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Does Ketosis Cause Hot Flashes

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Hormone Changes

Ketosis And Hormone Changes

While working as a nurse with Dr. Robert Atkins, I adopted a low carb diet. My goal was to avoid my genetic tendency for developing obesity and type 2 diabetes. I had the tools at hand to monitor urinary and breath ketones frequently. After months I noticed that a few days before my period, ketones would drop or even disappear. This coincided with mild PMS symptoms including weight gain and the re-emergence of hunger and cravings. Ketones would return by the 2nd day or so of my menses. I began to mention this to my patients who wanted to monitor urinary ketones. I didn’t want them getting discouraged if they experienced the same. Many would return and tell me they noticed the drop in ketones as well. They appreciated having advanced warning. We also observed that with low-carb regimen, PMS symptoms over time would decrease, sometimes to the point that a woman would be surprised when she began her flow. At the start of the plan others would mention that the first period would in some way be worse before getting better. To my knowledge this has not been studied. What I learned is that any hormone changes in women can increase insulin resistance, which makes the body produce more insulin to get the same insulin benefit. At puberty and menarche when girls need to gain body fat they become more insulin resistant. I have been a carb addict but my cravings increased significantly at this time as did my weight. Hormones also fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, peri-menopause, and menopause there are significant hormone changes accompanied by increased insulin resistance. This change of life stage (peri-menopause) for me was difficult. I lost ketones but still gained weight on my maintenance plan (my strategy was to adopt a 20 gram carbohydrate level and st Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: What It Is And How To Beat It

Keto Flu: What It Is And How To Beat It

You may have heard of the keto flu – you may even have experienced it! But for anyone who is, for the first time, transitioning to a low-carb, high-fat diet, the keto flu can hit you pretty hard. And if you don’t know what’s happening it can easily knock you off your stride. For me, the keto flu lasted for about 3 weeks. I think this is actually longer than most people experience it – the average is about 1 week. I was a total carb addict before hand though so that could explain it! The keto flu is also known as the low carb flu, and although there are plenty of lucky people that barely notice it, for others it can really feel like you have genuinely got the flu. For a few days you are miserable and want nothing more than to lie on the sofa with a blanket and Netflix. With symptoms such as: brain fog irritability headaches lethargy body aches anxiety a general feeling of ‘unwellness’ I mostly experienced an overwhelming feeling of exhaustion and lack of motivation to do, well, anything, accompanied by intermittent nausea and hot flushes. What Causes Keto Flu (aka Low Carb Flu)? I haven’t been able to find any actual scientific explanations of what is actually happening during keto flu. Most people believe it is a combination of withdrawal from sugars and carbohydrates plus detoxification symptoms. Marks Sissons from ‘Mark’s Daily Apple’ has this to say: If your body is used to employing easy glucose carbs and now must create glucose from fats and protein (a slightly more complex but entirely natural mode of operation), it can take some time to get up to speed. Rest assured that our bodies can and are doing the job. It simply takes time to work efficiently. The transition actually shifts metabolic related gene expression, increasing fat oxidation path Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Menopause can be very difficult on a number of levels. Although each woman's experience is different, many find that they gain fat, lose muscle tone, and struggle with hot flashes, insomnia, and mood swings during this time. In this article, I'll discuss how a low-carb or keto diet combined with other lifestyle strategies may help you manage some of the physical, mental, and emotional symptoms of menopause. What is the Menopause Transition? Although a woman technically reaches menopause when she has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, symptoms related to perimenopause – the time where hormonal changes begin - can start much earlier. In addition, they may last for several years after this point, and new symptoms may develop within the first few years after menopause. The average age of onset for perimenopause is 46, and it typically lasts about 7 years. However, a woman may start perimenopause anytime between her mid-30s and mid-50s, and the transition can last from 4 to 14 years (1). The day after a woman has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, she is considered postmenopausal. During and after the menopause transition, as many as 34 symptoms may occur. The most common ones include: Hot flashes and night sweats Weight gain, especially around the middle Insomnia Vaginal dryness Mood swings Fatigue Poor memory, ie, “brain fog” Interestingly, while some women find that their symptoms are more severe during perimenopause, others report that their symptoms intensify after they are postmenopausal. Hormone Fluctuations and Insulin Resistance During Menopause During a woman's reproductive years, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes the release of an egg from one of her ovaries approximately every 28 days and stimulates ovarian production of estrogen. Af Continue reading >>

