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Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Stones

Celebs Over 40 Are Obsessed With The Keto Diet. Here’s Everything You Need To Know Before Trying It.

Celebs Over 40 Are Obsessed With The Keto Diet. Here’s Everything You Need To Know Before Trying It.

There was once a time when low-fat cookies, chips, and peanut butter were considered “healthy choices.” Oh, how times have changed! Ever since studies began surfacing showing that low-carb, high-fat diets can be more effective for weight loss than low-fat plans, more and more health-conscious folks have fully embraced fat. Sales of whole-fat milk and yogurt have soared in recent years, and most nutritionists now tell their clients to incorporate fatty foods like fish, avocado, and olive oil into their diets. The reemergence of all this creamy goodness has led to a century-old diet making a major comeback: the ketogenic diet. Celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow and Mick Jagger are both rumored to have taken the plan for a test drive. (Got 10 minutes? Then you've got time to lose the weight for good with Prevention's new 10-minute workouts and 10-minute meals. Get Fit in 10: Slim and Strong for Life now!) Those following the keto diet plan eat a lot of fat and just a few carbohydrates. More specifically, 80% of the diet is comprised of fat, 15% is protein, and a mere 5% of calories come from carbohydrates. For someone on a 1,500-calorie diet, that translates to 19 grams of carbohydrates per day, which is less than what you find in a cup of green peas. (For some context, most people’s diets contain 55% carbohydrates, 30% fat, and 15% protein.) The idea is that if you deplete yourself of carbohydrates, the brain’s preferred fuel source, your body will start breaking down fat for energy. When this occurs, the body goes into a state of ketosis. But does this really fuel weight loss or make us healthier? According to one Spanish study of 20 obese adults, the answer is yes. For the study, participants were put on a low-calorie keto diet and lost an average of 40 pound Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Personally, I was wondering if part of the problem might have been PUFA intake. These diets are ketogenic but not paleo and many people think PUFA and grain oils are the healthier fats so the general populace would probably be targeting these kinds of fats. Plus the consumption of mostly muscle meats is likely with little to no emphasis on organ meats. Fruit intake would be nonexistant and veggies are not universally liked. Seems like an easy recipe for a diet that in some cases would be deficient in some important nutrients like magnesium. Of course, then all ketogenic diets are then blamed as dangerous when it could be simply an issue of imbalance and lack of certain nutrients, probably those that co occur with carbs but would exist in higher quantities in the less favored types of meat like grassfed or organ meats. Since neither the innuit nor the masai have a big problem with kidney stones, then it's probably not the ketogenic diet itself that is the problem. I think the scientists are missing the important point of all the clues they have been given about what may cause kidney stones. They are assuming it is the ketogenic diet itself but not looking beyond that to reasons why it may not be. IMO, what they should be looking for is what is diff about the diets of these kidney stone patients compared to other ketogenic diets that do not result in kidney stones. "...what can be done to ameliorate such a risk? In order to ameliorate the risk, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where this treatment was invented, give large amounts of potassium citrate to these children as a preventative measure. The standard dose is 2 mEq/kg per day. This is a very large dose. For a 150 lb adult, it would be nearly 15 grams per day. That's the amount in an entire bottle of over-the-count Continue reading >>

Daily Potassium Citrate Wards Off Kidney Stones In Seizure Patients On High-fat Diet

Daily Potassium Citrate Wards Off Kidney Stones In Seizure Patients On High-fat Diet

Children on the high-fat ketogenic diet to control epileptic seizures can prevent the excruciatingly painful kidney stones that the diet can sometimes cause if they take a daily supplement of potassium citrate the day they start the diet, according to research from Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. A report on the work is published in the August issue of Pediatrics. “We can confidently say this is a safe and powerful way to prevent kidney stones, and it should become part of standard therapy in all ketogenic dieters, not just those who already show elevated urine calcium levels,” says senior investigator Eric Kossoff, M.D., a pediatric neurologist at Hopkins Children’s. “If you wait, it might be too late.” The ketogenic diet, believed to work by initiating biochemical changes that eliminate seizure-triggering short circuits in the brain’s signaling system, is given to many children whose seizures do not respond to medications. But the diet, which consists of high-fat foods with very few carbohydrates, causes a buildup of calcium in the urine and the formation of kidney stones in about 6 percent of those on it. Hopkins Children’s adopted the preventive treatment with potassium citrate two years ago, and doctors now believe this one major side effect of the diet is a thing of the past, allowing more children to remain on the diet for longer. Potassium citrate taken twice daily, either as powder sprinkled on food or dissolved in water, is believed to inhibit stone formation. In their study of 301 children treated for epilepsy with the ketogenic diet at Hopkins Children’s the researchers found that those who got potassium citrate twice daily were seven times less likely to develop kidney stones — one of 106 (0.9 percent) developed a kidney stone compared Continue reading >>

