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Does Ketosis Cause Ketoacidosis

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What Is Ketoacidosis? A Comprehensive Guide

Ketoacidosis is lethal. It is responsible for over 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the US with a mortality rate of around 5%. In other words, ketoacidosis is to blame for about 5,000 deaths per year. The cause? A deadly combination of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased ketone body levels in the blood (more on this deadly combination later). Luckily, this lethal triad rarely affects individuals who don’t have diabetes. However, the majority (80%) of cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with a known history of diabetes mellitus (any form of diabetes). Ketoacidosis vs. Diabetic Ketoacidosis — What’s The Difference? At this point, you may have noticed that I used ketoacidosis and diabetic ketoacidosis interchangeably. This is because it is difficult for the body to get into a state of ketoacidosis without the blood sugar control issues that are common in people with diabetes. Hence, the term diabetic ketoacidosis. (However, there is another form of ketoacidosis called alcoholic ketoacidosis. This occurs in alcoholics who had a recent alcohol binge during a period of time when they didn’t eat enough.) Ketoacidosis tends to occur the m Continue reading >>

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  1. smaug6

    So, as I have been reading more and more about Ketogenic diets, the topic of Ketoacidosis repeatedly comes up. From what I understand, a prolonged Ketogenic diet would eventually lead to Ketoacidosis. Obviously, this is not the case as people have been doing Keto for extended periods of time and do not exhibit any of the harmful effects associated with Ketoacidosis. Does anyone have any good sources explaining this?

  2. lowcarbbq

    can you link to any credible sources that say benign dietary ketosis would eventually lead to ketoacidosis?

  3. smaug6

    Here is an article documenting this in a woman on Keto diet for 4+ years. It was published by the New England Journal of Medicine.
    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc052709
    It mentions that the woman may have had a pre-disposition to ketoacidosis. However, the pathways it mentions for ketoacidosis to occur suggest that it would be more likely in a starvation diet. It did not indicate that the woman was engaged in a low calorie keto diet.
    Another article documenting a similar case, but with the subject on the diet for approximately 3 weeks.
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/1752-1947-2-45#page-1

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