Keto Diet: 10 Benefits (& Potential Drawbacks)

Keto Diet: 10 Benefits (& Potential Drawbacks)

Now on to Keto diets. Keto diets work. Even among patients initially doubtful, once they get into ketosis and see impressive, gratifying, often times instant results, they become believers. If you didn’t read my previous blog on the significant health benefits of an alkaline diet, please consider reviewing that here. And after you learn more about the health effects of a keto diet (in this blog), my next blog will talk about the power of combining the two in my Keto-Alkaline™ Diet. You can also download my brand new, FREE, ebook on Keto-Alkaline principles entitled, “The Secret Science of Staying Slim, Sane and Sexy After 40” here, as well! Experts have used keto diets since the 1920s for epilepsy, beginning in the 1960’s for obesity, and over the last decade for numerous conditions including diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), acne, neurological diseases, cancer, respiratory disease, and cardiovascular disease.[1] Keto diets can address numerous health conditions During her initial consult, my 47-year-old patient Margaret expressed concern about several of these issues. She had done several commercial diets over the past decade with varying results. She’s not alone, right? None had remedied her polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and her doctor remained baffled about how to treat it. Acne, a history of depression, familial Type 2 diabetes, and about 40 extra pounds accompanied those frustrations. While getting to a point where she felt happy took about a month, a keto diet became Margaret’s remedy. She reversed PCOS, her acne cleared up, she had more steady moods, and the scales started moving in her favor. She’s not alone. In my practice, I’ve witnessed how keto diets can benefit numerous conditions, including these 10: Weight loss. When patien Continue reading >>

How To Identify Ketosis

How To Identify Ketosis

Expert Reviewed Ketosis is a normal metabolic process by which your body breaks down stored fat for energy, which can also result in a dangerous buildup of ketones in the body called ketoacidosis.[1] Ketosis is often the product of a low-carbohydrate diet that people use to lose weight and gain muscle or it can also be a product of malnutrition. Although the long-term risks of ketosis are not clear, there is some evidence that it can increase your risk of heart disease and certain cancers.[2] By recognizing the signs of ketosis, you can help minimize your risk for developing ketoacidosis.[3] Continue reading >>

Menopause Sucks! Even On A Paleo Diet

Menopause Sucks! Even On A Paleo Diet

I’ve been hesitating to post about this topic again, and more specifically about me personally and menopause. I’m officially post menopause. No menstrual cycle for 2 years now, or is it 3? Somehow it’s a far more defining landmark in my life that turning 40, and then 50. I didn’t feel any different at those ages than I did at 30. Even now I still feel mid thirties. (I’d say in my 20’s, but due to my immature brain back then the 30’s are more appropriate.) Menopause for me is filled with negative connotations and associations; hair turning grey, jaw line losing it’s definition, bodies sagging and thick around the middle. Butts disappearing and upper arms flapping. Brain power degenerating, and mind and willpower going soft. And I imagine the world looking at us menopausal women and judging us as past our prime, no longer vibrant and attractive, less able, less dynamic, less smart. These changes marking the start of the long slow decline into old age and retirement. Menopause is a turning point. My body is no longer fertile, hormone levels that keep us young and healthy decline dramatically with uncomfortable physical, psychological and cognitive consequences. Estrogen, progesterone and testosterone levels in my body are now barely measurable. Everything I considered normal about myself has changed. While going through menopause, for a while I thought I’d lost my mind, I forgot where I put everything. When studying for exams, I couldn’t remember as easily as I used to be able to, it took so much more effort. When writing assignments, I struggled to keep a lot of ideas in my mind the way I could in the past. Hot flushes which started out as “wow this is interesting” have become a tedious regular intrusion. Triggered by the smallest things – a smal Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes No More!

