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Does Black Coffee Prevent Ketosis

What It’s Like To Drink Bulletproof Coffee Every Morning For Two Weeks

What It’s Like To Drink Bulletproof Coffee Every Morning For Two Weeks

Separately those ingredients don’t exactly tick all the traditional boxes for a balanced breakfast. But together they are the three components you need to make Bulletproof coffee, a frothy, energy-igniting beverage that has surged in recent years to become the toast of Silicon Valley. Its promises are multitude, at least according to its creator, cloud-computing pioneer and “Bulletproof Executive” Dave Asprey, who refined his recipe after trying a tea made with yak-butter in Nepal. Among Bulletproof coffee’s listed benefits: It triggers weight loss by way of ketosis, a metabolic state triggered by a lack of carbs that kicks fat-burning into overdrive; it kills pesky cravings; and it boosts cognitive function, mainlining a shining dose of mental clarity into your foggy morning skull. Maybe it would even fold my laundry. Related: I’m The Guy Who Created Bulletproof Coffee—This Is My Morning Routine Most of all, though, Bulletproof coffee is intended to be efficient, an easy way for the biohacking crowd to slurp down fats and calories (460 of them!) without so much as sniffing a processed carbohydrate. Why eat a muffin that goes straight to your muffin top, the thinking goes, when you could drink down the metabolic equivalent of supercharged battery acid every morning? I was curious. I wondered: Is Bulletproof coffee a hyper-efficient, power-packed breakfast taken to its logical end? Or is butter-coffee something more insidious, the latest in a long line of snake oils intended to charm overwhelmed customers looking for the next big diet shortcut? To find out, I recently gave up breakfast for two weeks and decided to dive headfirst into the (dark, mysterious, hot) Bulletproof hoopla. My goal was to assess a few things: How did I feel by lunch time every day? Did Continue reading >>

What Coffee & Caffeine Do To You When Fasting

What Coffee & Caffeine Do To You When Fasting

This “light snack” from Azerbaijan might be just the ticket for a person coming off of a fast for medical, physical, religious or political reasons. (Wikimedia Commons photo/Emin Bashirov) Caffeine and fasting are controversial in some circles. Is it truly fasting if you have coffee or other liquids during your time of abstaining from eating? Some people say to be a pure fast, one must drink only water and eat nothing. Others maintain that having coffee and/or other liquids is healthier and ensures you don’t become dehydrated. In an article on Mercola.com by Steve Kamb, he says it’s OK to drink any zero-calorie beverages during an intermittent fasting routine. “Zero-calorie beverages are okay,” he writes. “As previously stated, I drink green tea in the morning for my caffeine kick while writing. If you want to drink water, black coffee, or tea during your fasting period, that’s okay. Remember, don’t overthink it – keep things simple! Track your results, listen to your body.” Ancient practice People fast for various reasons, including religious, physical or medical ones. You’ve heard of the Hippocratic Oath that requires medical practitioners to act ethically? The oath dates back to Hippocrates of 4th century BC Greece, who recommended fasting to promote self-healing. Another healer, Paracelsus, of the 16th century in Austria, wrote, “Fasting is the greatest remedy, the physician within.” This may be true especially today with so many food additives, GMOs, high-fat and high-sugar ingredients in our diet. Taking a break from all those substances may help re-set the body’s natural balance, say a number of websites. Remember, do not undertake a fast without the advice of a doctor, especially if you abstain from food for more than a day. Fasting Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Caffeine On Ketosis

The Effects Of Caffeine On Ketosis

Nowadays, it seems as if society as we know it, is becoming more and more obsessed with body image and appearance on a day to day basis. Because of this, we find ourselves constantly trying to watch what we eat, watching our figures, and busting our butts in the gym until we feel physically sick in the process. What generally tends to happen is that when we go from one extreme, I.E eating junk and being lazy, to another, I.E eating healthy, but incredibly low calorie diets and exercising until we feel sick, it comes as quite a shock to the system to begin with, and we lose a fair amount of fat. Sadly, the body quickly adapts to these changes and our progress becomes slower and slower with each passing day. Eventually, we’ll find ourselves eating boring and tasteless food, constantly feeling tired, hungry, and irritable due to the extreme calorie deficit, and struggling to complete even the most basic of workouts. What generally then happens is that we’ll weigh ourselves, and notice that, after weeks of dieting, exercising, and making ourselves miserable in the process, we’ve lost barely any weight, if any weight at all for that matter. We then likely feel discouraged, will throw the towel in, and stuff our faces full of as much junk food as possible, before repeating the entire vicious circle all over again. Now, don’t get us wrong, calorie restrictive diets rich in healthy foods do work, but extreme deficits, and bland tasting foods are not good for the body, or the psyche for that matter. Ketogenic diets however, are quickly becoming popular once more, and it is ketogenic diets we’ll be looking at here, alongside caffeine and how caffeine effects these diets. What is ketosis? Ketogenic diets, such as ‘keto’ and the Atkins diet, are not new concepts, as t Continue reading >>

