carb diet have to be high in meat). However, there may possibly be a temporary increase in risk of gout during the first six weeks on a strict low-carb diet. After this initial time period, a low-carb diet is likely neutral, or even protective, when it comes to gout. Keep reading to find out what gout is and how to avoid it. What gout is Gout is a sudden and painful inflammation of a joint, most often at the base of the big toe (see image). It may also affect other joints, like heels, knees, wrists and finger joints. The cause of gout is elevated levels of uric acid in the blood, resulting in crystals depositing in the affected joint. Gout is more common in people who are overweight and have metabolic syndrome, and have thus become more common in recent decades, affecting about 6% of adult men and 2% of women (it’s even more common in older people). 1 Historically, it was known as “the disease of kings” or a “rich man’s disease”, but now everyone can afford… sugar. Meat and gout Gout has often been blamed on excessive consumption of meat. This is because the uric acid that causes gout is a breakdown product of purines, a building block of protein, that is highly concentrated in meat. However, avoiding meat seems to have little effect on the risk of gout, and even vegetarians get gout much more often than would be expected if this was the main cause. Eating more protein (like meat) seems to increase the excretion of uric acid from the kidneys, through the urine, thus not having much of an effect on the blood uric acid levels… or the risk of gout. Sugar and gout As there is a very strong connection between gout, obesity, ty Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

Daily Potassium Citrate Wards Off Kidney Stones In Seizure Patients On High-fat Diet

Daily Potassium Citrate Wards Off Kidney Stones In Seizure Patients On High-fat Diet

Children on the high-fat ketogenic diet to control epileptic seizures can prevent the excruciatingly painful kidney stones that the diet can sometimes cause if they take a daily supplement of potassium citrate the day they start the diet, according to research from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. A report on the work is published in the August issue of Pediatrics. “We can confidently say this is a safe and powerful way to prevent kidney stones, and it should become part of standard therapy in all ketogenic dieters, not just those who already show elevated urine calcium levels,” says senior investigator Eric Kossoff, M.D., a pediatric neurologist at Hopkins Children’s. “If you wait, it might be too late.” The ketogenic diet, believed to work by initiating biochemical changes that eliminate seizure-triggering short circuits in the brain’s signaling system, is given to many children whose seizures do not respond to medications. But the diet, which consists of high-fat foods with very few carbohydrates, causes a buildup of calcium in the urine and the formation of kidney stones in about 6 percent of those on it. Hopkins Children’s adopted the preventive treatment with potassium citrate two years ago, and doctors now believe this one major side effect of the diet is a thing of the past, allowing more children to remain on the diet for longer. Potassium citrate taken twice daily, either as powder sprinkled on food or dissolved in water, is believed to inhibit stone formation. In their study of 301 children treated for epilepsy with the ketogenic diet at Hopkins Children’s the researchers found that those who got potassium citrate twice daily were seven times less likely to develop kidney stones — one of 106 (0.9 percent) developed a kidney stone compared Continue reading >>

Celebs Over 40 Are Obsessed With The Keto Diet. Here’s Everything You Need To Know Before Trying It.

Celebs Over 40 Are Obsessed With The Keto Diet. Here’s Everything You Need To Know Before Trying It.

There was once a time when low-fat cookies, chips, and peanut butter were considered “healthy choices.” Oh, how times have changed! Ever since studies began surfacing showing that low-carb, high-fat diets can be more effective for weight loss than low-fat plans, more and more health-conscious folks have fully embraced fat. Sales of whole-fat milk and yogurt have soared in recent years, and most nutritionists now tell their clients to incorporate fatty foods like fish, avocado, and olive oil into their diets. The reemergence of all this creamy goodness has led to a century-old diet making a major comeback: the ketogenic diet. Celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow and Mick Jagger are both rumored to have taken the plan for a test drive. (Got 10 minutes? Then you've got time to lose the weight for good with Prevention's new 10-minute workouts and 10-minute meals. Get Fit in 10: Slim and Strong for Life now!) Those following the keto diet plan eat a lot of fat and just a few carbohydrates. More specifically, 80% of the diet is comprised of fat, 15% is protein, and a mere 5% of calories come from carbohydrates. For someone on a 1,500-calorie diet, that translates to 19 grams of carbohydrates per day, which is less than what you find in a cup of green peas. (For some context, most people’s diets contain 55% carbohydrates, 30% fat, and 15% protein.) The idea is that if you deplete yourself of carbohydrates, the brain’s preferred fuel source, your body will start breaking down fat for energy. When this occurs, the body goes into a state of ketosis. But does this really fuel weight loss or make us healthier? According to one Spanish study of 20 obese adults, the answer is yes. For the study, participants were put on a low-calorie keto diet and lost an average of 40 pound Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Is A Natural Treatment For The Symptoms Of Gout

