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Does Ketoacidosis Cause Bad Breath

Can Anorexia Nervosa Cause Bad Breath (halitosis)?

Can Anorexia Nervosa Cause Bad Breath (halitosis)?

The easy cases of bad breath can be fixed by brushing and flossing. Drink lots of water. Use mouthwash and remember to brush your tongue too. But there are other things that can cause bad breath. Smoking is an obvious culprit. Foods like garlic and onions can cause bad breath long after you brush them out of your mouth. Dry mouth can cause bad breath, drinking plenty of water helps, as does chewing gum. Some illnesses and medicines may also cause bad breath, and plaque or tartar on teeth and gum disease may also contribute. Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Cause Bad Breath And How To Prevent It?

How Does Diabetes Cause Bad Breath And How To Prevent It?

Bad breath is unpleasant smell that is felt as soon as a person opens his mouth. The clinical name of bad breath is halitosis. Bad breath is associated with number of conditions. In fact if you have bad breath it is a tell tale sign of something is wrong in your body. For example a fruity odor from mouth can be indicating diabetes or ammonia smell is associated with kidney problems etc. Many other diseases and factors can produce foul odor from mouth, especially due to poor oral and dental hygiene. Bad breath can make a person feel loss of self esteem due to which he starts avoiding social interactions. Causes Of Bad Breath Due To Diabetes There are various causes of bad breath, but most often it is linked with poor oral hygiene. Some medical conditions including diabetes, kidney failure and liver diseases increases the susceptibility for developing bad odor. In diabetes, bad breath has its link with high level of glucose in the blood. There are two leading factors that may be responsible for bad breath in diabetics; periodontal disease and increased ketone bodies when diabetes is uncontrolled. Periodontal disease: Gingivitis and other gum infections comprise to form periodontal diseases. People suffering from diabetes are more prone to develop gum problems. On the other hand, gingivitis can also become more severe if it occurs in a diabetic individual. Besides both periodontal disease and diabetes increases the risk of heart ailments and stroke. Diabetes affects the blood vessels and in long term it can cause reduction in blood flow in gums and all over the body. Poor blood supply due to diabetes can damage teeth and gums, further increasing the risk of tooth and gum infection. Raised glucose level in blood and mouth helps in promoting growth of bacteria which causes b Continue reading >>

What Causes Bad Breath?

What Causes Bad Breath?

Most often, but not always, halitosis, commonly known as bad breath, is related to what you eat and your dental hygiene habits. If the problem is not chronic, it may simply be the result of something you ate during your last meal. Garlic, onions, curry, and peppers are examples of smells that cannot be easily disguised by sucking on a mint or chewing gum. Offensive odor is produced when gases such as hydrogen sulfide, skatole, etc., are released due to bacterial activity, mostly during food intake. Some of the bacteria cannot live where there is oxygen; these are called anaerobic. Are you wondering how they can survive in your mouth? They do so by hiding in the crevices in your tongue, between your teeth, and tucked into your gums. At night, if you sleep with your mouth closed, you provide less oxygen, and they thrive, resulting in "morning breath." Bacteria that live on the tongue cause 90% of all cases. The tongue is a relatively dry part of the mouth, and its surface is covered with grooves and ridges that trap food particles, dry epithelial cells, and sinus drip. As such, it is essential to brush your teeth and tongue every morning, and never skip this routine. Underlying Causes If you not eating pungent foods and still have halitosis, it may be that you are not adequately brushing and flossing your teeth. By not removing all of the food particles that stick to the tongue, teeth, and gums, you are providing a growth medium for anaerobic bacteria, which will then give you odorous breath. Because you actually inhale these strong odors into your lungs, these smells are detectable hours after they were eaten – even after you have brushed. However, brushing and flossing may not prevent the odor from returning until the cause has been identified and eliminated from your Continue reading >>

Bad Breath

Bad Breath

Bad breath, or halitosis, is a common complaint in the dental office. That rotten-egg smell that comes from your mouth – sometimes referred to as VSCs, or volatile sulfur compounds – can be caused by gum disease. Another culprit is bacteria, or plaque, which can grow on the surface of the tongue and teeth. Food debris mixes with bacteria and salivary salts, forming a cement-like substance called calculus, which can be embedded between the teeth. Other causes include dry mouth syndrome (xerostomia) as well as issues within the digestive tract that can send foul-smelling gases into the mouth. Let’s look at a few of these problems and their solutions. Brush (And Rinse) Away Bad Breath For most people, the best way to treat bad breath is through proper brushing, flossing and using a tongue scraper. Since most bad breath bacteria are anaerobic (without oxygen), they die in the presence of oxygen. Brushing your teeth with toothpaste, flossing and then scraping the film off of your tongue are all ways to scrub off bacteria and expose them to oxygen. Mouth rinses such as Listerine, chlorhexidine gluconate and chlorine dioxide are chemical ways to kill the germs that cause bad breath. Alcohols can kill bacteria, and the ingredients in mouth rinses that have eucalyptol, menthol and thymol are all effective ways to reduce bacterial levels. Foods can also cause bad breath. In fact, onion, garlic and certain vegetables contain oils that can remain on your tongue and between your teeth. You can even smell them through the pores in your skin. You can try a breath mint, but most do very little to get rid of these smells after you eat the food. How Else Can I Treat Bad Breath? Here is a rundown of the most common causes, along with steps you can take to kick your bad breath to the Continue reading >>

Breath Odor

Breath Odor

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Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Bad Breath & How To Prevent It?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Bad Breath & How To Prevent It?