3 Reasons Why Bulletproof Coffee Is A Bad Idea

3 Reasons Why Bulletproof Coffee Is A Bad Idea

Coffee is awesome. Butter is awesome. Saturated fat is awesome. There is no doubt about it... they have been unfairly demonized. They've been blamed for health problems that they really didn't have anything to do with. Fortunately, the world is slowly but surely abandoning the old diet myths and embracing these foods once again. However... it's important to keep in mind that everything in nutrition depends on dosage and context. Just because a little bit of something is healthy, it doesn't mean that a whole ton of it is healthier, or even safe. This brings us to the topic at hand... a huge trend called Bulletproof coffee. If you don't know what this is, then it is a recipe for a coffee drink that replaces breakfast: 2 cups of coffee. 2 tablespoons (at least) of grass-fed, unsalted butter. 1-2 tablespoons of MCT oil. All mixed in a blender. This is promoted by Dave Asprey, the man behind the website Bulletproof Executive. Bulletproof coffee has become so popular that people all over the world have either heard about it or tried it. This includes several people I know in real life, people that are not in any way involved in the paleo or low-carb communities. For the record, I'm a big fan of grass-fed butter, saturated fat and coffee... separately... in "normal" amounts. I've written about all of them before and include them in my diet, every day. However... I do not think it is a good idea to consume unnaturally large doses of them. Some is good, even downright healthy, but too much could very well be a problem. Although I'm sure bulletproof coffee is tasty and can boost energy levels (especially for someone on a ketogenic diet), I do think there are some genuine concerns that should be noted. For the sake of clarity, what this article is about is the act of replacing you Continue reading >>

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

Note: Please note that if you are interested in a Ketogenic Diet used to treat Epilepsy or Pediatric Epilepsy, please start at Johns Hopkins who are the pioneers in this field. The wikipedia page for the Ketogenic Diet diet also has information on the diet as it relates to treating epilepsy. The diet below is simply for rapid and effective weight loss and uses a 1 to 1 fat to protein ratio rather than the 4 to 1 fat to combined protein and carbs ratio of the Ketogenic Diet pioneered by Johns Hopkins used to treat epilepsy. [wp_ad_camp_3] Disclaimer: I am neither a doctor nor self proclaimed nutrition expert so please consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any action that affects your health and wellbeing. After finishing Gary Taubes latest book, which seems to have rapidly become the cornerstone of a new approach to nutrition, I’ve become very interested in the Ketogenic diet. The speed of weight loss I’ve seen is incredible and my energy level has remained high. The science behind a ketogenic diet is solidly backed up by Taubes research published in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat“. According to Taubes’ research, it may also be the only way for people who have become severely insulin resistant, to effectively lose weight. The Ketogenic diet has always lived on the fringes of diet lore and has been seen as extreme. But the reality is that the low glycemic index diet (Low GI Diet) is effective because it is close to, but not quite, a ketogenic diet. Other diets like the South Beach Diet are also only effective because of the reduction in carbs and consequently insulin levels. The science behind this diet looks solid and it is part of the massive shift in nutrition research we’ve seen in the last few years. Prominent sport Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: Coffee And Insulin, Fat And Post-workout Meals