The Ketogenic Diet Is A Natural Treatment For The Symptoms Of Gout

A new study published in the journal Cell Reports suggests that a ketogenic (high fat, low carb) diet may be helpful in treating the symptoms of gout. Gout is something that plagues more and more people every day, and it’s caused from uric acid buildup in the body. What is Gout? Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops in some people who have high levels of uric acid in the blood. The acid can form needle-like crystals in a joint and cause sudden, severe episodes of pain, tenderness, redness, warmth and swelling Uric acid, a normal byproduct of metabolic processes, is typically dissolved in the blood and then excreted from the body through the urine. However, when the body is unable to properly break down uric acid, blood levels rise, and the excess is deposited in bodily tissues. When uric acid accumulates around the joints it is known as “tophi,” and can manifest as jelly like lumps under the skin. When uric acid crystals collect in the kidneys, it can result in kidney stones. The Role Of a Ketogenic Diet Ketogenic diet may protect against gout. … It is caused by either an excessive production or insufficient excretion of uric acid. In gout, the uric acid crystals sediment in tissues and fluids, triggering the body’s immune cells. Recent research out of the laboratory of Vishwa Deep Dixit, professor of comparative medicine and immunobiology at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, suggests that symptoms of gout may be managed with a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets are typically implemented for weight loss, or to treat childhood epilepsy. The diet involves a significant reduction of carbohydrate intake favoring moderate protein and high fat foods. This starves the central nervous system of glucose and prompts the liver to metabolise fats pro Continue reading >>

Supplement Averts Kidney Stones In Ketogenic Diet

Supplement Averts Kidney Stones In Ketogenic Diet

LITTLE FALLS, N.J., July 22 -- Potassium citrate prevents kidney stones in epileptic children who are on the ketogenic diet, researchers have found. Giving prophylactic potassium citrate to any child who went on the diet reduced the risk of kidney stones from 6.7% to 0.9%, Eric H. Kossoff, MD, of Johns Hopkins, and colleagues reported online in Pediatrics. "We can confidently say this is a safe and powerful way to prevent kidney stones, and it should become part of standard therapy in all ketogenic dieters, not just those who already show elevated urine calcium levels," Dr. Kossoff said. The high-fat, ketogenic diet is used to control epileptic seizures in children who don't respond to medication. But the diet comes with a high risk of kidney stones, which occur in about 6% of children who adhere to it. The researchers theorized that daily potassium citrate, a supplement that alkalinizes the urine and makes urine calcium soluble, could reduce the risk of kidney stones. So they followed 313 children treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital from Jan.1, 2000 to Dec. 31, 2008. Those receiving treatment before 2005 were treated with daily potassium citrate only after being diagnosed with hypercalciuria. Those treated in 2006 or thereafter got the supplement as soon as they started the ketogenic diet. Among children who didn't receive the supplement at all, 10.5% developed kidney stones. In both treatment groups, preventive use decreased the incidence of kidney stones compared with those who didn't receive the supplement at all, the researchers said (P=0.003). But the larger decrease occurred in the youngsters who started the supplement as soon as they started the diet, with a kidney stone incidence of 0.9% compared with an incidence of 6.7% for those who received it only as a respo Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Really Bad For You?

Is Ketosis Really Bad For You?

A patient recently asked me how bad being in nutritional ketosis was for her. I responded that the worse problem I’ve seen recently is the patient that broke his toe when he slipped on bacon grease. Are there risks with a ketogenic diet? Yes, but these usually only occur when you cheat or fall off the wagon. What problems can arise? Lets talk about them individually. First, as I stated above, make sure you don’t slip on bacon the grease. It really can be an issue if you’re not used to using increased amounts of fat in your kitchen. So, be prepared for how to cook and use fat. Grandma understood this well, we could learn a great deal from her if you ask her about using bacon grease. Second, let’s define the difference between ketosis and keto-acidosis and try to clarify the misinformation that is being spread around the blogosphere. A ketone is a molecule the body produces from the breakdown of fat (specifically triglycerides) and some proteins (amino acids). There are specifically three types of ketones: beta-hydroxybutyric acid, acetoacetic acid and acetone. If ketosis was “bad,” then why would our bodies produce these molecules? They are not bad, and in fact, multiple studies show that the body is often more efficient in weight loss, inflammatory reduction, bowel function, epigenetic influence and maintenance of lean body mass more effectivly when it functions on ketones rather than glucose as its primary fuel source. You can see these studies here, here, here and here. The body can only supply a limited amount of sugar or glucose for fuel. If you talk to runners, marathoners or triathletes, they will tell you that after about 45-90 minutes of continuous endurance exercise the glucose supply runs out and they will experience what is termed a “bonk” (ha Continue reading >>

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