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Protein, Ketones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones may not be on your mind when beginning a weight-loss diet, but if you plan to follow a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet plan, they should be. While many popular low-carb commercial diet plans encourage your body to shift into a fat-burning state called ketosis, the production of ketones that results can alter your urine chemistry and raise the risk of kidney stones. Understanding the risks to your kidneys can help you decide whether the weight loss promises of a high-protein, low-carb diet are worth it. Video of the Day Kidney stones develop when a hard mass of crystals develops in the urinary tract. Kidney stones are often extremely painful, especially when they pass through the thin ureter to exit the body. There are a few different types of kidney stones, each made up of different materials. The cause of kidney stones remains unknown, but some people seem to be more prone to developing them than others, so there may be a hereditary component. Ketones are compounds formed by the breakdown of fat as the body shifts from burning carbohydrates to burning fat for fuel. During a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet, ketones become the main source of energy in the body. After a few days or weeks on this type of diet, the brain begins to use ketones as fuel instead of glucose. However, when too many ketones build up in the bloodstream, the pH of the urine changes from neutral to slightly acidic, which can put stress on the kidneys and potentially raise the risk of developing kidney stones. A 2002 study published in the "American Journal of Kidney Diseases" found that a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet raised the acidity of the blood over a six-week period, a condition known to contribute to kidney stones. The study found up to a 90-percent increase in acid Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

The use of exogenous ketones is a new and novel technology. So the safety profile of a ketone supplement like KETO//OS begins to emerge as more research is being done. Often people are concerned about kidney or liver health when it comes to exogenous ketones. What the studies are actually finding, is that ketones, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is actually beneficial to the health of our liver and kidneys. There are also many other benefits of taking ketones as well. The risk of kidney stones can be a concern, as we know there is a small risk from a ketogenic diet standpoint. However, potassium supplementation decreases that risk of getting kidney stones substantially. Exogenous ketone and potassium supplementation while following a ketogenic diet, is an effective combination. To learn more about, and order exogenous ketones, go to the Prüvit online store. Continue reading >>

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

Today we officially kickoff this brand new podcast dedicated to answering listeners questions about the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet. It’s called Keto Talk with Jimmy Moore & The Doc (now available to listen and subscribe on iTunes) featuring 10-year veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles.” These two are a keto power pair ready to take on your most pressing questions about this way of eating. KEY QUOTE: “If you cheat on your ketogenic diet, then you are at risk of a kidney stone or gout. The point is if you’re gonna cheat, you’re gonna pay for it.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 1: – The beginning of this new podcast devoted to keto – How Adam uses ketogenic diets with his patients – Adam’s father who died early from diabetes issues – Follow Jimmy and Adam on Periscope – Whether keto creates or prevents kidney stones – Why it’s not a good idea to cheat on your low-carb diet – How cheating, not keto, is what leads to gout – Whether a ketogenic diet causes heart palpitations – How to best balance your electrolytes starting keto – The problem with caffeine on your cortisol levels WORLD’S 1ST REUSABLE BREATH KETONE ANALYZER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipTHE WORLD’S FIRST EXOGENOUS KETONES SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipLINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 1 – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Get the 2015 Ketonix breath ketone analyzer from Ketonix.com – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Try the KETO//OS exogenous ketones supplement – Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” – Dr. Adam Nally, DO from DocMuscles.com – Jimmy Moore on Periscope Continue reading >>

12 Steps To Prevent Kidney Stones

12 Steps To Prevent Kidney Stones

12 Steps to Prevent Kidney Stones: The pain of kidney stones is one of the worst possible pains one could possibly experience. While the causes behind kidney stones are not fully understood there is some common nutritional advice that can help prevent these stones from forming. Kidney stones come in a number of different forms. Understanding the type of stone is key to preventing it from re-forming. The most common kidney stones are by far calcium oxalate crystals which account for 80% and uric acid crystals which account for another 5-10% (1). The goal of this article is to help you find the best strategies to work with your unique genetic makeup to prevent kidney stones. We will discover the underlying mechanisms behind kidney stone formation and the unique nutrition and lifestyle tips to follow. Fructose and Kidney Stone Formation: Certain foods that are commonly consumed in the United States promote kidney stone formation. High fructose consumption is linked with an increased excretion of calcium, oxalates and uric acid, which are all associated with increased risk of kidney stones. Research has shown that high fructose diets are at greater risk for kidney stone formation (2, 3, 4) Soft drinks with phosphoric acid significantly increase calcium excretion and kidney stone formation (5). Soft drinks and sweet teas are perhaps the biggest dietary causes of kidney stone formation because they often contain high levels of both fructose and phosphoric acid (6) Major Factors With Kidney Stones: Here are 6 major factors often seen with kidney stone formation Dehydration: This causes low urine volume and less fluid to grab up calcium and other compounds in the urinary system. This is the easiest thing to address. You should be urinating every 1-2 waking hours and unless you Continue reading >>