Dear Mark: Coffee And Insulin, Fat And Post-workout Meals

159 Comments In today’s edition of Dear Mark, I cover two topics near and dear to many of your hearts. First, I discuss the interaction between coffee intake and insulin. Does coffee stimulate its secretion? Does it impair insulin’s function, or our body’s reaction to it? Find out how you should approach coffee on a Primal Blueprint eating plan. Then, I explore the suitability of dietary fat in the post-workout meal. Does it belong? Should you be stocking skim milk, de-fatted chicken breast, non-fat yogurt, and cartons of egg whites for your post-workout meals? If you’ve just lifted something heavy, should you therefore shun the yolks and fear the fat for the rest of the day? Find out below. Let’s go. Does coffee raise insulin levels? A lot of contradictory stuff out there. Hoping you could get to the bottom of it. Also, how does it affect GABA? Thanks Odin What makes coffee research so confusing is that a lot of it is actually caffeine research. You see, researchers love isolating whole food constituents to avoid confounding variables. It’s easier to get a definitive result about caffeine than it is to get one about coffee, because coffee contains huge and diverse levels of antioxidant compounds. If you don’t, and coffee has a health effect, how do you know if it’s the caffeine or something else in coffee causing the effect? That’s helpful, but most of us are drinking coffee – not popping caffeine pills. So, while caffeine is definitely one of the main active compounds in coffee, it’s not the only one. Adjust your interpretation of “coffee” research accordingly. That said, both caffeine and coffee have been shown to exert negative effects on insulin sensitivity. Not on insulin itself, though. As standalone substances (without a meal to accompa Continue reading >>

Will This Kick Me Out Of Ketosis?

Will This Kick Me Out Of Ketosis?

A common question people have when starting keto is “will this kick me out of ketosis?” I’m going to address as many items as I can think of and explain why it will or will not kick you out of keto. This is going to be as comprehensive as possible so either use ctrl + f to find what you’re looking for or buckle up and read on. How do humans enter ketosis in the first place? Things will become much more clear if we explain how humans enter ketosis. Mainly, liver glycogen is what determines if ketones will be produced. Specifically, glycogen in the liver signals malonyl-coa to be formed by carboxylating acetyl-coa. Acetyl-coa is used in many processes and it’s the main substrate used to be turned into ketones. The wiki on regulation of ketogenesis which applies to this scenario says “When the body has no free carbohydrates available, fat must be broken down into acetyl-CoA in order to get energy. Acetyl-CoA is not being recycled through the citric acid cycle because the citric acid cycle intermediates (mainly oxaloacetate) have been depleted to feed the gluconeogenesis pathway, and the resulting accumulation of acetyl-CoA activates ketogenesis.” Basically, when there is more acetyl-CoA than oxaloacetate, the acetyl-CoA becomes acetoacetate, a ketone body. In plain English, carbs provide oxaloacetate, so if it doesn’t have carbs, it likely isn’t going to kick you out of ketosis. I’ll state the exceptions later. Why do humans enter ketosis so readily? Humans enter ketosis faster than any animal on the planet. It usually takes 24-36 hours before we enter ketosis.This is because we have huge brains and tiny bodies. Our brains need ~400 calories/day, which for most people that equates to 20% of our total energy demands. To put this in perspective, most anim Continue reading >>

Does Cheese, Nuts Or Coffee Impact A Ketogenic Diet?

Does Cheese, Nuts Or Coffee Impact A Ketogenic Diet?

There is a lot of conflicting data on whether cheese, nuts or coffee are ideal or acceptable for a ketogenic diet. So let me clear the air a little with some of my experiences and bring in a pinch of clarity and sanity to the issue. SO are cheese, nuts and/or coffee harmful when taken while on keto? What are the impacts? Are there any specifications as to the quantities, if it ideal to take them? Are they diet friendly? Let’s review. Cheese A lot of people will argue that eating cheese on a ketogenic diet is harmful. The assumption that by eating cheese you are prone to taking in additional carbs, which is not 100% true. Yes, cheese does contains carbs so as long as you don’t go over the carb limit, you’ll be good. The thing to be concerned about is most individuals have a sensitivity to dairy products (and don’t know it), due to the casein in them. So if you have dietary sensitivity to it, avoid it (many people who suffer from a keto diet stall should cut out cheese). Cheese can be a great source of fat soluble vitamins. Eaten in moderation therefore, cheese is ok. Nuts Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake. Coffee & Caffeine Biggest grey area in the world of keto. Coffee is engraved in our cultur Continue reading >>

