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Does Ketoacidosis Occur In Hypoglycemia

Dka In Hypoglycemia

Dka In Hypoglycemia

#2 0 They are two different entities. While they will both cause acidosis the mechanism of acidosis is different. DKA is from ketosis and acidosis from Hypoglycamia is lactic acid. Is this what you are asking? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment by eMedicineHealth.com An insulin reaction occurs when a person with diabetes becomes confused or even unconscious because of hypoglycemia (hypo=low + glycol = sug Continue reading >>

Can Plants Get Cancer?

Can Plants Get Cancer?

Plant don't get anything called cancer. However their are plant diseases that are caused by pathogens . Many plant pathogens act like “silent thieves” who want to steal money locked inside of a bank vault. These thieves use specialized tools designed to disable the bank’s security system and unlock the vault without being detected. In a similar way, many pathogens establish intimate connections with their hosts in order to suppress plant defenses and promote the release of nutrients.Many plant pathogens act like “silent thieves” who want to steal money locked inside of a bank vault. These thieves use specialized tools designed to disable the bank’s security system and unlock the vault without being detected. In a similar way, many pathogens establish intimate connections with their hosts in order to suppress plant defenses and promote the release of nutrients. Pathogens that keep their host alive and feed on living plant tissue are called biotrophs. Other pathogens resort to brute force like thieves who blast open a bank vault with explosives. These pathogens often produce toxins or tissue-degrading enzymes that overwhelm plant defenses and promote the quick release of nutrients. These pathogens are called necrotrophs, and examples include the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea. Some pathogens are biotrophic during the early stages of infection but become necrotrophic during the latter stages of disease. Eve though there are similarities between plant disease and cancer it's really comparing apples and oranges because animals and plants function so differently. Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

By Debra A. Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE, CLVT, OTR/L, SCLV What Is Hyperglycemia? In relation to diabetes, hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the American Diabetes Association. It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease, talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Complications from Hyperglycemia Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Stroke (cerebral vascular disease) Heart attack or Congestive Heart Failure (coronary heart disease) Circulation disorders and possible amputation (peripheral vascular disease) When smaller blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Kidney disease (nephropathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Joseph Monks: Writer, Producer, and Film Director Joseph Monks, who has diabetic retinopathy, creates and produces films for his production company Sight Unseen Pictures. He is also the first blind filmmaker to direct a feature film. Says Joe, "I'm not uncomfortable with the term 'blind.' I'm not thrilled about it, of course, but it's accurate. The lights went out for me in early 2002 as a result of diabetic retinopathy—the death of my retinas. It is what it is, so when it happened, I decided that I wasn't going to let it put an en Continue reading >>

Will Ketoacidosis Or Hypoglycemia Skew The Results Of A Blood Alcohol Test?

Will Ketoacidosis Or Hypoglycemia Skew The Results Of A Blood Alcohol Test?

Elevated blood ketones (as with diabetic ketoacidosis) can cause false elevation of blood test results. Alcohols others than ethanol (e.g., isopropyl [rubbing alcohol] or methanol [grain alcohol]) will also cause testing to be positive. Ask New Question Continue reading >>

What Are Possible Reasons Of Hypoglycemia That Occurs A Few Times In A Day (that Are Not Reactive Hypoglycemia, Diabetes Or Insulinoma)?

What Are Possible Reasons Of Hypoglycemia That Occurs A Few Times In A Day (that Are Not Reactive Hypoglycemia, Diabetes Or Insulinoma)?

Insulinoma is a rare form of tumour of the beta cells of pancreas resulting in an excessive secretion of insulin, leading to hypoglycaemia. Most insulinomas are benign, however a few metastasize. The symptoms of insulinoma are hypoglycaemia and associated symptoms such as blurred vision, lethargy, diplopia, light headedness, and convulsions, unconsciousness, which can also be life-threatening. Severe hypoglycemia may result in seizures, coma, and permanent neurological damage. Symptoms such as palpitations, tachycardia, sweating, hunger, anxiety etc. are caused by catecholaminergic response to hypoglycaemia triggered by insulinomas. Insulinomas occur in people between the ages of 40 and 60 and grow slowly. The exact causes of insulinoma are unknown, however, patients with multiple endocrine neplasia type 1 syndrome or von Hippel-Landau syndrome are more at risk. According to a cancer research, 10% of insulinomas are cancerous and approximately 10% of patients diagnosed with insulinoma have more than one tumour. Insulinomas affect between up to five people out of one million each year. Continue reading >>

Why Does Hypoglycemia Occur In Diabetes?