Kidney Stones, Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, And The Ketogenic Diet

Kidney Stones, Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, And The Ketogenic Diet

Abstract Summary: Purpose: Because carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the ketogenic diet are each known risk factors for kidney stones, simultaneous use of these therapies has been discouraged. The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in children in this combination-therapy population. Methods: Since 1996, 301 children have been started on the ketogenic diet at our institution. A retrospective cohort study of renal calculi in ketogenic diet patients was performed to evaluate the increased risk with combined use of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Results: In 15 (6.7%) of 221 children on the ketogenic diet without the use of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, stones developed. In five (6.3%) of the 80 children on the diet in combination with topiramate or zonisamide, stones developed. There was no difference between these two groups (p = 0.82). No child was treated with either acetazolamide or more than one carbonic anhydrase inhibitor simultaneously. Prior ketogenic diet duration was shorter (10.4 vs. 22.4 months; p = 0.03), and more children had either a family history of renal stones or significant urologic abnormalities (80 vs. 27%; p = 0.04) in the combination-therapy group. Conclusions: The combined use of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the ketogenic diet does not increase the risk of kidney stones. We recommend that all patients treated with combination therapy should be treated with increased hydration. Urine alkalinization should be considered for children with previous renal abnormalities, family histories of kidney stones, hematuria, or elevated urine calcium-to-creatinine ratios. If renal stones are found, we advocate discontinuation of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. The use of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in the treatme Continue reading >>

Kidney Stones

Kidney Stones

Introduction Kidney stones are a painful disorder of the urinary tract, affecting about 10% of Americans. Stones occur two times more often in men than in women. The pain of having a stone has been compared to that of childbirth. The stones grow slowly over several months or years and are made of hard deposits of various minerals, including calcium, uric acid, and oxalate. Signs and Symptoms Asymptomatic stones may be found by an x-ray for an unrelated condition. Or you may have symptoms such as: Sudden onset of excruciating pain in the buttocks area Abdominal pain Nausea and vomiting Constant movement to relieve the pain Pain in the genital area as the stone moves Fever and chills Increased age Obesity What Causes It? People develop kidney stones because: Their small bowel absorbs too much calcium Their diets are too high in calcium or another mineral They have intestinal problems Urinary tract infections They may have inherited a certain disorder that makes their bodies more likely to form kidney stones Other factors that increase the risk of kidney stones include: Not drinking enough fluids (especially in the summer) Not exercising enough, or a sedentary lifestyle Hypertension, which makes people nearly 3 times more likely to develop kidney stones Stress Poor dietary habits Metabolic syndrome Obesity Family history of kidney stones Continual exposure to high temperatures, which makes people nearly 8 times more likely to form kidney stones Other medical conditions, such as gout, chronic diarrhea, certain cancers, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) What to Expect at Your Doctor's Office If you are in extreme pain, your health care provider may give you a strong pain reliever. Your provider will need a urine sample to check for infection and to see if your urine is ac Continue reading >>

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Will Keto//os Cause Or Aggravate Kidney Stones?

Kidney stones are a known potential side effect of the ketogenic diet. Exogenous ketone supplements are a novel technology, so it is currently unknown if it could cause a similar problem, but it is possible. Clinically, potassium citrate is used to help decrease the risk of kidney stones (See here: including those that occur with the ketogenic diet. Potassium citrate is available commercially; however, as always, consumers should consult with their physicians before taking any supplements. Continue reading >>

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. These programs generally recommend that dieters get 30% to 50% of their total calories from protein. By comparison, the American Heart Association, the National Cholesterol Education Program, and the American Cancer Society all recommend a diet in which a smaller percentage of calories come from protein. Normally your body burns carbohydrates for fuel. When you drastically cut carbs, the body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, and it begins to burn its own fat for fuel. When your fat stores become a primary energy source, you may lose weight. Some experts have raised concern about high-protein, low-carb diets. High cholesterol.Some protein sources -- like fatty cuts of meat, whole dairy products, and other high-fat foods -- can raise cholesterol, increasing your chance of heart disease. However, studies showed that people on the Atkins diet for up to 2 years actually had decreased “bad” cholesterol levels. Kidney problems. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys. This could worsen kidney function. Osteoporosis and kidney stones. When you're on a high-protein diet, you may urinate more calcium than normal. There are conflicting reports, but some experts think this could make osteoporosis and kidney stones more likely. If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables, and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. Continue reading >>