If an unpleasant smell escapes from one's mouth, it is known as bad breath. While there are many causes of bad breath, some studies have also found that diabetes can cause bad breath. It is important to know the link between diabetes and bad breath and also learn how to prevent bad breath caused due to diabetes. Halitosis is the clinical name of this problem and being associated with several conditions, bad breath is a sign of something being wrong in your body. Bad breath is a common problem amongst several people and often makes a person feel embarrassed. It is the type of bad breath that indicates something is wrong as different conditions give rise to different kinds of breath. If you are suffering from any kind of problem related to your kidneys then your breath will smell of ammonia but in case of diabetes, a fruity odor will escape your mouth at all times. Also, poor dental and oral hygiene is often the cause of bad breath and this is one of the easiest causes to control and overcome. We will analyze how diabetes causes bad breath and how to prevent it. When severe conditions such as kidney or liver failure or diabetes cause bad breath, it becomes very important to control the main disease as without doing so, one will not be able to get rid of bad breath. In case of diabetes, bad breath occurs when the level of glucose in the blood increases extensively. Here are some circumstances under which diabetes can cause bad breath Increased Number of ketones – Also known as ketoacidosis, it develops when your body, due to lack of insulin, starts burning fat as fuel and not glucose. This in turn increases the production of ketone which is an acid molecule and a waste product in your body. Over time, ketones start accumulating in the urine and blood and with excess accu Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Bad Breath – What Is The Correlation?

Diabetes And Bad Breath – What Is The Correlation?

Diabetes and bad breath have a strong, established correlation. Diabetes sufferers will experience bad breath from time to time, and halitosis is actually a symptom of the disease. Even in people who do not have diabetes and bad breath, when sugar levels are too high or too low, the breath can smell a bit off. This is because sugar stops the body from adequately processing nutrients in the body, and sugar also takes on a different scent after it has dried. According to disturbing new findings from the National Institutes of Health and the CDC, as many as a third of Americans with type 2 diabetes don’t even know they have the illness Even more frightening, one in three adults in the US either has diabetes or a pre-diabetes disorder known as impaired glucose tolerance. Catherine Cowie, PhD, of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, says that this means that 73 million Americans either have the disease or are on their way to getting it. There is a universally held association between diabetes and bad breath, though the breath odor directly attributable to diabetes is not the same as halitosis in its normal sense. Frequently described as a “sweet” or “fruity” smell, diabetics experience an abnormal odor on the breath when they are suffering from ketoacidosis. The breath odor problem is trivial compared to the health hazard posed by the escalating acidity in the blood when ketoacidosis is present in adults or children. Many diabetics also subscribe to low-carb diets as a way to control their blood sugar levels. An unfortunate side effect of these diets is halitosis, caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. Like ketoacidosis, this side effect is not an oral hygiene problem, so all the brushing, Continue reading >>

What Causes Bad Breath And How Can It Be Avoided?

What Causes Bad Breath And How Can It Be Avoided?

Bad breath can be very embarrassing, but it is a common condition and there are numerous ways to fight it. The main source of bad breath is the ‘’tongue’’. The Layers of bacteria get embedded on it, resulting in foul-smelling. CAUSES a) Dry mouth it occurs naturally during sleep, but can also be caused by a glandular condition, as well as certain foods, like onions or garlic, tobacco and alcohol. b) Post nasal drip can also cause bad breath because bacteria are attracted to the resulting mucus and phlegm. c) Poor dental hygiene: If you don't brush,the food particles remain in your mouth, causing bad breath. A colourless, sticky film of bacteria forms on your teeth. If not brushed away, plaque can irritate your gums and Your tongue also can trap bacteria that produce odours. d) Infections in your mouth. Bad breath can be caused by surgical wounds after oral surgery, such as tooth removal, or as a result of tooth decay, gum disease or mouth sores. How to cure Home Remedies: Following these tips can help you fight bad breath: a) Practice good oral hygiene and keep mouth, tongue, teeth and gums clean and healthy. Brush and floss your teeth regularly and clean your gums to remove bacterial buildup. b) Chew some leaves of parsley after eating , a green plant compound that kills bacteria causing odour, also chewing unripe guava or guava leaves is an excellent tonic for the teeth and gums. c) Use natural oils with your toothpaste such as tea tree or peppermint while brushing, cardamom seeds and fenugreek seeds can also help sweeten your breath. If you have chronic dry mouth or you taking some medications that causes bad odour then you should definitely consult a dentist. Future preventive measures: a) Keep sucking daily a piece of sugarless candy or chew sugarless gum t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Bad Breath (halitosis): Causes And Cures

