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Does Ketosis Cause Hot Flashes

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Menopause can be very difficult on a number of levels. Although each woman's experience is different, many find that they gain fat, lose muscle tone, and struggle with hot flashes, insomnia, and mood swings during this time. In this article, I'll discuss how a low-carb or keto diet combined with other lifestyle strategies may help you manage some of the physical, mental, and emotional symptoms of menopause. What is the Menopause Transition? Although a woman technically reaches menopause when she has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, symptoms related to perimenopause – the time where hormonal changes begin - can start much earlier. In addition, they may last for several years after this point, and new symptoms may develop within the first few years after menopause. The average age of onset for perimenopause is 46, and it typically lasts about 7 years. However, a woman may start perimenopause anytime between her mid-30s and mid-50s, and the transition can last from 4 to 14 years (1). The day after a woman has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, she is considered postmenopausal. During and after the menopause transition, as many as 34 symptoms may occur. The most common ones include: Hot flashes and night sweats Weight gain, especially around the middle Insomnia Vaginal dryness Mood swings Fatigue Poor memory, ie, “brain fog” Interestingly, while some women find that their symptoms are more severe during perimenopause, others report that their symptoms intensify after they are postmenopausal. Hormone Fluctuations and Insulin Resistance During Menopause During a woman's reproductive years, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes the release of an egg from one of her ovaries approximately every 28 days and stimulates ovarian production of estrogen. Af Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: What It Is And How To Beat It

Keto Flu: What It Is And How To Beat It

You may have heard of the keto flu – you may even have experienced it! But for anyone who is, for the first time, transitioning to a low-carb, high-fat diet, the keto flu can hit you pretty hard. And if you don’t know what’s happening it can easily knock you off your stride. For me, the keto flu lasted for about 3 weeks. I think this is actually longer than most people experience it – the average is about 1 week. I was a total carb addict before hand though so that could explain it! The keto flu is also known as the low carb flu, and although there are plenty of lucky people that barely notice it, for others it can really feel like you have genuinely got the flu. For a few days you are miserable and want nothing more than to lie on the sofa with a blanket and Netflix. With symptoms such as: brain fog irritability headaches lethargy body aches anxiety a general feeling of ‘unwellness’ I mostly experienced an overwhelming feeling of exhaustion and lack of motivation to do, well, anything, accompanied by intermittent nausea and hot flushes. What Causes Keto Flu (aka Low Carb Flu)? I haven’t been able to find any actual scientific explanations of what is actually happening during keto flu. Most people believe it is a combination of withdrawal from sugars and carbohydrates plus detoxification symptoms. Marks Sissons from ‘Mark’s Daily Apple’ has this to say: If your body is used to employing easy glucose carbs and now must create glucose from fats and protein (a slightly more complex but entirely natural mode of operation), it can take some time to get up to speed. Rest assured that our bodies can and are doing the job. It simply takes time to work efficiently. The transition actually shifts metabolic related gene expression, increasing fat oxidation path Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes No More!

Hot Flashes No More!

Deb posted this comment in response to the Smarter, Faster, Better post describing the transformations in her brother’s life and her own health minus wheat: After watching my 52-year-old brother drop 53 pounds in 6 months, I knew he was onto something BIG! For years he had experienced severe digestive issues, was turning into a recluse, he complained constantly about aches and pains, and he was depressed. A friend turned him onto Wheat Belly and it changed his life. Thank you for giving me my brother back! After eliminating wheat, he no longer has any digestive-colitis issues, his depression is gone (without medications) and the weight is flying off. He also never feels hunger and feels completely satisfied by the amount of food he eats each day. He is dedicated to losing another 90 pounds. I truly believe this goal is in sight. His doctor is overjoyed with his results. As I watched this happen, I thought, why not do this myself? After struggling with 30 extra pounds for years–taking it off, putting it back on, excessive exercise routines, Weight Watchers, reduced caloric intake–nothing ever stuck. I eliminated wheat 4 weeks ago and the changes have been dramatic: My thinking has cleared, my aches and pains are gone (thought I had arthritis – no), my sudden outbursts are gone, and much to my husband’s surprise (after 25 years of marriage) I have libido (not sure I ever had it to begin with, poor guy). However, the absolute best thing that happened: my debilitating hot flashes are gone! I struggled most of my life as a hot person, but after menopause I was having severe hot flashes, soaking wet, at least 10 times an hour. When my doctor suggested HRT [hormone replacement therapy], I went along with her, as I was not living. When she said my time was up on HRT, Continue reading >>