Hot Flashes No More!

Deb posted this comment in response to the Smarter, Faster, Better post describing the transformations in her brother’s life and her own health minus wheat: After watching my 52-year-old brother drop 53 pounds in 6 months, I knew he was onto something BIG! For years he had experienced severe digestive issues, was turning into a recluse, he complained constantly about aches and pains, and he was depressed. A friend turned him onto Wheat Belly and it changed his life. Thank you for giving me my brother back! After eliminating wheat, he no longer has any digestive-colitis issues, his depression is gone (without medications) and the weight is flying off. He also never feels hunger and feels completely satisfied by the amount of food he eats each day. He is dedicated to losing another 90 pounds. I truly believe this goal is in sight. His doctor is overjoyed with his results. As I watched this happen, I thought, why not do this myself? After struggling with 30 extra pounds for years–taking it off, putting it back on, excessive exercise routines, Weight Watchers, reduced caloric intake–nothing ever stuck. I eliminated wheat 4 weeks ago and the changes have been dramatic: My thinking has cleared, my aches and pains are gone (thought I had arthritis – no), my sudden outbursts are gone, and much to my husband’s surprise (after 25 years of marriage) I have libido (not sure I ever had it to begin with, poor guy). However, the absolute best thing that happened: my debilitating hot flashes are gone! I struggled most of my life as a hot person, but after menopause I was having severe hot flashes, soaking wet, at least 10 times an hour. When my doctor suggested HRT [hormone replacement therapy], I went along with her, as I was not living. When she said my time was up on HRT, Continue reading >>

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Ooh, ooh, ooh, I feel my temperature rising Help me, I’m flaming I must be a hundred and nine Burning, burning, burning And nothing can cool me I just might turn into smoke But I feel fine –Elvis Presley singing “Burning Love” Somebody’s turned up the heat up in here and it’s gotta be that low-carb diet I’m on, right? That’s what everybody does with livin’ la vida low-carb when something new happens to them after starting this way of eating–they blame it on low-carb! I mocked this notion in this blog post about an earache a couple of years ago, but what if there is merit to some rather strange side effects of following a controlled-carbohydrate nutritional approach? Hmmmmmm. There are several things we KNOW will happen to most people when they begin the low-carb lifestyle: their HDL “good” cholesterol goes up, there is a marked improvement in mental health, for women it helps with reproductive health, blood sugar levels are stabilized, they end up having less acne, triglycerides plummet (a VERY good thing!), and so much more I could spend hours sharing with you about. But there are some things that can vary from person to person as one of my readers shared with me in a recent e-mail. This 43-year old man starting cutting his carbohydrate intake beginning in January 2008 and has lost over 25 pounds so far. WOO HOO! He has really enjoyed this new low-carb lifestyle change, but was curious about an unexpected side effect that has been plaguing him with no apparent cause. Here’s what he wrote: Hey Jimmy, After lots of searches, I’m having trouble finding out if anyone experiences a sensation of a rise in body temperature while in ketosis. There are some days I feel like I am literally burning up (but I don’t have a fever or anything). Coinciden Continue reading >>

