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Does Keto Work For Everyone

In Ketosis But Not Losing Weight? These Foods May Be Stalling Your Progress

In Ketosis But Not Losing Weight? These Foods May Be Stalling Your Progress

Stop Stalling Volume Two: Malignant Mouthfuls Welcome back to the Stop Stalling series! Today, we’re going to take a look at some specific foods that may be causing your stall. These foods may be keeping you from getting ahead. The bad news is that a lot of them may be staples for you. Many of them seem keto-friendly: they’re low in net carbs and should be “safe.” In fact, they are “safe” for plenty of people. However, for some people, certain foods can cause stalls. If you’re in ketosis but not losing weight and have implemented everything advised in Volume 1: Operator Error, here’s a list of the most likely suspects. Dairy: Dairy is a tricky one. First of all, it’s very energy-dense (i.e. it has a lot of calories). That means that it can be really easy to overdo. Alas, keto isn’t magical, and calories still count. Secondly, it’s often a carbohydrate bomb. A glass of milk has about ten grams. It can have more or less depending on the fat content. It can be tough to tell with yogurt: while the actual carb count is probably lower than what is listed on the label (fermentation consumes some of the carbohydrates), you can’t always tell just how many there are. This is even ignoring the fact that many yogurts contain additives, including starch-based thickeners. Finally, dairy is especially prone to “rounding down”: even though many labels say that a serving of cheese contains zero carbohydrates, chances are that a serving contains as many as 0.7 grams. It seems like very little, but if you eat two servings (easy to do!), it’s going to add up over time. Many people rely on dairy, and when they drop it, they start losing again. Seeds and nuts: Seeds and nuts are horrible bastards. I love nuts, especially almonds. Especially the smoked ones or th Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

A Dietitian Explains Why Everyone Thinks The Keto Diet Is So Dangerous.

A Dietitian Explains Why Everyone Thinks The Keto Diet Is So Dangerous.

I want to preface this by saying that I’ve been an accredited practicing dietitian for over a decade. I’ve worked with everyday people through my practice on the Mornington Peninsula for both general weight loss, as well as within hospitals and bariatric clinics to help weight loss patients. I’ve now brought this expertise to the weight-loss industry as co-founder of Be Fit Food, a whole-food based weight-loss meal delivery program. With all this in mind my advice below won’t suit everyone. But that’s the nature of the game in health as it is all about the individual, and seeing that I don’t have the medical history of all those that will read this article, I can’t say that it will work the same for everyone. It’s not for everyone. I’m know how cliché this sounds, but everyone is different so what works for one may not work for the next. This is true for a ketogenic diet and some people will hear the term and want to know more, while others may see it as nothing more than another ‘trending’ diet. I’d like people to look at it and apply the same individualistic thinking that we attribute to people’s health; that ketosis might be different for everyone and it’s allowed to be. Listen: Journalist Brigid Delaney tackled the ‘wellness’ cult and came out the other side. She talks to Mia Freedman, on No Filter. Post continues after audio. It’s not what it used to be. Traditionally, ketogenic diets were quite unbalanced and were based more in a medical setting than in a weight loss setting for treating conditions such as Epilepsy and Type 1 Diabetes. You can imagine that to treat medical conditions such as these the diets were extreme and this is why I think people still treat the modern day version with apprehension. The new age approach to a Continue reading >>