Menopause Sucks! Even On A Paleo Diet

Menopause Sucks! Even On A Paleo Diet

I’ve been hesitating to post about this topic again, and more specifically about me personally and menopause. I’m officially post menopause. No menstrual cycle for 2 years now, or is it 3? Somehow it’s a far more defining landmark in my life that turning 40, and then 50. I didn’t feel any different at those ages than I did at 30. Even now I still feel mid thirties. (I’d say in my 20’s, but due to my immature brain back then the 30’s are more appropriate.) Menopause for me is filled with negative connotations and associations; hair turning grey, jaw line losing it’s definition, bodies sagging and thick around the middle. Butts disappearing and upper arms flapping. Brain power degenerating, and mind and willpower going soft. And I imagine the world looking at us menopausal women and judging us as past our prime, no longer vibrant and attractive, less able, less dynamic, less smart. These changes marking the start of the long slow decline into old age and retirement. Menopause is a turning point. My body is no longer fertile, hormone levels that keep us young and healthy decline dramatically with uncomfortable physical, psychological and cognitive consequences. Estrogen, progesterone and testosterone levels in my body are now barely measurable. Everything I considered normal about myself has changed. While going through menopause, for a while I thought I’d lost my mind, I forgot where I put everything. When studying for exams, I couldn’t remember as easily as I used to be able to, it took so much more effort. When writing assignments, I struggled to keep a lot of ideas in my mind the way I could in the past. Hot flushes which started out as “wow this is interesting” have become a tedious regular intrusion. Triggered by the smallest things – a smal Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Ooh, ooh, ooh, I feel my temperature rising Help me, I’m flaming I must be a hundred and nine Burning, burning, burning And nothing can cool me I just might turn into smoke But I feel fine –Elvis Presley singing “Burning Love” Somebody’s turned up the heat up in here and it’s gotta be that low-carb diet I’m on, right? That’s what everybody does with livin’ la vida low-carb when something new happens to them after starting this way of eating–they blame it on low-carb! I mocked this notion in this blog post about an earache a couple of years ago, but what if there is merit to some rather strange side effects of following a controlled-carbohydrate nutritional approach? Hmmmmmm. There are several things we KNOW will happen to most people when they begin the low-carb lifestyle: their HDL “good” cholesterol goes up, there is a marked improvement in mental health, for women it helps with reproductive health, blood sugar levels are stabilized, they end up having less acne, triglycerides plummet (a VERY good thing!), and so much more I could spend hours sharing with you about. But there are some things that can vary from person to person as one of my readers shared with me in a recent e-mail. This 43-year old man starting cutting his carbohydrate intake beginning in January 2008 and has lost over 25 pounds so far. WOO HOO! He has really enjoyed this new low-carb lifestyle change, but was curious about an unexpected side effect that has been plaguing him with no apparent cause. Here’s what he wrote: Hey Jimmy, After lots of searches, I’m having trouble finding out if anyone experiences a sensation of a rise in body temperature while in ketosis. There are some days I feel like I am literally burning up (but I don’t have a fever or anything). Coinciden Continue reading >>

Can A Low-carb, No-sugar Diet Cause Night Sweats & Sleepiness?

Can A Low-carb, No-sugar Diet Cause Night Sweats & Sleepiness?

Reducing your carbohydrates allows you to enter the dietary state of ketosis, where you primarily burn fat for energy instead of sugar. This requires you to severely limit your carbohydrate intake and avoid all sugars. Diets of this sort present certain difficulties, including a lack of energy if you typically run on a high-carbohydrate diet. Consult a health care professional before beginning any diet or exercise program. Video of the Day Low-carbohydrate dieting limits your body's ability to use glycogen for energy. The more you restrict your carbohydrates, and the more you are physically active, the quicker you will experience a loss of energy. Over time, your body becomes more accustomed to running primarily on ketones, free-floating fatty acids, instead of sugar, but it takes a while to adapt to this. If you are following the Atkins diet or a similar variation, this is usually dealt with during a two-week period known as the induction phase. Sleepiness can be the direct result of a lack of energy. Even though you are dieting, if you cut your calories too far, you may be suffering from a lack of total energy to work with. Regardless of the type of diet, excessive caloric restriction can result in both sleeplessness and sleepiness. Until you become accustomed to running on ketones, you may experience sleepiness or euphoria, a dazed feeling, as your body becomes accustomed to having less sugar and more fat to run on. You may sweat more on a low-carbohydrate diet for more than one reason. As your glycogen, or sugar levels deplete, you lose your ability to store water. Each gram of stored glycogen retains 4 g of water. As you must consume as much or more water while dieting than you did before you started your diet, you are going to expel water quickly, and some of this Continue reading >>

