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Does Keto Help Kidney Stones

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is ketosis safe? The truth is that we can’t say for certain that it is 100% safe. Humans don’t understand everything under the branch of nutritional science and probably won’t for a very long time. As an individual, the only thing you can do is take a look at the research yourself and form your own conclusion. Personally, through the reading I’ve done and the experience I’ve had with the Keto diet, I’ve formed my own conclusion that ketosis is safe. Could I be wrong? Absolutely. But I could also be right. I’m willing to take that risk in order to follow a diet which could maximize longevity, well being and function. My personal conclusion shouldn’t matter to you though. You need to do your own research and come to your own conclusion. I’ve put together this post to organize all of the issues surrounding the safety of ketosis so that you can make your own decision. In trying to prove something to be safe there are two ways to go about it. Disprove the claims of danger Show evidence which may be correlated with safety This article will dispel the top 10 claims people make in an argument to label ketosis as dangerous. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. The following data is not meant to 100% prove or disprove the safety of ketosis. It’s merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional strategy we feel is best for ourselves. I’m not a doctor or a researcher. The following information is material I’ve collected in my attempt to feel confident following a Keto diet indefinitely. Most of it is sourced from doctors or authors although I have also included anecdotal accounts from experiences posted on message boards and Reddit. I know, much of the information here isn’t sourced directly from s Continue reading >>

12 Steps To Prevent Kidney Stones

12 Steps To Prevent Kidney Stones

12 Steps to Prevent Kidney Stones: In this article, you will find several steps to help prevent kidney stones. The pain of kidney stones is one of the worst possible pains one could possibly experience. While the causes behind kidney stones are not fully understood there is some common nutritional advice that can help prevent these stones from forming. Kidney stones come in a number of different forms. Understanding the type of stone is key to preventing it from re-forming. The most common kidney stones are by far calcium oxalate crystals which account for 80% and uric acid crystals which account for another 5-10% (1). The goal of this article is to help you find the best strategies to work with your unique genetic makeup to prevent kidney stones. We will discover the underlying mechanisms behind kidney stone formation and the unique nutrition and lifestyle tips to follow. Fructose and Kidney Stone Formation: Certain foods that are commonly consumed in the United States promote kidney stone formation. High fructose consumption is linked with an increased excretion of calcium, oxalates and uric acid, which are all associated with increased risk of kidney stones. Research has shown that high fructose diets are at greater risk for kidney stone formation (2, 3, 4) Soft drinks with phosphoric acid significantly increase calcium excretion and kidney stone formation (5). Soft drinks and sweet teas are perhaps the biggest dietary causes of kidney stone formation because they often contain high levels of both fructose and phosphoric acid (6) Major Factors With Kidney Stones: Here are 6 major factors often seen with kidney stone formation Dehydration: This causes low urine volume and less fluid to grab up calcium and other compounds in the urinary system. This is the easiest thin Continue reading >>

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. New guidelines recommend people who have had a kidney stone increase their fluid intake so they have at least two liters of urine per day Increasing water consumption could decrease your risk of kidney stone recurrence by at least half By Dr. Mercola In the 1970s, less than 4 percent of Americans had suffered from kidney stones. By the 1990s, this had increased to more than 5 percent. Today, with rates continuing to rise, kidney stones will impact one in 10 US adults at some point during their lives1 -- usually between the ages of 20 and 50. In most cases, kidney stones pass without causing lasting damage, but the pain during passing can be excruciating. Kidney stones are also sometimes associated with lower back pain, stomach pain, nausea or vomiting, fever, and chills. Generally, the larger the stone, the more pain and symptoms it will cause. Sometimes aggressive treatments are needed to clear the stones, and each year, more than half a million people go to US emergency rooms due to kidney stones.2 Once you've had them, your risk of recurrence increases. About 35 percent to 50 percent of people will have another bout with kidney stones within five years unless changes are made.3 What type of changes? According to new guidelines issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP), one of the simplest strategies you can take is to drink more water. Staying Hydrated Lowers Your Risk of Recurrent Kidney Stones The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. If you aren't drinking enough, your urine will have higher concentrations of substances that can precipitate out and form stones. Specifically, stone-forming chemicals include calcium, oxalate, urate, cysteine, xanthine Continue reading >>