Pruvit Keto Os Review

Pruvit Keto Os Review

We wanted to get to the bottom of things with Keto OS. Right off the bat there was an outpouring of negative reviews on taste, making our team jump straight into the ingredients. Then we noticed a rash of comments about side effects, which was enough to make us tackle the science head on. We took the information we found, summarized it, and now share with you – the truth about Keto OS. What is Keto OS? Pruvit Keto OS supplement is a powdered drink offering weight-loss support. If this drink is as terrible as some of the customer comments make it out to be, we have a hard time believing that anyone is seeing results. Before we get into the ingredients, according to the company itself, they can cause side effects. “Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores.” And that wasn’t all. Before we get ahead of ourselves, here are the Keto OS ingredients: MCT Powder Beta-Hydroxybutyrate Stevia Keto OS Max offers the same, but l-leucine, l-taurine, and a few others are added. Just one scoop or packet a day is supposed to force you into ketosis [2], so your body burns fat instead of carbs. This idea is what low-carb diets are based on. Ketosis is not to be confused with ketoacidosis, a medical condition that can be life-threatening. Pruvit, the makers of Keto OS, started online in 2013. You have various options to choose from on the official website including a canister of powder or prepackaged servings, which makes the Keto OS diet plan a bit easier. We like the addition of caffeine but that’s not the best part. Pruvit Keto OS Competitors Product Price Review Ketopia read Ketocana read Thrive Patch read Shakeology read Burn HD (Sample offer) read Other similar produ Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up And Read Further

Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up And Read Further

The ketogenic diet is not only known to be one of the most effective weight loss tools, but has proven to have many health benefits. Ketosis is a state at which your body produces ketones in the liver, shifting the body's metabolism away from glucose and towards fat utilization. Unless you can check your blood ketones, using Ketostix is an easy way to detect urinary ketones. It's not the most accurate method, but may be good enough to find out whether you are in ketosis. In some cases, weight loss may be difficult even on a low-carb ketogenic diet and there may be a few possible reasons for weight stalling, which I have listed in this post. If you want to know more about the ketogenic diet and how it can help you lose weight, have a look at my Practical Guide to Keto Diet which is freely available on my website also as PDF. 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week Top Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight on a Keto Diet 1. Carbs are Too High Your carbohydrate intake may be too high. Try to decrease your daily carbs limit. Also try to include coconut oil in your diet. Coconut oil consists of MCTs (Medium chain triglycerides), which are easily digestible, less likely to be stored by your body and are used for immediate energy. MCTs are converted in the liver into ketones, which helps you enter ketosis. If you want to know more about carbs, check out this post. For more about ketones, have a look at this post. 2. Protein is Too High or Too Low Your protein intake may be too high/ low. Protein is the most sating macronutrient and you should include high-quality animal protein in your diet. If you don't eat enough protein, you Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Women?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Women?

There are three things you should never ask a woman: How old are you? Are you pregnant? Do you eat carbs? If you’re a woman, what emotions come up for you when you read that last question? For some women, carbs are associated with their sense of morals, feeling proud if they restrict carbs and guilty if they indulge. Others can’t imagine giving up their daily bread, morning oats, fresh fruit, quinoa salad, or baked sweet potato. The Carbohydrate Conundrum Ever since the Atkins’ Diet first launched in 1972 and re-vamped in 1992, the “low-carb” kick has been part of headline news stories and put low-fat, whole-grain, granola-heads to the test. In recent years, the ketogenic diet of the 1920s has become popular, claiming humans were designed to consume fat as their primary fuel, shunning the mere thought of a sushi roll with rice or pre-workout banana. A typical ketogenic prescription includes a daily plate comprised of 60-70% fat, 20-30% protein, and 10-20% carbohydrate. While the low-carb diet has its critics, research shows convincing claims that ketogenic diets are beneficial, not only for weight loss, but also: With all these benefits, “going ketogenic” seems to be the answer to the diet our society has been looking for: health, brain power, and lean body mass. So what’s the downside? The goal of this article is not to argue whether ketogenic diets are good or bad, but rather is a full-scope look at the benefits and downsides to a ketogenic diet—namely for women. So, if you’re a woman, read on. Low-Carb for Life? A low-carb ketogenic approach can work for fat loss. If you cut out excess sugar and starch, which retain water and stores as fat when overconsumed, your body will naturally make positive body composition adjustments, and as an added bonus Continue reading >>