Why Does Hypoglycemia Occur In Diabetes?

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: ●Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) ●Does not eat enough food ●Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand ●Waits too long between meals ●Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: ●Sweat ●Tremble ●Feel hungry ●Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: ●Difficulty walking ●Weakness ●Difficulty seeing clearly ●Bizarre behavior or personality changes ●Confusion ●Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-blood glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level Continue reading >>

What Is Worse For A Diabetic, A Slightly Higher A1c (=7) Or Often Occurring Hypoglycemia?

What Is Worse For A Diabetic, A Slightly Higher A1c (=7) Or Often Occurring Hypoglycemia?

Thanks for the A2A. The A1c is worse, long-term. Hypoglycemia, if you survive it without brain damage, doesn’t have a lot of cumulative effect. High blood sugar does. A whole lot. All those awful things you hear about diabetics losing legs, kidneys, eyes? That’s high A1c. Now for some more useful information. A1c isn’t the best predictor of your diabetic complications —it is a cheap test. If you are marginal on A1c, a far better and easy test is one you can do yourself. Take your own blood sugar with a glucometer one hour after eating, and do not allow it to be over 140 mg/dl. If it is, modify your diet and meds dosage until it isn’t next time. As an added bonus, fixing your diet and meds to keep postprandial blood glucose below 140 is fairly low-risk for hypoglycaemia. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Short Term Complications

Short Term Complications

Tweet Short term complications occur if blood glucose levels go too low or too high for the body to function properly in the present state. Short term complications can present immediate danger and therefore need to be treated quickly to avoid emergencies. What are the short term complications of diabetes? The most common short term complications of diabetes are the following: Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a state of having blood glucose levels that are too low. Hypoglycemia is defined as having a blood glucose level of below 4.0 mmol/l. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, confusion and a raised pulse rate. If you take blood glucose lowering medication such as insulin, sulfonylureas and post prandial glucose regulators, it is important to treat hypoglycemia immediately to prevent blood glucose levels from going dangerously low. Hypoglycemia can also occur in people that do not take diabetes medication but in this case, the body should low blood sugar levels naturally and treatment is not normally needed unless you have a condition known as reactive hypoglycemia or will be carrying out a dangerous task such as operating machinery or driving. Read about hypoglycemia Ketoacidosis Ketoacidosis can occur if the body spends a significant amount of time with too little insulin to refuel the cells of the body. Without insulin the body will break down fat to release ketones into the blood that can be used for energy without the need for insulin to be present. However, if the level of ketones in the blood becomes too high, ketoacidosis is said to occur, and this condition can be very dangerous. Ketoacidosis will only usually occur if the body has too little insulin and there can affect people with type 1 diabetes, people that have had a pancreatectomy (surgical removal of the pa Continue reading >>

How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Human Brain?

How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Human Brain?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is the body’s emergency reaction to glucose starvation in the absence of insulin. It is a disastrous reaction — in general, it makes things worse rather than better, and starts a vicious cycle of blood acidity, rising blood glucose, dehydration, and blood hyperosmolality (high concentration of dissolved stuff) that can be hard to break. One of the hardest-hit organs in DKA is the brain, due to the dehydration and acidic blood entering that sensitive organ. Severe DKA may lead to brain swelling (edema) which is life-threatening. But recent studies have shown that even a short, apparently fully-recovered stint of DKA leads to measurable brain injury. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life–threatening consequence of diabetes. DKA occurs when there is a lack of insulin in the body causing hyperglycemia. As a result of the inability of glucose to enter the cells, the body must find other means to obtain energy. As such, fat breakdown occurs resulting in the accumulation of fatty acids. The fatty acids are metabolized to ketones that cause the blood to become acidotic (pH less than7.3). Because glucose remains in the blood, there is an increase in thirst and drinking to eliminate the solute load of glucose, which also results in increased urination (polyuria and polydipsia). Thus, the combination of increased serum acidity, weight loss, polyuria, and polydipsia may lead to extreme dehydration, coma, or brain damage. Without a doubt, the most severe acute complication of DKA is cerebral edema. Many cases of new onset type 1 diabetes present DKA (15-70 percent depending on age and geographic region, according to multiple studies), hence the importance of an early diagnosis of diabetes in order to avoid potential consequences. Much research is be Continue reading >>

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