Fat Fast And Menopause

Fat Fast And Menopause

All my life I have struggled with my weight. Both sides of my family suffered from morbid obesity, along with metabolic syndrome, a preoccupation with food and emotional eating. Only when I reached puberty and began to individuate, did I realize that it was not written in stone that I had to be overweight like everyone else. I could change my dietary habits and maintain my body weight within a healthful range. I did this most successfully by restricting my intake of carbohydrate. This strategy worked until menopause, when something shifted. In the past, when my weight crept up, I would eat more protein and less carbs, and the excess pounds would disappear. After menopause, this method was no longer effective. My weight began to climb, my clothes grew tighter and I felt frustrated that my sincere efforts yielded so little success. My metabolism had changed, and eating more protein and restricting carbohydrate did not result in weight loss as it had in the past. I needed to restrict my intake of protein as well. I have altered the composition of my diet so that the majority of my calories now come from healthy fats, along with moderate protein and very low carbohydrate intake. This translates into approximately 70% of my calories from fat, 20% from protein and 10% from carbs. This is the prescription for a ketogenic diet, and at 56, it is the only way I can eat without gaining weight. I feel well when I eat this way, with steady energy, no fluid retention and sound sleep. My esteemed colleague, Georgia Ede, MD author of the blog Diagnosis Diet, described in her most recent post, how well she also feels since committing to a ketogenic diet. There is increasing scientific evidence to support the benefits of a ketogenic diet, including normalization of blood sugar and other Continue reading >>

Q&a: Is Paleo Good For Menopausal Women?

Q&a: Is Paleo Good For Menopausal Women?

Here’s an interesting question from a reader that I thought a lot of people might be able to relate to… Q: My midwife is interested in Paleo. She says she feels like Paleo is more for the 18 to 40 crossfit crowd than for her… She is nearly 50 though and she is curious if there is anything to do or not do specifically for hormone changes. Do you have any thoughts? A: I think it sucks that Paleo has become so intertwined with the CrossFit scene that a 50 year-old woman doesn’t think it would be good for her. People of all ages, including babies, children, adults, and the elderly, can and do benefit from eating Paleo. Paleo is a diet to reduce inflammation – not just get people ripped – and 50 year-old women often have all kinds of inflammation, whether it be in their joints, their arteries, their digestive tracts, or their sinuses. The diet is also awesome for so many reasons for people who have hormonal imbalances, like women on the brink of menopause or in the throes of it. Hot flashes, weight gain, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms aren’t actually a normal part of getting older. They’re a product of life-long hormonal imbalances, very much brought on by eating neolithic foods like grains, dairy, and sugar. Here’s an interesting article on menopause that compares Western women to women from more primitive cultures. So, how, exactly, will the Paleo diet potentially affect women in their pre/peri/menopausal years? Blood Sugar First, eating sugar and refined grains can really throw off your blood sugar, and blood sugar can severely affect how well your hormonal systems are working. If one hormonal system is off, like your adrenals or thyroid, then often your sex hormones get out of whack, too. Dairy Dairy can seriously affect sex hormone balance Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Weight Loss And Hot Flashes

The Connection Between Weight Loss And Hot Flashes

If you've had one, there's no mistaking it: the sudden, intense, hot feeling in your upper body, perhaps accompanied by a rapid heartbeat, sweating, dizziness, nausea or headache. The initial rush is followed by a warm flush, leaving you red and sweaty. Up to 85 percent of women in the United States experience hot flashes of some kind as they approach menopause and for the first year or two after their periods stop. Between 20 and 50 percent of women continue to have them for many years after as well. But, to the delight of women everywhere, research focused on alleviating these troublesome symptoms is growing. The Link Between Weight and Hot Flashes Studies have found that obese and overweight women, in general, report more severe and more frequent hot flash symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. Hot flashes are mostly caused by the hormonal changes of menopause, but can also be affected by lifestyle and medications. A diminished level of estrogen (seen during menopause) has a direct effect on the hypothalamus, the part of the brain responsible for controlling your body temperature (as well as appetite, sleep cycles and sex hormones). By some physiological mechanism, the drop in estrogen confuses the hypothalamus - which has been called the body's "thermostat" - making it read "too hot." In a recent study, 40 overweight or obese women who were experiencing four or more hot flashes a day were randomized to either behavioral weight loss intervention or a wait-list control. Using physiologic monitoring, a diary and questionnaire, hot flashes were assessed before and after the intervention. The results? Women who were randomized to the intensive intervention reported a significantly greater improvement in hot flashes compared Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

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