Keto 201

Keto 201

Living with a Ketogenic Diet In my opinion, unless there is a medical issue you are using ketogenic to address, ketogenic eating is best done as a medium-term plan. I do not see it as a way of eating/living forever, mostly because of quality of life issues. Being a fat and oil monster gets old and I think keto is best used as a lever to accomplish a goal, after which a more sustainable, balanced, and enjoyable way of eating is adopted. During the medium-term of eating this way, though, there can be a lot of potential problems that need to be solved. Ketogenic eating, at least in my experience, has made me face several other issues around health and eating that I simply wasn’t aware of before. Almost like as soon as I cleaned up how I was eating there was nowhere left for other issues that I had to hide. Over the course of living with the ketogenic diet, one of the best attitudes you can adopt is one of flexible determination. You don’t want to be so rigid that you require certain weight loss every week, or that you make yourself crazy micromanaging your life. All eating strategies work because improved behavior is applied over a long period of time. Your weight may fluctuate up, down, and stay the same, but what we are all going for with keto is an overall loss, and that just takes time. Food Sensitivities: When Food Attacks One of the interesting things about eating keto is how it can make you face chronic food sensitivity issues. Perhaps it is that you feel so much better on keto, that feeling bad because of food feels worse and is, thus, more obvious. Or, maybe it is because through cleaning up your diet your body gets more tuned and thus any defects are more obvious. Whatever the case, ketogenic eating can unearth and make people face sometimes uncomfortable, or Continue reading >>

Does Ketogenic Diet Work For Everyone?

Does Ketogenic Diet Work For Everyone?

A high protein diet has many advantages. Not only can it help you achieve your weight loss and fitness goals, it can actually provide a number of health benefits along the way. That being said, you should consult with your health practitioner before making any significant lifestyle changes. We decided to find out the answer to a simple question, does ketogenic diet work for everyone? Is it really helpful to any kind of health issue out there? Let’s see how it turned out: Diabetics Patients of type-1 diabetes, gestational diabetes and hypoglycemia should not go for a ketogenic diet. The keto-diet only works for type-2 diabetes as it is relatively easier to manage the high amounts of insulin by reducing sugar-loaded food items. Pregnant or Nursing Women As with all other diets and work out routines, you should be extremely careful during pregnancy and nursing. Pregnant women need to have a wide range of food categories in their diet to help promote fetus growth. Sticking to a low-carb diet might cause extremely low energy levels, even resulting in unconsciousness. Liver or pancreatic disease Patients with liver or pancreatic disease should stay clear from the keto-diet. The high amount of acidity caused by ketosis can actually cause more harm in people suffering from these ailments than doing any good. Kidney Issues If you have any form of renal function issue, do not even consider a high-protein diet. You need to increase the amounts of salts and electrolytes in your body because of the loss of these salts during ketosis, but an improper renal function can cause huge problems in regulating the sodium and potassium amounts in the body. People on prescription medicines A considerable change in body functions, while you are trying to maintain ketosis might require a signi Continue reading >>

So You Want To Go Keto

So You Want To Go Keto

When we begin the process of transitioning to a Ketogenic Lifestyle, it might be tempting to look at all the long term progress pictures and forget that those results don’t happen overnight. Pictures we see follow the same rule on Facebook and the internet as icebergs. 10% is on the surface, but 90% of the story is floating underneath. We forget about 90% of the story, but that is the part which will trip us up if we don’t know about it. You might be here transitioning from another eating plan, or on a recommendation. You might have stumbled on this place by “coincidence” (no such thing). No matter where you’ve come here from, or what kind of amazing healthy looking eating plan you have been on before you transition to Keto, it’s important to understand what happens to your body during the time of transition. Unless it’s been a high fat lifestyle, the human body starts out very very confused. It is very, very happy, don’t get me wrong. Imagine this: You have a job, you have been there for 20 years, your boss walks past you every day and doesn’t acknowledge you exist. Suddenly, out of the blue, he comes up to you one day, calls you by name and says, “I really love your work, you always do an amazing job, thank you for being here!” He knows your family, he knows your license number, he starts giving you double your usual pay… You are. Freaked. Out. This is what is happening in our bodies when we start feeding it all this beautiful fat. It gets freaked out. We are giving it what it needs, and extra Christmas bonuses, and it suddenly doesn’t know what to do anymore. In the past it had to work hard to get us through each day, and save up just in case there’s a hard winter. Now all the paradigms are different and it takes time to trust whether we w Continue reading >>

Does Everyone Need To Be On A Ketogenic Diet Or Not?

