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Does Ketoacidosis Cause Hyperkalemia

Pseudomyocardial Infarction In A Patient With Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Mild Hyperkalemia

Pseudomyocardial Infarction In A Patient With Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Mild Hyperkalemia

Volume 2019 |Article ID 4063670 | 4 pages | Pseudomyocardial Infarction in a Patient with Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Mild Hyperkalemia ,1 ngel No del Cueto-Aguilera,1 Ral Alberto Jimnez-Castillo,1 Olga Norali de la Cruz-Mata,1 Mariana Fikir-Ordoez,1 Raymundo Vera-Pineda,1 Dal Alejandro Hernndez-Guajardo,1 Alejandro Ordaz-Faras 1Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Universitario, Universidad Autnoma de Nuevo Len, Monterrey, Nuevo Len, Mexico 2Echocardiography Laboratory, Cardiology Service, Hospital Universitario, Universidad Autnoma de Nuevo Len, Monterrey, Nuevo Len, Mexico A 48-year-old male with a prior diagnosis of diabetes mellitus presented to the emergency department with malaise and nausea. On work-up, he was found with hyperglycemia and high anion gap metabolic acidosis, with a blood . A diagnosis of severe diabetic ketoacidosis was established; serum electrolyte analysis showed mild hyperkalemia. On work-up, a 12-lead electrocardiogram was obtained, and it showed an ST-segment elevation on anterior leads that completely resolved with diabetic ketoacidosis treatment. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction can be a precipitant factor for diabetic ketoacidosis, and evaluation of diabetic patients with suspected myocardial infarction can be challenging since they can present with atypical or little symptoms. Hyperkalemia, which usually accompanies diabetic ketoacidosis, can cause electrocardiographic alterations that are well described, but ST-segment elevation is uncommon. A pseudomyocardial infarction pattern has been described in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis; of note, most of these patients presented severe hyperkalemia. We believe this is of great importance for clinicians because they must be able to recognize those patients that present w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Producing Extreme Hyperkalemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes On Hemodialysis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Producing Extreme Hyperkalemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes On Hemodialysis

Diabetic ketoacidosis producing extreme hyperkalemia in a patient with type 1 diabetes on hemodialysis. 1. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Jichi Medical University Saitama Medical Center, Saitama, Japan. 2. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, Nasushiobara, Japan. Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Case Reports, 04 Sep 2017, 2017 DOI: 10.1530/EDM-17-0068 PMID: 28924484PMCID: PMC5592707 Share this article Share with emailShare with twitterShare with linkedinShare with facebook Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a critical complication of type 1 diabetes associated with water and electrolyte disorders. Here, we report a case of DKA with extreme hyperkalemia (9.0 mEq/L) in a patient with type 1 diabetes on hemodialysis. He had a left frontal cerebral infarction resulting in inability to manage his continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump. Electrocardiography showed typical changes of hyperkalemia, including absent P waves, prolonged QRS interval and tented T waves. There was no evidence of total body water deficit. After starting insulin and rapid hemodialysis, the serum potassium level was normalized. Although DKA may present with hypokalemia, rapid hemodialysis may be necessary to resolve severe hyperkalemia in a patient with renal failure.Patients with type 1 diabetes on hemodialysis may develop ketoacidosis because of discontinuation of insulin treatment.Patients on hemodialysis who develop ketoacidosis may have hyperkalemia because of anuria.Absolute insulin deficit alters potassium distribution between the intracellular and extracellular space, and anuria abolishes urinary excretion of potassium.Rapid hemodialysis along with intensive insulin therapy can improve hyperkalemia, while fluid infu Continue reading >>