10 Side Effects Of Ketosis: The Pitfalls Of A Keto Diet

10 Side Effects Of Ketosis: The Pitfalls Of A Keto Diet

A low-carb, high-fat diet takes your body to a state of ketosis, when it burns fat for energy. Result is you lose weight fast, but mostly by dehydration. As this diet robs you of several vital nutrients, you suffer from constipation, headache, bone erosion, leg cramps, and even disrupted menses. Kidney stones may also be formed due to a rising acidity of the blood. When you follow a diet which drastically restricts the amount of carbs you consume, you will not have enough glucose in your blood to fuel your body. In this situation, your body turns to fats for energy. When your fats are broken down, small molecules called ketone bodies are produced, which act as an alternative source of energy. This condition is known as ketosis, and it is a natural state your body goes into. Since your brain requires a constant supply of energy, it would shut down if your body did not produce this alternative fuel source, but it cannot run on ketones forever. Low-carb diets or ketogenic diets, which help your body get into the state of ketosis, help you lose weight quickly but can adversely affect your overall health. 1. Fatigue When your body is in a state of ketosis, you will experience fatigue as your body has to adjust to using an alternative source of energy apart from glucose. If you work out, your workout routine can suffer. Make sure to consume lots of water and salts when on this diet to fight fatigue and lethargy. 2. Headaches And Anxiety You can experience splitting headaches within a few days when you follow a ketogenic diet. Your brain preferably wants to run on glucose; so it burns the last stores of glucose before switching to ketones for energy. You can feel anxious and find it difficult to concentrate as your brain adjusts to using this alternative energy source. 3. Bad Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Prevent Kidney Stones

9 Ways To Prevent Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are hard mineral deposits that form inside your kidneys. They cause excruciating pain when they pass through your urinary tract. Up to 12 percent of Americans are affected by kidney stones. And once you’ve had one kidney stone, you’re 50 percent more likely to get another within the next 10 years. There’s no one sure way to prevent kidney stones, especially if you have a family history of the condition. A combination of diet and lifestyle changes, as well as some medications, may help reduce your risk. Making small adjustments to your current diet and nutrition plan may go a long way toward preventing kidney stones. 1. Stay hydrated Drinking more water is the best way to prevent kidney stones. If you don’t drink enough, your urine output will be low. Low urine output means your urine is more concentrated and less likely to dissolve urine salts that cause stones. Lemonade and orange juice are also good options. They both contain citrate, which may prevent stones from forming. Try to drink around eight glasses of fluids daily, or enough to pass two liters of urine. If you exercise or sweat a lot, or if you have a history of cystine stones, you’ll need additional fluids. You can tell whether you’re hydrated by looking at the color of your urine — it should be clear or pale yellow. If it’s dark, you need to drink more. 2. Eat more calcium-rich foods The most common type of kidney stone is the calcium oxalate stone, leading many people to believe they should avoid eating calcium. The opposite is true. Low-calcium diets may increase your kidney stone risk and your risk of osteoporosis. Calcium supplements, however, may increase your risk of stones. Taking calcium supplements with a meal may help reduce that risk. Low-fat milk, low-fat cheese, and Continue reading >>