Does Everyone Need To Be On A Ketogenic Diet Or Not?

0 0 This past week I got to catch up with the incredible Dr Jason Fung whilst he was in London visiting. For those of you who do not know Dr Fung, he is the incredible Nephrologist that is based in Toronto Canada and who has been pioneering with is work in the fasting space, closely linked with the ketogenic diet. I first met Jason whilst I was in Cape Town South Africa and when I heard that he sometimes put his patients on a 30 day fast, I knew I would have to see this for myself. As part of my world trip, I was lucky to be able to head to Toronto and shadow with Jason and his colleagues to see exactly how he got his patients fasting. This post isn’t about fasting (just yet), but more around the topic on who should be following a ketogenic diet. Whilst waiting together for another breakfast meeting, myself and Jason got onto the topic of “should everyone be following a ketogenic diet?” Both of us have the similar viewpoint on this in that no, not everyone should or even needs to be following a ketogenic approach. When is it Appropriate? The ketogenic approach is gaining a huge amount of momentum and interest as it gets into mainstream media. I think it is important that we don’t let the idea run away that for a diet like that to work, that you need to be strict keto. And what does ketogenic even mean? If you look on social media or talk to anyone that is following a ketogenic approach there are different interpretations of the diet. Those that are incredibly fit can appear to eat upwards of 100g of carbs and still be ketogenic. Yet there are those who are highly insulin resistant and cannot eat above 20g of carbohydrates. Likewise, there are many people that do not follow the strict ketogenic principles. Instead adopting more of a low carbohydrate approach and Continue reading >>

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

If you're looking for the trendiest diet since Paleo, this might be it—only with more fat, way less protein, and virtually zero carbs. The ketogenic diet, which has reportedly been used by celebs like Kim Kardashian and NBA player Lebron James, is a high-fat, low-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that was originally developed to treat epilepsy in children (experts can't say for sure why it reduces the frequency of seizures, but it does seem to work). The whole diet is based on a process called ketosis, which is when your body is so depleted of carbs that your liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies, which can be used as energy, says Tracy A. Siegfried, M.D., medical director at The N.E.W. Program, a bariatric and metabolic weight-loss center in California. The ketones replace carbohydrates as your body’s main energy source, meaning you are running on (and burning) fat. To tell if your body is in a state of ketosis, you can measure your blood or urine for elevated levels of ketones (Ketostix, used to test keto-dieters ketone levels, are available at many pharmacies). If this sounds familiar, it's probably because ketosis is also the goal of the first stage of the Atkins diet. But unlike the keto diet, the Atkins diet aims to get you into a mild state of ketosis and allows for more carbohydrates. In other words, keto is more hardcore. So What the Heck Do You Eat? To get your body to reach ketosis, 80 to 90 percent of the calories you consume should come from fat, and the rest should come from a combo of protein and carbs, says Siegfried. Plus, your carb intake is limited to 10 to 35 grams per day. That's roughly the amount in a single apple, glass of milk, or piece of bread. In fact, it's pretty much impossible to eat fruit or milk-based products without su Continue reading >>