Bad Breath (halitosis): Causes And Cures

Bad breath, medically known as halitosis, occurs when decaying food particles or other debris accumulate in the mouth and are consumed by the bacteria normally present in the mouth to produce an unpleasant odor. Another possible cause of bad breath is nasal discharge or mucus, which can accumulate at the back of the throat, promoting the growth of bacteria and producing foul breath. In addition, certain foods and beverages, such as onion, garlic, alcohol or coffee, when digested, release a distinctive odor from the lungs to the breath as a person exhales. This continues until the molecular components of these products have been completely eliminated from the body. Bad breath (halitosis) is very common, affecting almost one third of the population. In many people it occurs upon waking in the morning. This is caused by a decrease of saliva in the mouth during sleep, which helps to rid the mouth of decaying food particles, dead cells and bacteria that normally accumulate there. Most of the time, bad breath is a temporary problem and it is resolved when saliva production is restored in the morning, or when certain foods or beverages exit the body, or when foul breath caused by poor dental hygiene is professionally treated. However, bad breath can also be chronic and can signal an underlying medical condition. Sometimes, a person believes they have foul breath though the odor cannot be detected by anyone else. This may indicate a psychological problem called pseudo-halitosis. Potential Causes of Bad Breath In most cases, bad breath is caused by bacteria naturally occurring in the mouth, creating a foul-smelling odor in response to the presence of food particles or dead cells in the mouth. A lack of saliva and poor dental hygiene exacerbate this problem. The most common cause Continue reading >>

6 Diseases That Cause Bad Breath

6 Diseases That Cause Bad Breath

Causes of halitosis are widely varied and include everything from dry mouth to eating onions. Patients may not realize that certain diseases are responsible for causing bad breath as well. From respiratory tract infections to diabetes, many well-known medical conditions also play a role in causing bad breath. Once you understand the ways that each of these ailments affect the body, it will be easy to pinpoint the cause of halitosis. 1. Pneumonia Often thought of as a more serious version of the flu, pneumonia is a potentially lethal disease. Caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi, pneumonia spans a vast range of severity. While it may just mean a few days home sick for a healthy adult, to young children or the elderly, pneumonia can be fatal. How Does It Cause Halitosis? Essentially, pneumonia involves air sacs in the lungs that become inflamed. The air sacs become filled up with phlegm or pus, both of which are odiferous when coughed up. The constant coughing up of phlegm or pus takes a toll on the patient’s breath, ultimately causing halitosis. Other respiratory tract infections that can cause bad breath include bronchitis, sinusitis and even a common cold. 2. Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease characterized by an addition to alcohol, often to the point where it’s detrimental to the patient’s health. The negative effects of alcoholism on the body are many and widely varied. In addition to symptoms that affect every aspect of the sufferer’s life, alcoholism is a common cause of halitosis. How Does It Cause Halitosis? There are 3 primary ways that alcohol is known to cause halitosis. Each of these causes is summarized below. Drying Out The Mouth Excessive consumption of alcohol dries out the mouth and discourages the production of saliva. This creates a fertile br Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Halitosis

Can Diabetes Cause Halitosis

There are numerous causes for bad breath, and you may have to talk to your doctor concerning the reasons that you may be experiencing bad breath, and are incapable of getting rid of it. Diabetes is one of the main reasons for bad breath halitosis, but most people don't realize it, and many people don't realize that this problem is very simple to fix. Individuals with halitosis and diabetes have to continually be watchful of their blood sugar, and the primary way to make sure that blood sugars are kept at a healthy level is to maintain a healthy diet. Since the body does not produce insulin in people with diabetes, eating foods that are high in artificial sugars is definitely not a good idea. google_ad_layout="in-article";google_ad_format="482x121";google_ad_client="ca-pub-0933858739464409";google_ad_slot="4476998658";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_ad_width=482;google_ad_height=121;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=11;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["368226201","21061122","191880501"],"loeids":["368226211"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=false;google_ad_unit_key="1554298510";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="3484589445";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=2;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_1";google_start_time=1514540138843;google_pub_vars="JTdCJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2xheW91dCUyMiUzQSUyMmluLWFydGljbGUlMjIlMkMlMjJnb29nbGVfYWRfZm9ybWF0JTIyJTNBJTIyNDgyeDEyMSUyMiUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZF9jbGllbnQlMjIlM0ElMjJjYS1wdWItMDkzMzg1ODczOTQ2NDQwOSUyMiUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZF9zbG90JTIyJTNBJTIyNDQ3Njk5ODY1OCUyMiUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZHNieWdvb2dsZV9zdGF0dXMlMjIlM0ElMjJkb25lJTIyJTJDJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX3dpZHRoJTIyJTNBNDgyJTJDJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2hlaWdodCUyMiUzQTEyMSUyQyUyMmdvb2dsZV9hZF9yZXNpemFibGUlMjIlM Continue reading >>

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