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

One of the reasons The Bulletproof Diet with Bulletproof Coffee works so well for people looking to lose weight is that Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting helps your body to more easily enter a state called cyclical ketosis, which is great for a whole bunch of reasons. Ketosis is a cornerstone of becoming Bulletproof; listen to these recent Bulletproof Radio episodes with ketosis experts Jimmy Moore and Dominic D’Agostino to get the scoop on how and why it works. It’s what happens when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar for energy, and it only happens when you eat almost no carbohydrates, or when you hack it using certain kinds of oils. Many people first stumble upon the idea of ketosis while looking for a weight loss strategy. That can be a major part of it for so many people out there who have tried just about every other diet out there but haven’t seen the results they’d hoped for. But when people experience the mental clarity and focus that ketosis brings, the game changes! This post walks you through one of the most important yet underrated mechanisms that makes ketosis so effective for people who have tried everything else to lose weight and failed to keep it off: appetite suppression. Ketosis works for weight loss in the short term, but that’s not why it’s so amazing. Short term weight loss is easy (I’ve lost at least 200 pounds of short term weight…because it always roared back on with a vengeance so I could lose it again!) When you look at keeping your weight off forever, ketosis provides a level of appetite suppression that is actually liberating. Ketosis helps you literally stop thinking about food all the time. Why Calorie Counting Is So Ineffective One of the reasons old-fashioned, calorie-restricted diets tend to fail is becau Continue reading >>

Living Longer With Coffee

Living Longer With Coffee

Drinking coffee on a low carb diet has never been so controversial. There’s a long list of science-backed health benefits of coffee. But is fighting disease and living longer worth the risks of caffeine? Best coffee for low carb diets Caffeine reactions on low carb Benefits, health studies and research When to kick the coffee habit Is Coffee OK for Keto? Some low carbers have no problems with coffee, while others release unhealthy levels of cortisol – a stress hormone. These low carbers become over-stimulated and easily dependent on the caffeine in coffee. Everyone reacts differently to coffee and caffeine. If your low carb diet is stable with minimal cravings for sugar, drinking a few cups of coffee per day is safe – and enough to gain some major health benefits. One cup of coffee adds only a carb or two to your daily total, and is a fast way to add healthy fats to your low carb diet. Best Coffee for Ketosis Espresso and black coffee are almost zero carb, perfect for your low carb diet. Use heavy cream or half-and-half, and sugar substitutes. Feeling adventurous? Drink a healthy fat-burning coffee made with butter. Reasons to Add Coffee It is well-known that small amounts of caffeine are good for attention, clarity and brain function. But coffee also improves our health, extending our lifespan. Some studies show both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee have the same positive health effects. These studies suggest something other than caffeine in the coffee is responsible for the results. Health Benefits of Coffee Coffee stimulates peristalsis, helping relieve constipation. Coffee has beneficial antioxidants. Drinking coffee lowers the risk of depression among women. Coffee with heavy cream is an acceptable low carb treat and an excellent substitute when you’re Continue reading >>

Keto Drinks: What Is Safe To Drink On The Ketogenic Diet?

Keto Drinks: What Is Safe To Drink On The Ketogenic Diet?

We talk a lot about keto foods here, but today, it is all about the drinks! When it comes to drinks on keto, plain old water is king. However, sometimes you might want something else to enjoy with meals or as a nice refreshment. So, let’s look at what is safe to drink on the ketogenic diet, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic. Non-Alcoholic Drinks Here are some options for every day drinks during the week or the weekend: Coffee Drinks Many people turn to coffee for extra alertness. Is it okay on keto? Yes! It can even be helpful if you’re new to ketosis or beginning intermittent fasting and experience tiredness at first. Just be careful what you add to it. Some coffee ideas include: Plain ole’ black. Enjoy drip, espresso, cold brew, aeropress, iced, etc. as black as coal for all the caffeine without anything added. With milk. Add a splash of unsweetened full-fat dairy, almond milk, or coconut milk to your morning cup or combine with espresso for a no-sugar, low-carb latte. “Bulletproof” coffee. Created by Dave Asprey, Bulletproof coffee includes some special ingredients, but you can easily make your own simpler version at home. Add a good fat source from MCT oil or powder, coconut oil, or grass-fed butter to your coffee and blend. This can be a great option first thing in the morning because you’re getting easily digestible fats that continue the fat burning from your overnight fast, giving you a nice jolt of energy. Plenty of variation options too when it comes to keto coffee. Like those sugar-laden pumpkin spice lattes? Add some spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves to fancy it up even more. Want a healthy keto mocha? Add some coconut oil and unsweetened cocoa powder for a creamy, chocolatey treat. Tea Drinks Most teas have virtually no carbs, so they are Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