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

What’s it all about? Is it good for you? Is it bad for you? What’s it like? How do I ‘do’ ketosis? How do I know I’m in ketosis? The questions everyone who’s Banting wants the answers to. Ketosis, in chef speak, is quite simply a state your body enters once it has been deprived of glucose. Your body switches to burning fat for energy (stored fat or fat that you have eaten) instead of glucose. A side-effect of that process is the release of ketone bodies into the blood stream. When you’re starved of glucose, your body has no choice but to burn fat for fuel, so it needs little explanation as to why ketosis works at melting fat like a blow heater on an ice sculpture. Ketosis comes with some added extras, namely a commonly noted sense of euphoria or lucidity and increased energy levels. A downside includes toothbrush-proof halitosis, which stems from the secretion of ammonia through the lungs as a side effect of burning all that fat. Some people on low-carb diets have reported kidney stones, gallstones and a number of other ailments. Scientific research on both sides of this debate is being done all the time, but in our experience from talking to the members of our community and tracking their data, it is generally a case of what was done before they started Banting and not Banting itself. But, this post isn’t here to debate that, it serves as a ‘how to’ and not as a ‘you should’. Eat more buttery or creamy sauce on your steak and eat less steak. Your body can convert protein into glucose so too much meat will hinder your progress. What doIdo? Theoretically it is very easy. Avoid anything with high carbs in it. If you’re not sure what those might be, consult the Real Meal Revolution ‘Red List’. Even dipping your toe into the red list will ruin Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are a frequent occurrence on the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. [1, 2, 3] About 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones per year, compared with one in several thousand among the general population. [4] On children who follow the ketogenic diet for six years, the incidence of kidney stones is about 25% [5]. A 100-fold odds ratio is hardly ever seen in medicine. There must be some fundamental cause of kidney stones that is dramatically promoted by clinical ketogenic diets. Just over half of ketogenic diet kidney stones are composed of uric acid and just under half of calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid. Among the general public, about 85% of stones are calcium oxalate mixes and about 10% are uric acid. So, roughly speaking, uric acid kidney stones are 500-fold more frequent on the ketogenic diet and calcium oxalate stones are 50-fold more frequent. Causes are Poorly Understood In the nephrology literature, kidney stones are a rather mysterious condition. Wikipedia has a summary of the reasons offered in the literature for high stone formation on the ketogenic diet [4]: Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons: Excess calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria) occurs due to increased bone demineralisation with acidosis. Bones are mainly composed of calcium phosphate. The phosphate reacts with the acid, and the calcium is excreted by the kidneys. Hypocitraturia: the urine has an abnormally low concentration of citrate, which normally helps to dissolve free calcium. The urine has a low pH, which stops uric acid from dissolving, leading to crystals that act as a nidus for calcium stone formation. Many institutions traditionally restricted the water intake of patients on the diet to Continue reading >>

Does Protein Make Kidney Stones

Does Protein Make Kidney Stones

Does Protein Make Kidney Stones - Does soda drinking kidney stones? - kidneystoners.org, Kidney stone formers often ask us whether their soda drinking caused their kidney stones. many have already taken the initiative to cut out all their soda, thinking. Kidney stones - national kidney foundation, How common are kidney stones? each year, more than half a million people go to emergency rooms for kidney stone problems. it is estimated that one in ten people will. Kidney stones: , symptoms, treatment, Kidney stones are clumps of mineral that accumulate from dissolved materials on the inner lining of the kidneys. some can become as big as golf balls.. Natural home remedies kidney stones pain: treatment, Kidney stones are hard masses in the kidneys and bladder and are made up of tiny minerals that crystallize in the kidneys. read more for causes, symptoms & remedies. Kidney stones - symptoms - mayo clinic, Kidney stones — comprehensive overview covers symptoms, risks, causes, treatment of this often intensely painful condition.. How kidneys work - national kidney foundation, Did you know that african americans are 3 times more likely to experience kidney failure? because kidney disease often has no symptoms, it can go unnoticed until it. Kidney stones | urology indiana, Kidney stones. many factors can contribute to your chance of having a kidney stone, including diet and fluid intake, where you live, or even your work environment.. Nutrition | healthfully, The liver is an essential organ in food digestion and metabolism. it is also responsible for cleaning the blood and storing nutrients until. Kidney stones – treatment options orange county, Contact us at (714) 639-1915 to make an appointment to discuss treatment and prevention of kidney stones.. Does soda drinking caus Continue reading >>

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