Fat Fast And Menopause

Fat Fast And Menopause

All my life I have struggled with my weight. Both sides of my family suffered from morbid obesity, along with metabolic syndrome, a preoccupation with food and emotional eating. Only when I reached puberty and began to individuate, did I realize that it was not written in stone that I had to be overweight like everyone else. I could change my dietary habits and maintain my body weight within a healthful range. I did this most successfully by restricting my intake of carbohydrate. This strategy worked until menopause, when something shifted. In the past, when my weight crept up, I would eat more protein and less carbs, and the excess pounds would disappear. After menopause, this method was no longer effective. My weight began to climb, my clothes grew tighter and I felt frustrated that my sincere efforts yielded so little success. My metabolism had changed, and eating more protein and restricting carbohydrate did not result in weight loss as it had in the past. I needed to restrict my intake of protein as well. I have altered the composition of my diet so that the majority of my calories now come from healthy fats, along with moderate protein and very low carbohydrate intake. This translates into approximately 70% of my calories from fat, 20% from protein and 10% from carbs. This is the prescription for a ketogenic diet, and at 56, it is the only way I can eat without gaining weight. I feel well when I eat this way, with steady energy, no fluid retention and sound sleep. My esteemed colleague, Georgia Ede, MD author of the blog Diagnosis Diet, described in her most recent post, how well she also feels since committing to a ketogenic diet. There is increasing scientific evidence to support the benefits of a ketogenic diet, including normalization of blood sugar and other Continue reading >>

Does Anyone Feel Very Hot Whilst Eating High Fat?

Does Anyone Feel Very Hot Whilst Eating High Fat?

Ive been on the paleo diet for 3 weeks now, i was very hungry for the first couple of weeks but i feel im eating enough fat now and im not really getting hungry between meals. how ever the last few days I have been feeling extremely hot, I don't know if that's a sign of my body adapting to the high fat content or what, I should mention I have been keeping my self very well hydrated. I would say my carbs are very low to what im use to, I have 2 bananas in the morning with a bit of protein straight to the gym a strength workout (mon,wed,fri) or 30 mins at 65-75% HR max followed by core training (tue,thu, I have another protein shake and one banana after taht and then for the rest of the day i'm just eating veg with meals, so not a lot of carbs. Im 6'4" and 230 lbs, I would probably say I'm around 15 % body fat. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 I feel like Im doing a lot, Im not getting stronger in the gym due to the lack of carbs and im feeling very hot for the rest of the day at the moment and quite tired to say the least. Is this normal for someone adapting to the paleo way of eating, is this a sign of me detoxifying or something? my aim is to lose body fat so hence the low carbs, but i feel like im running on empty. Thanks for reading. Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Hormone Changes

Ketosis And Hormone Changes

While working as a nurse with Dr. Robert Atkins, I adopted a low carb diet. My goal was to avoid my genetic tendency for developing obesity and type 2 diabetes. I had the tools at hand to monitor urinary and breath ketones frequently. After months I noticed that a few days before my period, ketones would drop or even disappear. This coincided with mild PMS symptoms including weight gain and the re-emergence of hunger and cravings. Ketones would return by the 2nd day or so of my menses. I began to mention this to my patients who wanted to monitor urinary ketones. I didn’t want them getting discouraged if they experienced the same. Many would return and tell me they noticed the drop in ketones as well. They appreciated having advanced warning. We also observed that with low-carb regimen, PMS symptoms over time would decrease, sometimes to the point that a woman would be surprised when she began her flow. At the start of the plan others would mention that the first period would in some way be worse before getting better. To my knowledge this has not been studied. What I learned is that any hormone changes in women can increase insulin resistance, which makes the body produce more insulin to get the same insulin benefit. At puberty and menarche when girls need to gain body fat they become more insulin resistant. I have been a carb addict but my cravings increased significantly at this time as did my weight. Hormones also fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, peri-menopause, and menopause there are significant hormone changes accompanied by increased insulin resistance. This change of life stage (peri-menopause) for me was difficult. I lost ketones but still gained weight on my maintenance plan (my strategy was to adopt a 20 gram carbohydrate level and st Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes *and* Estrogen Dominance?

Hot Flashes *and* Estrogen Dominance?