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

These are the top 10 reasons you’re not losing weight on a low carb diet. A great FREE printable for the fridge and an easy reminder to stay on track. Just click on the image below to save the PDF for printing. UPDATE – watch the quick video below. No compatible source was found for this media. Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight Eating LCHF Too Many Carbohydrates – are carbs starting to sneak back into your diet? Be honest and start tracking everything using KetoDietApp. A little treat here and there adds up. Some are more carb sensitive (or insulin resistant) than others. I know that my carbs have to be around 50g/day to be feeling great and in control of my appetite. Lower than that and I will lose a little bit of weight, above that and I know my weight loss will stall. I generally go between 35-70g/day without too much tracking because I have done it for so long. Too Much Fruit – yes I use berries on my breakfast and desserts, but that is it. I allow my children to eat fruit (without gorging) as they are fit, healthy and in the normal weight range. For me, the sugar and fructose in fruit is too much. Sure, enjoy it as a treat and eat only low carb nutritent dense berries. See fruit as an occasional sweet treat. Packed with fibre, antioxidants, nutrients……… “If you are overweight, fruit is not your friend” Too much Dairy – my biggest downfall is milk. I love my lattes and flat whites. Now milk is great, full of protein and calcium, but it also contains about 5% carbs. A latte can range from 9g to 15g carbs depending on the size you choose. Most dairy such as milk, cream and yoghurt contains approximately 4- 5% but you are more likely to drink a large glass of milk, eat a bowl of yoghurt or drink a large latte than eat 250g of full fat cheese Continue reading >>

Switching From Low-carb Or Keto To Paleo

Switching From Low-carb Or Keto To Paleo

Disclaimer: some people do perfectly fine on very low-carb or ketogenic diets for years and years. If that’s you, great! But if that’s not you, then you might find something useful here. Frustrated by low-carb? Did it stop working for you, or maybe you’re just tired of the intense restriction on everything from carrots to kale? It might be time to try a different tack: instead of focusing only on carbs, try a more rounded Paleo approach. What’s the Difference? On a low-carb diet, the goal is exactly that: to minimize carbs, usually for the purpose of weight loss (although sometimes it’s for other reasons – for example, people who try a ketogenic diet to control epilepsy). On a Paleo diet, the goal is to make appropriate nutritional choices considering your evolutionary history. You can do a low-carb version of Paleo, but just cutting carbs does not automatically make a diet Paleo, and Paleo is about a whole set of food choices, not just carbs. Here’s a chart comparing some key differences: Generic low-carb/keto Paleo Carbohydrate level Low Variable; low to medium. Ultimate goal Typically weight loss (although there are exceptions) Better health (sometimes this includes weight loss) Is soy sauce (containing wheat) allowed? Yes, since the tiny amount of carbohydrate is negligible. No, since wheat is a gut irritant. Is canola oil (containing lots of Omega-6 fats) allowed? Yes, since it has no carbs. No, since Omega-6 fats are inflammatory and unhealthy. Are sweet potatoes (containing significant amounts of carbohydrate) allowed? No, since they have carbs. Yes, since they are full of nutrients and do not contain any toxins or gut irritants. Is tofu (containing soy) allowed? Yes, since it has few carbs. No; soy is full of inflammatory Omega-6 fats and other pro Continue reading >>

Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

I may receive a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. Full disclosure here. Ketogenic diets are all the rage right now, unless you’re reading this in 2027, in which case, ketogenic diets were all the rage in 2017. My clients and even friends are starting to ask me about “going keto,” because they’ve heard it will help them lose weight, improve athletic ability, boost brain power, and achieve overall unicorn health status. A quick search turns up multiple headlines claiming a ketogenic diet can reverse epilepsy, cancer, diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity and bring one to optimal health. So, is it all that? Is a ketogenic diet right for you, or is it just another fad? What is a Ketogenic Diet? A ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis. Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of dietary carbohydrates (usually below 50g/day), the liver becomes the sole provider of glucose to feed your hungry organs – especially the brain, a particularly greedy entity accounting for ~20% of total energy expenditure. (a great synopsis from Scientific American). Going keto basically means your body switches from burning glucose to fat for fuel. When you follow a ketogenic diet for a while, you enter into nutritional ketosis, which means your liver converts fats to ketones for fuel rather than than body burning glucose directly. A ketogenic diet excludes grains, starch, sugar, and fructose. It’s high fat, moderate protein, and very low in carbohydrates (quick lesson: anything that isn’t a protein or fat is a carb. That means Continue reading >>

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