Serum Potassium In Lactic Acidosis And Ketoacidosis

Serum Potassium In Lactic Acidosis And Ketoacidosis

This article has no abstract; the first 100 words appear below. METABOLIC acidosis has been thought to elevate serum potassium concentration.1 , 2 However, hyperkalemia was not found in recent studies in patients with postictal lactic acidosis3 or in dogs infused with lactic acid4 , 5 or 3-hydroxybutyric acid5 — observations that raise questions about the association between metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia: Does metabolic acidosis cause hyperkalemia or is the latter an epiphenomenon? Does metabolic acidosis (or acidemia) cause hyperkalemia only when acidosis is due to excess "mineral acids," and not to excess organic acids? With the hope of providing some clarification of these questions, I have reviewed initial laboratory data and clinical findings in . . . We are indebted to Dr. Henry Hoberman, of the Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, for the lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate analyses. From the Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and the Bronx Municipal Hospital Center (address reprint requests to Dr. Fulop at the Department of Medicine, Bronx Municipal Hospital Center, Pelham Parkway South and Eastchester Road, Bronx, NY 10461). Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Lactic Acidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Introduction A 49-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of dyspnea for 2 days. He had a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and a severe dilated cardiomyopathy. He had been hospitalized several times in the previous year for decompensated congestive heart failure (most recently, 1 month earlier). The plasma creatinine concentration was 1.13 mg/dl on discharge. Outpatient medications included insulin, digoxin, warfarin, spironolactone, metoprolol succinate, furosemide (80 mg two times per day; increased from 40 mg daily 1 month earlier), metolazone (2.5 mg daily; added 1 month earlier), and metformin (2500 mg in three divided doses; increased from 1000 mg 1 month earlier). Physical examination revealed an obese man in moderate respiratory distress. The temperature was 36.8°C, BP was 119/83 mmHg, and heart rate was 96 per minute. Peripheral hemoglobin oxygen saturation was 97% on room air, with a respiratory rate of 26 per minute. The heart rhythm was irregularly irregular; there was no S3 or murmur. Jugular venous pressure was about 8 cm. There was 1+ edema at the ankles. A chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly and central venous prominence. The N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level was 5137 pg/ml (reference range = 1–138 pg/ml). The peripheral hemoglobin concentration was 12.5 g/dl, the white blood cell count was 12,500/µl (76% granulocytes), and the platelet count was 332,000/µL. Initial plasma chemistries are shown in Table 1. The impression was decompensated congestive heart failure. After administration of furosemide (160 mg intravenously), the urine output increased to 320 ml over the next 1 hour. There was no improvement in the dyspnea. Within 2 hours, the patient’s BP fell to 100/64 mmHg Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia

Hyperkalemia

Hyperkalemia, also spelled hyperkalaemia, is an elevated level of potassium (K+) in the blood serum.[1] Normal potassium levels are between 3.5 and 5.0 mmol/L (3.5 and 5.0 mEq/L) with levels above 5.5 mmol/L defined as hyperkalemia.[3][4] Typically this results in no symptoms.[1] Occasionally when severe it results in palpitations, muscle pain, muscle weakness, or numbness.[1][2] An abnormal heart rate can occur which can result in cardiac arrest and death.[1][3] Common causes include kidney failure, hypoaldosteronism, and rhabdomyolysis.[1] A number of medications can also cause high blood potassium including spironolactone, NSAIDs, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.[1] The severity is divided into mild (5.5-5.9 mmol/L), moderate (6.0-6.4 mmol/L), and severe (>6.5 mmol/L).[3] High levels can also be detected on an electrocardiogram (ECG).[3] Pseudohyperkalemia, due to breakdown of cells during or after taking the blood sample, should be ruled out.[1][2] Initial treatment in those with ECG changes is calcium gluconate.[1][3] Medications that might worsen the condition should be stopped and a low potassium diet should be recommended.[1] Other medications used include dextrose with insulin, salbutamol, and sodium bicarbonate.[1][5] Measures to remove potassium from the body include furosemide, polystyrene sulfonate, and hemodialysis.[1] Hemodialysis is the most effective method.[3] The use of polystyrene sulfonate, while common, is poorly supported by evidence.[6] Hyperkalemia is rare among those who are otherwise healthy.[7] Among those who are in hospital, rates are between 1% and 2.5%.[2] It increases the overall risk of death by at least ten times.[2][7] The word "hyperkalemia" is from hyper- meaning high; kalium meaning potassium; and -emia, meaning "in th Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Sciencedirect

Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Sciencedirect

Volume 299, Issue 3 , March 1990, Pages 164-169 Author links open overlay panel MilfordFulopMD Get rights and content Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis tend to have somewhat elevated serum K+ concentrations despite decreased body K+ content. The hyperkalemia was previously attributed mainly to acidemia. However, recent studies have suggested that organic acidemias (such as that produced by infusing beta-hydroxybutyric acid) may not cause hyperkalemia. To learn which, if any, routinely measured biochemical indices might correlate with the finding of hyperkalemia in diabetic ketoacidosis, we analyzed the initial pre-treatment values in 131 episodes in 91 patients. Serum K+correlated independently and significantly (p < 0.001) with blood pH (r = 0.39), serum urea N (r = 0.38) and the anion gap (r = 0.41). The mean serum K+ among the men was 5.55 mmol/ 1, significantly higher than among the women, 5.09 mmol/1 (p < 0.005). Twelve of the 16 patients with serum K+ 6.5 mmol/1 were men, as were all eight patients with serum K+ 7.0 mmol/1. Those differences paralleled a significantly higher mean serum urea N concentration among the men (15.1 mmol/1) than the women (11.2 mmol/1, p < 0.01). The greater tendency to hyperkalemia among the men in this series may have been due partly to their greater renal dysfunction during the acute illness. However, other factors that were not assessed, such as cell K+ release associated with protein catabolism, and insulin deficiency per se, may also have affected serum K+ in these patients. Continue reading >>

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Lack of insulin, thus no proper metabolism of glucose, ketones form, pH goes down, H+ concentration rises, our body tries to compensate by exchanging K+ from inside the cells for H+ outside the cells, hoping to lower H+ concentration, but at the same time elevating serum potassium. Most people are seriously dehydrated, so are in acute kidney failure, thus the kidneys aren’t able to excrete the excess of potassium from the blood, compounding the problem. On the other hand, many in reality are severely potassium depleted, so once lots of fluid so rehydration and a little insulin is administered serum potassium will plummet, so needs to be monitored 2 hourly - along with glucose, sodium and kidney function - to prevent severe hypokalemia causing fatal arrhythmias, like we experienced decades ago when this wasn’t so well understood yet. In practice, once the patient started peeing again, we started adding potassium chloride to our infusion fluids, the surplus potassium would be peed out by our kidneys so no risk for hyperkalemia. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia In A Young Woman With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Hyperkalemia In A Young Woman With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

A 32-year-old woman with multiple medical problems was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and weakness. The family noted progressive confusion and fatigue over 2 days, coupled with extreme weakness. The patient and family denied all other complaints as well as any traumatic or toxicologic events. The medical history included juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension, renal insufficiency, and diabetic retinopathy with visual impairment; the patient used insulin and lisinopril as well as several other unknown medications. On examination, she was confused and lethargic but was aroused by stimuli and spoke coherently. Vital signs were: blood pressure, 188/106 mmHg; pulse, approximately 70 beats/min; respiratory rate, 24 breaths/min; temperature, 36.1°C (97°F); and oxygen saturation, 94% on room air; the ECG monitor demonstrated the rhythm strip in Figure 1. A bedside glucose test was 256 mg/dL. The remainder of the examination was unremarkable. Results of a 12-lead ECG are seen in Figure 2. Based upon the ECG findings noted in Figures 1 and 2, which of the following best describe the patient’s risk of an adverse event and the most appropriate management: A. Low risk; atropine IV and glucagon IV B. Intermediate risk; transcutaneous pacing and IV epinephrine infusion C. High risk; synchronized electrical cardioversion with amiodarone IV D. Extremely high risk; calcium IV, sodium bicarbonate IV, and dextrose/insulin IV Correct Answer: D. Extremely high risk; calcium IV, sodium bicarbonate IV, and dextrose/insulin IV Discussion Hyperkalemia presents across a spectrum of severity, ranging from asymptomatic discovery to cardiorespiratory arrest. Of the various electrolyte disorders, it is perhaps the most serious with the potential for severe adverse outco Continue reading >>

Causes And Evaluation Of Hyperkalemia In Adults

Causes And Evaluation Of Hyperkalemia In Adults

INTRODUCTION Hyperkalemia is a common clinical problem. Potassium enters the body via oral intake or intravenous infusion, is largely stored in the cells, and is then excreted in the urine. The major causes of hyperkalemia are increased potassium release from the cells and, most often, reduced urinary potassium excretion (table 1). This topic will review the causes and evaluation of hyperkalemia. The clinical manifestations, treatment, and prevention of hyperkalemia, as well as a detailed discussion of hypoaldosteronism (an important cause of hyperkalemia), are presented elsewhere. (See "Clinical manifestations of hyperkalemia in adults" and "Treatment and prevention of hyperkalemia in adults" and "Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoaldosteronism (type 4 RTA)".) BRIEF REVIEW OF POTASSIUM PHYSIOLOGY An understanding of potassium physiology is helpful when approaching patients with hyperkalemia. Total body potassium stores are approximately 3000 meq or more (50 to 75 meq/kg body weight) [1]. In contrast to sodium, which is the major cation in the extracellular fluid and has a much lower concentration in the cells, potassium is primarily an intracellular cation, with the cells containing approximately 98 percent of body potassium. The intracellular potassium concentration is approximately 140 meq/L compared with 4 to 5 meq/L in the extracellular fluid. The difference in distribution of the two cations is maintained by the Na-K-ATPase pump in the cell membrane, which pumps sodium out of and potassium into the cell in a 3:2 ratio. The ratio of the potassium concentrations in the cells and the extracellular fluid is the major determinant of the resting membrane potential across the cell membrane, which sets the stage for the generation of the action potential that is e Continue reading >>

What Causes Potassium And Sodium Loss In Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)?