Lots of questions have come up in response to my latest video about Estrogen Dominance. First of all, let’s bust a myth that hot flashes mean someone necessarily has overall low estrogen levels. Not true! In fact, research does not generally show a correlation between circulating estrogen levels and the incidence (or severity) of hot flashes. Surprised? Most practitioners are. A hot flash is triggered by the hypothalamus in the brain and occurs to release heat that has built up in the body in response to a surge of norepinephrine and/or epinephrine (catecholamines or “stress hormones” – what we typically call “adrenaline”). In fact, a woman can indeed be estrogen dominant (and even have relatively high levels of estrogen) and still wrestle with hot flashes. It is a sudden drop in estrogen (meaning a higher level of variation) that can trigger the cascade that causes a hot flash. But it’s more complex than than… High cortisol, low cortisol, low progesterone, or low serotonin can all be drivers for hot flashes! This is such a fascinating topic; I could go on and on… Clinical study shows that no hot flash remedy works for everyone (e.g. ) My favorite combination that seems to get excellent results for nearly all late perimenopausal women with persistent (day and night) hot flashes includes 2 Tbsp ground flaxseed daily Black cohosh and Vitex twice daily Caffeine reduction Lower alcohol. Elimination of wine (especially red wine!) Dedicated help with Stress Relief and stress management habits. And if you need more oomph – perhaps maca root powder (This is the key item for some – myself included! Start slowly though (e.g 1/2 tsp). It’s highly stimulatory to some, while others need much more (e.g. 1-2 Tbsp)). Chronic stress often causes HPATG axis imbala Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes In Menopause And How To Alleviate Them?

Hot Flashes In Menopause And How To Alleviate Them?

What are hot flashes during menopause and how long do they lasts? Hot flashes in menopause affect nearly 85 percent of middle-aged women. Unfortunately, the sudden hot flushes do not circumvent young people, which is more noticeable in the past few decades. Mentioned problems can very much impair the quality of life, but do not despair, for the solution do the following. Women who face a very unpleasant symptoms are advised drinks based on medicinal plants. Read on to learn how to relieve hot flashes in menopausal women using hops, sage and red clover. Stay tuned. What you need to know about hot flushes Menopause usually occurs between 45 and 55 years of age after 12-month absence of menstruation. Some of the first symptoms that accompany it are hot flashes and night sweats. These sudden heat waves cause blush and sweat, and rapid heartbeat can also occur. The exact cause of their occurrence is not known even today. The doctors believe that hot flashes in menopause are the result of the expansion of blood vessels due to falling of estrogen levels. The most common symptom of this condition is night sweats in women, which cause nervousness, insomnia and irritability. However, proper nutrition, especially towards the end of the day, can significantly reduce hot flashes at night to improve sleep quality. Factors that increase hot flashes Smoking cigarettes. Caffeine and sipping a large quantity of coffee during the day. Alcoholic beverages. Everyday stress. Elevated blood sugar. Overeating especially late in the evening. Tight shoes and clothing made of synthetic materials. How long do hot flashes in menopause last? Sudden heat waves can last only 30 seconds, and 15-20 minutes as individually. Sometimes they occur only at the beginning of menopause, or last for the entire p Continue reading >>

Menopause: Symptoms

Menopause: Symptoms

The time of life when a woman's ovaries stop producing hormones and menstrual periods stop. Natural menopause usually occurs around age 50. A woman is said to be in menopause when she hasn't had a period for 12 months in a row. PubMed Health Glossary (Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute) About Signs and Symptoms of Menopause About half to two-thirds of women will have hot flashes (also called "hot flushes") and sweats during menopause. These are the most common symptoms. If you have them at night, they can disturb your sleep. In some women hot flashes and sweats are hardly noticeable and do not cause any problems. In others they are sometimes so severe and frequent that it really affects their daily life. Hot flashes last about three minutes on average. How often women have hot flashes, how severe they are and how long they last can also vary from day to day. In most women hot flashes stop on their own after a year or two. But about a third of women have hot flashes for about five years. A few women have them for even longer. The lining of the vagina changes around menopause. It usually becomes thinner and drier. As women get older, their risk of bone fracture increases. Many women also gain a bit of weight around... Read more about Menopause: Symptoms This guideline is a partial update of ‘The epilepsies: the diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care’ (NICE clinical guideline 20, 2004). It updates the pharmacological management sections of the 2004 guideline and also includes the use of the ketogenic diet. In summary, a large number of women in the UK experience menopausal symptoms which, in many cases, can significantly affect their quality of life. It is probable that a minority of these women seek medical Continue reading >>

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