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Does Ketoacidosis Cause Pain

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Th Continue reading >>

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  1. Clare R

    Burned esophagus after DKA

    I tried "Asking an Expert" but no answer yet on this… I need some advice here.
    I went into DKA over this past weekend. The vomiting burned my esophagus to the point that I can't eat regular foods because it hurts so bad. Has anyone experienced this? How long does the pain last? Any suggestions on how I can relieve the pain in the meantime? It's frustrating… swallowing food causes burning pain all the way from my throat down to my stomach.

  2. sandyfrazzini

    I did have that after one episode of DKA several years ago, only it was like everything I ate would give me really bad acid reflux. I don't recall a sore throat, but what I did have lasted a few weeks and was a real pain. Good luck to you, hope you are feeling better soon.

  3. Clare R

    All they gave me for the esophagus pain in the hospital was aluminum hydroxide (kinda like MOM) and it didn't help. And then they'd bring me a bunch of things I couldn't eat. I did my best and ate what I could, but that wasn't much. Even water was hard to get down. I don't have a problem with Vicodin… I've taken it plenty of times without withdrawal effects. I'm not sure if throat spray would work, unless I maybe took a swig of it before eating, but I doubt that's recommended.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency rela Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Clare R

    Burned esophagus after DKA

    I tried "Asking an Expert" but no answer yet on this… I need some advice here.
    I went into DKA over this past weekend. The vomiting burned my esophagus to the point that I can't eat regular foods because it hurts so bad. Has anyone experienced this? How long does the pain last? Any suggestions on how I can relieve the pain in the meantime? It's frustrating… swallowing food causes burning pain all the way from my throat down to my stomach.

  2. sandyfrazzini

    I did have that after one episode of DKA several years ago, only it was like everything I ate would give me really bad acid reflux. I don't recall a sore throat, but what I did have lasted a few weeks and was a real pain. Good luck to you, hope you are feeling better soon.

  3. Clare R

    All they gave me for the esophagus pain in the hospital was aluminum hydroxide (kinda like MOM) and it didn't help. And then they'd bring me a bunch of things I couldn't eat. I did my best and ate what I could, but that wasn't much. Even water was hard to get down. I don't have a problem with Vicodin… I've taken it plenty of times without withdrawal effects. I'm not sure if throat spray would work, unless I maybe took a swig of it before eating, but I doubt that's recommended.

  4. -> Continue reading
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People always freak out when I tell them I am doing keto. I even have one friend that refers to my diet as "The Ketoacidosis Diet". I can't get him to understand the difference, but maybe this will help you! Find Me On Twitter: www.twitter.com/HeavyKevi Instagram: www.instagram.com/TheHeavyTruthTV Follow My Macros on MyFitnessPal @The HeavyTruth Facebook Group: Facebook.com/Groups/TheHeavyTruthTV Subscribe to my Essential Oils Channel: https://goo.gl/El053Q Send Questions or Testimonials By Mail: Kevin Gillem P.O.Box 291517 Phelan, CA 92329 My Favorite Low Carb Sweetener - http://amzn.to/2smCmDM I recommend Smackfat Ketone Strips - http://amzn.to/2laB9MG I use the Match DNA Milk Frother - http://amzn.to/2klHt4o I use NOW MCT Oil - http://amzn.to/2kOs48S I'm Kevin and I have used a Ketogenic diet, Intermittent Fasting and Extended Fasting to successfully lose 160 pounds and I am still shrinking. I hope to one day be half the man I was at 400 pounds. During this journey I have learned a lot about weight loss, Metabolic syndrome, Insulin Resistance, LCHF dieting and overall health in general. I am greatly interested in continuing to learn about health related topics and sharing what I learn with others so that all of our lives can be improved. Please like and subscribe to my channel so that I can share the things I learn that I think are important for all of our well being. I would also appreciate feedback from you all so I can share it with other subscribers and we can all grow as a community. I am not a doctor. I am not licensed. I do not hold any qualifications for giving medical advice. This is an account of my own experiences and does not apply to anyone else. All information, content, and material of this channel is for informational purposes only and are not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. If you have questions about your own personal situation it is recommended that you discuss them with your own licensed healthcare professional. If you think you are having an emergency, dial 911 immediately.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath od Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Clare R

    Burned esophagus after DKA

    I tried "Asking an Expert" but no answer yet on this… I need some advice here.
    I went into DKA over this past weekend. The vomiting burned my esophagus to the point that I can't eat regular foods because it hurts so bad. Has anyone experienced this? How long does the pain last? Any suggestions on how I can relieve the pain in the meantime? It's frustrating… swallowing food causes burning pain all the way from my throat down to my stomach.

  2. sandyfrazzini

    I did have that after one episode of DKA several years ago, only it was like everything I ate would give me really bad acid reflux. I don't recall a sore throat, but what I did have lasted a few weeks and was a real pain. Good luck to you, hope you are feeling better soon.

  3. Clare R

    All they gave me for the esophagus pain in the hospital was aluminum hydroxide (kinda like MOM) and it didn't help. And then they'd bring me a bunch of things I couldn't eat. I did my best and ate what I could, but that wasn't much. Even water was hard to get down. I don't have a problem with Vicodin… I've taken it plenty of times without withdrawal effects. I'm not sure if throat spray would work, unless I maybe took a swig of it before eating, but I doubt that's recommended.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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