What Causes Potassium And Sodium Loss In Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)?

What causes potassium and sodium loss in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)? Glucosuria leads to osmotic diuresis, dehydration and hyperosmolarity. Severe dehydration, if not properly compensated, may lead to impaired renal function. Hyperglycemia, osmotic diuresis, serum hyperosmolarity, and metabolic acidosis result in severe electrolyte disturbances. The most characteristic disturbance is total body potassium loss. This loss is not mirrored in serum potassium levels, which may be low, within the reference range, or even high. Potassium loss is caused by a shift of potassium from the intracellular to the extracellular space in an exchange with hydrogen ions that accumulate extracellularly in acidosis. Much of the shifted extracellular potassium is lost in urine because of osmotic diuresis. Patients with initial hypokalemia are considered to have severe and serious total body potassium depletion. High serum osmolarity also drives water from intracellular to extracellular space, causing dilutional hyponatremia. Sodium also is lost in the urine during the osmotic diuresis. Glaser NS, Marcin JP, Wootton-Gorges SL, et al. Correlation of clinical and biochemical findings with diabetic ketoacidosis-related cerebral edema in children using magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging. J Pediatr. 2008 Jun 25. [Medline] . Umpierrez GE, Jones S, Smiley D, et al. Insulin analogs versus human insulin in the treatment of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis: a randomized controlled trial. Diabetes Care. 2009 Jul. 32(7):1164-9. [Medline] . [Full Text] . Herrington WG, Nye HJ, Hammersley MS, Watkinson PJ. Are arterial and venous samples clinically equivalent for the estimation of pH, serum bicarbonate and potassium concentration in critically ill patients?. Diabet Med. 2012 Jan. 29(1):32-5 Continue reading >>

On The Relationship Between Potassium And Acid-base Balance

On The Relationship Between Potassium And Acid-base Balance

The notion that acid-base and potassium homeostasis are linked is well known. Students of laboratory medicine will learn that in general acidemia (reduced blood pH) is associated with increased plasma potassium concentration (hyperkalemia), whilst alkalemia (increased blood pH) is associated with reduced plasma potassium concentration (hypokalemia). A frequently cited mechanism for these findings is that acidosis causes potassium to move from cells to extracellular fluid (plasma) in exchange for hydrogen ions, and alkalosis causes the reverse movement of potassium and hydrogen ions. As a recently published review makes clear, all the above may well be true, but it represents a gross oversimplification of the complex ways in which disorders of acid-base affect potassium metabolism and disorders of potassium affect acid-base balance. The review begins with an account of potassium homeostasis with particular detailed attention to the renal handling of potassium and regulation of potassium excretion in urine. This discussion includes detail of the many cellular mechanisms of potassium reabsorption and secretion throughout the renal tubule and collecting duct that ensure, despite significant variation in dietary intake, that plasma potassium remains within narrow, normal limits. There follows discussion of the ways in which acid-base disturbances affect these renal cellular mechanisms of potassium handling. For example, it is revealed that acidosis decreases potassium secretion in the distal renal tubule directly by effect on potassium secretory channels and indirectly by increasing ammonia production. The clinical consequences of the physiological relation between acid-base and potassium homeostasis are addressed under three headings: Hyperkalemia in Acidosis; Hypokalemia w Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia And Hypokalemia