4 Ways Keto Is Different

4 Ways Keto Is Different

With the big splash a certain doctor made in the media years back, most folks nowadays are at least somewhat familiar with a general low-carb approach to eating. In the past thirty to forty years, quite a number of different low-carb diets have been formulated, which begs the question: What makes keto different? Shift in focus The biggest discrepancy between keto and all those other low-carb diets you’ve either read about or tried yourself is that the focus is different. On just about any low-carb way of eating, the main reason for doing it is pretty universally weight loss. That’s not a bad reason to start, as being overweight is comorbid with quite a number of diseases and conditions. Sometimes it’s the cause of the disease, sometimes it’s a side effect. Either way, everyone acknowledges it’s undesirable. But you’ll probably lose weight on keto, so what makes it different? Keto is not really about weight loss. Oh yes, that’s definitely a benefit of following a Ketogenic way of eating, but the overall diet is about good nutrition, internal healing, and helping your body to utilize the most efficient fueling process. When you understand that this is the whole point of eating keto, you will more easily understand the other things that distinguish our protocol. Clean Eating The next factor that makes keto different is that we strive to eat as “clean” as possible. That means minimally processed foods, mostly prepared yourself. So you’re going to eat a lot of fresh meats, vegetables, and dairy, and stay out of the vast majority of packaged foods. The most obvious reason for this is the hidden carb factor. In a nutshell, just about everything you can buy that’s in a package is going to contain sugar or sugar derivatives, starches, and other undesirable Continue reading >>

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Will The Keto Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Once upon a time, fat was the enemy of dieters. Nearly every product on the grocery store shelves had its “low-fat” version. Low-fat dressing. Low-fat cheese. Low-fat chips. Low-fat processed meats. Low-fat cookies. Low-fat freezer meals. It didn’t matter if the food itself was terrible for you and completely devoid of any nutrients (or even real food)… as long as it was “low-fat,” it was marketed as healthy for you. It was the way to lose weight for good. But then science begin to show us that fat wasn’t the enemy after all. In fact, eating plenty of healthy fats was the key to optimal health – and even sustainable weight loss. And today we have a diet rapidly growing in popularity that says, “Not only is fat good for you, you should be eating MOSTLY fat.” That’s right, I’m talking about the keto diet. Discover in just 7 short questions why you may be experiencing painful kidney stones and uncover how to return to your normal life. Take The Kidney Quiz Now! As with any unique diet plan, there are those who believe in it religiously and will “proselytize” to anyone who is listening. Then there are those who adamantly believe it to be dangerous. But one concern that pops up quite frequently from those who are skeptical is kidney stones. Can the keto diet encourage the formation of kidney stones? I’m here to help you examine that question. We’re going to learn more about the keto diet and what it does to your body. Then we are going to look at the science behind kidney stones and high-fat/low-carb dieting to see if the keto diet should be embraced or avoided if you suffer from kidney stones. What Is The Keto Diet? Though trendy now, the keto diet is not a new thing. It’s actually been around since the 1920s. In simple terms, the keto diet Continue reading >>

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. These programs generally recommend that dieters get 30% to 50% of their total calories from protein. By comparison, the American Heart Association, the National Cholesterol Education Program, and the American Cancer Society all recommend a diet in which a smaller percentage of calories come from protein. Normally your body burns carbohydrates for fuel. When you drastically cut carbs, the body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, and it begins to burn its own fat for fuel. When your fat stores become a primary energy source, you may lose weight. Some experts have raised concern about high-protein, low-carb diets. High cholesterol.Some protein sources -- like fatty cuts of meat, whole dairy products, and other high-fat foods -- can raise cholesterol, increasing your chance of heart disease. However, studies showed that people on the Atkins diet for up to 2 years actually had decreased “bad” cholesterol levels. Kidney problems. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys. This could worsen kidney function. Osteoporosis and kidney stones. When you're on a high-protein diet, you may urinate more calcium than normal. There are conflicting reports, but some experts think this could make osteoporosis and kidney stones more likely. If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables, and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

The ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketotic, and only for a brief portion of the program. It has not been associated with kidney damage or disease in individuals who have normally functioning kidneys. Concerns regarding undue stress on the kidneys are often aimed at very low carbohydrate, very high protein ketogenic diets. Few studies have shown any actual damage, however. (Note: Although the Weight Loss portion of the ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketogenic, it is not considered to be exceptionally “high protein” for most individuals.) Dietary ketosis is among the most maligned and misunderstood concepts in nutrition medicine. Particularly among researchers who don’t actually treat patients, ketosis (the presence of ketone bodies in the urine) is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening build-up of ketone bodies due to muscle wasting and dehydration as in states of shock or uncontrolled Type 1 diabetes. In the Type 1 diabetic, the absence of insulin leads to a toxic build-up of blood glucose and an extreme break-down of fat and muscle tissue. This condition doesn’t occur in individuals who have even a small amount of insulin, whether from natural production or artificially administered. Whereas patients in ketoacidosis are closely monitored in Intensive Care Units, individuals in ketosis are amongst the healthy, active population. Dietary ketosis is a natural adjustment to the body’s reduced intake of carbohydrates as the body shifts its primary source of energy from carbohydrates to stored fat. The presence of insulin keeps ketone production in check so that a mild, beneficial ketosis is achieved. Blood glucose levels are stabilized within a normal range and there is no break-down of healthy muscle tissue. It would be diffi Continue reading >>

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

Clearing Up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

It’s funny how our mental state really affects how we write and what we are interested in. When I wrote the introduction to this piece I was just getting settled into our new place in Santa Fe, NM and was looking at over a month at home to work and write. Then a number of wacky events happened and I’ve been home about 7 days out of the last month and I’ve only made it about 70 pages into Kon-Tiki. Ouch. Now I’m home for 8 days and will then be gone for a project that will take me completely off the grid for nearly 3 weeks. No phone, email…nada. When I sat down to do this kidney piece it was with a mindset that I had a ton of time and could really sink my teeth into it. Now I’m time crunched and anxious that I will get it done at all! Up front here I’d like to thank Mat “The Kraken” Lalonde with his help on some literature for this piece. Any inaccuracies however are my own tomfoolery. If I wanted to cut to the chase I could boil this whole thing down to the following: 1-Dietary protein DOES NOT CAUSE KIDNEY DAMAGE. 2-Chronically elevated BLOOD GLUCOSE levels DO cause kidney damage. 3-Dietary fructose REALLY causes kidney damage. 4-Many kidney issues have either a hyperinsulinemic characteristic, an autoimmune characteristic, and or a combination of autoimmunity or hyperinsulinism. A standard, low-ish carb paleo diet can fix most of these issues. 5-For serious kidney damage a low-protein, ketogenic diet can be remarkably therapeutic. 6-If you get kidney stones that are from oxalates, reduce your green veggie intake (spinach for example) and have other types of veggies. 7-If you get kidney stones that are from urate salts, you are likely NOT following a low-ish carb paleo diet, you likely have insulin resistance and your liver is not processing uric acid Continue reading >>

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

Today we officially kickoff this brand new podcast dedicated to answering listeners questions about the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet. It’s called Keto Talk with Jimmy Moore & The Doc (now available to listen and subscribe on iTunes) featuring 10-year veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles.” These two are a keto power pair ready to take on your most pressing questions about this way of eating. KEY QUOTE: “If you cheat on your ketogenic diet, then you are at risk of a kidney stone or gout. The point is if you’re gonna cheat, you’re gonna pay for it.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 1: – The beginning of this new podcast devoted to keto – How Adam uses ketogenic diets with his patients – Adam’s father who died early from diabetes issues – Follow Jimmy and Adam on Periscope – Whether keto creates or prevents kidney stones – Why it’s not a good idea to cheat on your low-carb diet – How cheating, not keto, is what leads to gout – Whether a ketogenic diet causes heart palpitations – How to best balance your electrolytes starting keto – The problem with caffeine on your cortisol levels WORLD’S 1ST REUSABLE BREATH KETONE ANALYZER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipTHE WORLD’S FIRST EXOGENOUS KETONES SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipLINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 1 – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Get the 2015 Ketonix breath ketone analyzer from Ketonix.com – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Try the KETO//OS exogenous ketones supplement – Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” – Dr. Adam Nally, DO from DocMuscles.com – Jimmy Moore on Periscope Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Is A Natural Treatment For The Symptoms Of Gout

