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Does Ketoacidosis Cause Hypokalemia

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Episode 60.0 – Aggressive Resuscitation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Show Notes Take Home Points DKA should be suspected in any patient with altered mental status and hyperglycemia. Get a VBG (ABG not necessary) to confirm the diagnosis. Hypokalemia kills in DKA. Aggresively replete potassium and consider holding insulin, which drops serum potassium, until K is greater than 3.5 The insulin bolus isn’t necessary and appears to cause more episodes of hypokalemia. Just start insulin as an infusion at 0.14 units/kg Be vigilant about cerebral edema. Any change or deterioration in mental status should prompt treatment and evaluation. Mannitol in the euvolemic, normotensive patient and 3% hypertonic saline in the hypotensive/hypovolemic patient Finally, don’t forge to always hunt down the underlying cause of the DKA. Infection and non-compliance is the most common so liberally administer broad spectrum antibiotics if you’ve got even a hint of infection brewing Additional Reading References Aurora S et al. Prevalence of hypokalemia in ED patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Am J Emerg Med 2012; 30: 481-4. PMID: 21316179 Boyd JC et al. Relationship of potassium and magnesium concentrations in serum to cardiac arrhythmias. Clin Chem 1984; 30(5): 754-7. Continue reading >>

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  1. metalmd06

    Does acute DKA cause hyperkalemia, or is the potassium normal or low due to osmotic diuresis? I get the acute affect of metabolic acidosis on potassium (K+ shifts from intracellular to extracellular compartments). According to MedEssentials, the initial response (<24 hours) is increased serum potassium. The chronic effect occuring within 24 hours is a compensatory increase in Aldosterone that normalizes or ultimatley decreases the serum K+. Then it says on another page that because of osmotic diuresis, there is K+ wasting with DKA. On top of that, I had a question about a diabetic patient in DKA with signs of hyperkalemia. Needless to say, I'm a bit confused. Any help is appreciated.

  2. FutureDoc4

    I remember this being a tricky point:
    1) DKA leads to a decreased TOTAL body K+ (due to diuresis) (increase urine flow, increase K+ loss)
    2) Like you said, during DKA, acidosis causes an exchange of H+/K+ leading to hyperkalemia.
    So, TOTAL body K+ is low, but the patient presents with hyperkalemia. Why is this important? Give, insulin, pushes the K+ back into the cells and can quickly precipitate hypokalemia and (which we all know is bad). Hope that is helpful.

  3. Cooolguy

    DKA-->Anion gap M. Acidosis-->K+ shift to extracellular component--> hyperkalemia-->symptoms and signs
    DKA--> increased osmoles-->Osmotic diuresis-->loss of K+ in urine-->decreased total body K+ (because more has been seeped from the cells)
    --dont confuse total body K+ with EC K+
    Note: osmotic diuresis also causes polyuria, ketonuria, glycosuria, and loss of Na+ in urine--> Hyponatremia
    DKA tx: Insulin (helps put K+ back into cells), and K+ (to replenish the low total potassium
    Hope it helps

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Definition: A hyperglycemic, acidotic state caused by insulin deficiency. The disease state consists of 3 parameters: Hyperglycemia (glucose > 250 mg/dl) Acidosis Ketosis Epidemiology Incidence of ~ 10,000 cases/year in US Mortality rate: 2-5% (prior to insulin was 100%) (Lebovitz 1995) Pathophysiology Insulin deficiency leads to serum glucose rise Increased glucose load in kidney leads to increased glucose in urine and osmotic diuresis Osmotic diuresis is accompanied by loss of electrolytes including sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium Volume depletion leads to impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) Inability to properly metabolize glucose results in fatty acid breakdown with resultant ketone bodies (acetoacetate + beta-hydroxybutyrate) Causes: An acute insult leads to decompensation of a chronic disease. Can also be first manifestation of new onset diabetes (particularly in children). Below are common triggers Infection (particularly sepsis) Myocardial ischemia or infarction Medication non-compliance Clinical Presentation History Polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia Weakness Weight loss Nausea/Vomiting Abdominal Pain Physical Examination Acetone odor on breath (“fruity” s Continue reading >>

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  1. nurseprnRN

    The hypokalemia comes when the patient gets treated with insulin, driving the glucose and K+ into the cells. The kidneys can't (and won't) move so much out through urine with the excess glucose to make for hypokalemia.

  2. Esme12

    There can be a brief period of hypoglycemia in the early stages of an elevated blood sugar (polyuria)....but by the time "ketoacidosis" sets in the Serum potassium is elevated but the cellular potassium is depleted (all that shifting that goes on)
    Diabetic ketoacidosis

  3. April2152

    So pretty much what we would observe clinically is hyperkalemia because the osmotic duiresis does not move serum potassium significantly?

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DKA and HHS (HHNS) nursing NCLEX lecture review of the treatment, patient signs/symptoms, and management. Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemia nonketotic syndrome are two complications that can present in diabetes mellitus. DKA is more common in type 1 diabetics, whereas, HHNS is more common in type 2 diabetics. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis will present with ketosis and acidosis and signs/symptoms will include hyperglycemia (greater than 300 mg/dL), Kussmaul breathing, fruity (acetone breath), ketones in the urine, and metabolic acidosis. Patients with hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome will NOT have ketosis or acidosis but EXTREME hyperglycemia (greater than 600 mg/dL). In addition, hyperosmolarity will present which will cause major osmotic diuresis and the patient will experience with severe dehydration. Quiz on DKA vs HHNS: http://www.registerednursern.com/dka-... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/dka-... Diabetes NCLEX Review Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Video on DKA (detailed lecture): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxrCV... Video on HHNS (detailed lecture): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyExA... Subs

Dka/hhns

Sort Metabolic acidosis HCO3 <22 pH <7.35 paCO2 normal (uncompensated) paCO2 <35 (partially compensated) pH 7.35-7.39 (acidic normal) & paCO2 <35 (fully compensated) "If ill, take your insulin and drink clear liquids with carbohydrate." The client must be familiar with "sick day" management. He should take his insulin, check his blood glucose every 1 to 4 hr, and if unable to eat solid food, take in small frequent amounts of fluids and glucose-containing beverages. Which of the following is an appropriate client instruction regarding DKA prevention? Abdominal pain The client with HHNS would not have abdominal pain, a symptom of acidosis. Confusion from dehydration would be present, as would thirst and frequent urination. Which of the following signs and symptoms is least likely in HHNS? Metabolic acidosis secondary to breakdown of fats for energy manifested by ketosis is most likely. Rapid, deep respirations (Kussmaul's respirations) will show compensation for the acidosis as the body "blows off" carbon dioxide, a respiratory acid. What type of acid-base imbalance is likely in a client with DKA? How would the nurse recognize compensation for this acid-base disorder? Physical and/or Continue reading >>

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  1. nurseprnRN

    The hypokalemia comes when the patient gets treated with insulin, driving the glucose and K+ into the cells. The kidneys can't (and won't) move so much out through urine with the excess glucose to make for hypokalemia.

  2. Esme12

    There can be a brief period of hypoglycemia in the early stages of an elevated blood sugar (polyuria)....but by the time "ketoacidosis" sets in the Serum potassium is elevated but the cellular potassium is depleted (all that shifting that goes on)
    Diabetic ketoacidosis

  3. April2152

    So pretty much what we would observe clinically is hyperkalemia because the osmotic duiresis does not move serum potassium significantly?

  4. -> Continue reading
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