Hyperkalemia And Hypokalemia

Hyperkalemia is defined as a serum potassium concentration (serum [K+]) greater than 5.0 mEq/L. In critically ill patients, hyperkalemia is less frequent than hypokalemia but more likely to cause serious complications. Severe hyperkalemia requires rapid correction to prevent serious cardiovascular complications. The measured value for serum [K+] can be elevated as a result of in vitro phenomena, usually the release of K+ from cells during the clotting process. Pseudohyperkalemia should be recognized and considered in patients with marked elevations of white blood cell or platelet count.3 Simultaneous measurements of plasma (unclotted) and serum (clotted) [K+] should identify this problem. A serum [K+] that is 0.2 to 0.3 mEq/L greater than plasma [K+] is indicative of pseudohyperkalemia. Pseudohyperkalemia also may result from hemolysis of a blood specimen after collection; this event is usually identified in the laboratory and reported. True hyperkalemia occurs by two mechanisms: (1) impaired K+ excretion and (2) shifts in intracellular and extracellular K+ (Box 14-1). Renal insufficiency is the most common cause of altered K+ excretion. With acute oliguric renal failure, elevated potassium level, if not treated, is life threatening. In most patients with nonoliguric chronic renal failure, mild hyperkalemia is evident.4 With some causes of chronic renal failure, such as diabetes mellitus and tubulointerstitial diseases, hyperkalemia is more pronounced and is probably related to low circulating renin and aldosterone levels.5 Decreased aldosterone production promotes the development of hyperkalemia. Patients with acquired adrenal insufficiency develop hyperkalemia despite normal renal function. Various drugs used in the intensive care unit (ICU) can produce hyperkalemia b Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of High Potassium In Dogs?

What Are The Causes Of High Potassium In Dogs?

Potassium is an electrolyte that is found in the cells and in the blood of your dog's body. An ideal potassium level is essential for controlling your dog's nerve impulses, brain function and muscle activity. It also plays a vital role in regulating your dog's heart function. The normal reference range for a dog's blood potassium level falls between 3.6 and 5.5 mEq/L. When your dog's potassium level dips too low, the condition is referred to as hypokalemia. Conversely, if his potassium level climbs too high, your dog is suffering from hyperkalemia. Your dog's potassium level is determined by performing a blood chemistry profile. Your dog's kidneys are responsible for filtering wastes from your dog's blood so that they may be expelled from your dog's body when he urinates. Optimal kidney function is vital to maintaining healthy levels of enzymes, minerals and other important substances, including potassium. Your veterinarian will perform an electrocardiogram on your dog to assess his heart rate and rhythm. He or she will review your dog's medical history and ask questions regarding your dog's recent activities, including drinking and urinating frequencies. Diagnostic tests will include a complete blood count, a blood chemistry profile and a urinalysis. Additional blood tests and radiographs may be ordered to determine the underlying cause of hyperkalemia. When your dog's kidneys no longer function optimally, potassium and other wastes build up in your dog's system. Acute anuric, meaning insufficient urine production, and acute oliguric, meaning complete shut down of kidney function, kidney failures are the most frequent causes of hyperkalemia in dogs. Some common causes of acute kidney failure include antifreeze ingestion and leptospirosis infection. Chronic renal failur Continue reading >>

Merck And The Merck Manuals

Merck And The Merck Manuals

Hyperkalemia is a serum potassium concentration > 5.5 mEq/L, usually resulting from decreased renal potassium excretion or abnormal movement of potassium out of cells. There are usually several simultaneous contributing factors, including increased potassium intake, drugs that impair renal potassium excretion, and acute kidney injury or chronic kidney disease. Hyperkalemia can also occur in metabolic acidosis as in diabetic ketoacidosis. Clinical manifestations are generally neuromuscular, resulting in muscle weakness and cardiac toxicity that, when severe, can degenerate to ventricular fibrillation or asystole. Diagnosis is by measuring serum potassium. Treatment may involve decreasing potassium intake, adjusting drugs, giving a cation exchange resin and, in emergencies, calcium gluconate, insulin, and dialysis. A common cause of increased serum potassium concentration is probably pseudohyperkalemia, which is most often caused by hemolysis of RBCs in the blood sample. This can also occur from prolonged application of a tourniquet or excessive fist clenching when drawing venous blood. Thrombocytosis can cause pseudohyperkalemia in serum (platelet potassium is released during clotting), as can extreme leukocytosis. Normal kidneys eventually excrete potassium loads, so sustained, nonartifactual hyperkalemia usually implies diminished renal potassium excretion. However, other factors usually contribute. They can include increased potassium intake, increased potassium release from cells, or both (see Table: Factors Contributing to Hyperkalemia). When sufficient potassium chloride is rapidly ingested or given parenterally, severe hyperkalemia may result even when renal function is normal, but this is usually temporary. Hyperkalemia due to total body potassium excess is parti Continue reading >>

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