The Ketogenic Diet Is A Natural Treatment For The Symptoms Of Gout

A new study published in the journal Cell Reports suggests that a ketogenic (high fat, low carb) diet may be helpful in treating the symptoms of gout. Gout is something that plagues more and more people every day, and it’s caused from uric acid buildup in the body. What is Gout? Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops in some people who have high levels of uric acid in the blood. The acid can form needle-like crystals in a joint and cause sudden, severe episodes of pain, tenderness, redness, warmth and swelling Uric acid, a normal byproduct of metabolic processes, is typically dissolved in the blood and then excreted from the body through the urine. However, when the body is unable to properly break down uric acid, blood levels rise, and the excess is deposited in bodily tissues. When uric acid accumulates around the joints it is known as “tophi,” and can manifest as jelly like lumps under the skin. When uric acid crystals collect in the kidneys, it can result in kidney stones. The Role Of a Ketogenic Diet Ketogenic diet may protect against gout. … It is caused by either an excessive production or insufficient excretion of uric acid. In gout, the uric acid crystals sediment in tissues and fluids, triggering the body’s immune cells. Recent research out of the laboratory of Vishwa Deep Dixit, professor of comparative medicine and immunobiology at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, suggests that symptoms of gout may be managed with a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets are typically implemented for weight loss, or to treat childhood epilepsy. The diet involves a significant reduction of carbohydrate intake favoring moderate protein and high fat foods. This starves the central nervous system of glucose and prompts the liver to metabolise fats pro Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

There are many symptoms and adverse effects reported by study groups on low carbohydrate diets such as the ketogenic diet. The main ketogenic diet symptoms are: headache, dizziness, presence of diarrhea and constipation, weakness, loss of concentration, bad breath, low blood pressure, increased heart rate, among many others. According to Dr. Mauro DiPasquale, a respected member of the international sports community as an athlete, administrator and physician, and author of the famous book “The Anabolic Diet”, he originally created this diet for bodybuilders and athletes, but since then he has developed other versions for the general public. This is a very interesting article about ketogenic diet from ncbi. about “Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients”. He says that in the first week of the ketogenic diet the body is going through the metabolic shift from being a carb and muscle-burning machine to being a fat burner, and that can be very difficult. This is called the induction phase and people may have some symptoms including lethargy, dizziness, mental fogginess, irritability, and irregular bowels, depending on how your body reacts to the radical shift in macronutrients. Some people will suffer few symptoms, others will be very affected. Your energy can also drop and there might be a frequent feeling of you being hungry. That’s because the body is going through a readjustment phase. Due to the low amount of nutrients, especially vitamins and minerals, may also occur weakening of the immune system, leaving the body more susceptible to several infections. So, the discipline and persistence during the first week of the ketogenic diet is very important to experience the benefits later. The energy will come back and you will feel better. This will Continue reading >>

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

The use of exogenous ketones is a new and novel technology. So the safety profile of a ketone supplement like KETO//OS begins to emerge as more research is being done. Often people are concerned about kidney or liver health when it comes to exogenous ketones. What the studies are actually finding, is that ketones, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is actually beneficial to the health of our liver and kidneys. There are also many other benefits of taking ketones as well. The risk of kidney stones can be a concern, as we know there is a small risk from a ketogenic diet standpoint. However, potassium supplementation decreases that risk of getting kidney stones substantially. Exogenous ketone and potassium supplementation while following a ketogenic diet, is an effective combination. To learn more about, and order exogenous ketones, go to the Prüvit online store. Continue reading >>

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