Another very common question asked by those new to a Zero Carb diet is: Can I Drink Alcohol on a Zero Carb Diet? There have been many posts about this subject in the Facebook group Zeroing in on Health. I have selected some of the best comments from these discussions and posted them here for easy reference. While occasional or even moderate consumption of dry, non-sweet alcohol might be okay for some people. Those who are new to a Zero Carb diet are strongly encouraged to abstain from it during their initial 30-Day trial. Once you have a clear baseline of how you feel on just meat and water, then you can easily test out other things like dairy or alcohol and get a much better idea of how your body is personally affected by them. … Dr. Paul Mabry: I’m a retired MD with years of low carb ketogenic blogging experience. I’m day 6 on this new and from all my research intuitively beautiful way of eating. There have been some questions about alcohol so I wanted to post this short answer on the basic science of alcohol in layman’s terms which apply equally to low carb and zero carb: Moderate alcohol can be accommodated on the diet. Alcohol is metabolized exclusively in the liver and does not stimulate the release of Insulin which is the big enemy of people like me who suffer from the metabolic syndrome. Things to know if you’re going to drink alcohol is that many forms contain carbs that can torpedo any weight loss. The worst offenders are beers, even lite ones, sweet wines though all wines contain carbs the dry ones contain the least and some drinks like hard cider and lemonade are as bad as drinking Coke. You will have to count carbs if you consume these. Drinks like Rum, Scotch, Whiskey and Vodka have zero carbs if you drink them with water. However, Scotch and Whi Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine (or Chocolate) Raise Insulin, Thereby Stopping Fat Burning (ketosis)?

Does Caffeine (or Chocolate) Raise Insulin, Thereby Stopping Fat Burning (ketosis)?

So caffeine and the stimulant in chocolate raises insulin. Insulin shuts down fat oxidation. So, if you are in ketosis, on VLC, won't drinking coffee or eating raw dark chocolate shut of that nice fat burning mode? I know when I am VLC, if I have ANY, I mean a few SIPS of tea or nibbles of cacao, I IMMEDIATELY get that "hormonally hungry" feeling. Any thoughts? EDIT So I've found that on meat/fat only days, in Ketosis, caffeine or stimulants of any kind make me feel terrible, and VERY hormonally hungry between meals (with the same timing and calories that on non-caffeine days are satiating). I literally can scarcely make it to my next meal, feeling utterly starved and losing all concentration. However, on carb-up days after exercise, I can eat some chocolate or drink some tea, and while I feel quite stimulated (perhaps too much, I seem to be sensitive), it isn't a bad feeling, and I don't get the hunger afterwards. Interesting. Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

In an ideal world, there would be clear-cut criteria laid out in black and white about how to do a low-carb diet. While there are certain basics that apply to virtually every low-carb plan, there are also what I would describe as “gray areas” where it will really depend on the individual to figure out for themselves. One such issue is caffeine. If you have read Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution, then you know the late great Dr. Robert C. Atkins addresses this subject a couple of times–but only in passing. Here are the two brief references I found in my mass paperback version of the book: Page 189–“Excessive caffeine has been shown to cause a hypoglycemic reaction, which will provoke cravings and cause you to overeat. Omitting caffeine may be a big sacrifice for you, but, in my experience, weight loss often starts up again as soon as people remove caffeine from their regimen.” Page 222–“Consume caffeine only in moderation.” Other than those two points, Dr. Atkins didn’t say much else about caffeine consumption. Obviously he felt there was enough of a negative metabolic response to caffeine intake for him to dissuade Atkins dieters to try to steer clear of it as much as possible. But what about the impact of caffeine on ketosis? Is there any and what guidelines can people following a low-carb diet use to gauge what amount of caffeine intake they can tolerate while still losing weight? These are some of the questions that were explored by one of my intelligent readers in the following e-mail: Hi Jimmy, I would like to clear something up with your help. I feel there needs to be a summary, possibly a FAQ, on caffeine. Here’s my question: What are the effects of caffeine, ESPECIALLY when one is in ketosis? When talking about caffeine, there are several h Continue reading >>

Does Green Coffee Bean Extract Help You Lose Weight?

Does Green Coffee Bean Extract Help You Lose Weight?

Green coffee bean extract has been marketed and has become one of the top selling weight loss products in recent years and with good reason. The health benefits of green coffee bean extract are real and can improve both mental and physical performance. The question is, does green coffee bean extract help you lose weight? Coffee is a major commodity enjoyed worldwide and one of the greatest sources of antioxidants found in people’s diets today. This caffeinated beverage has unfortunately been labeled harmful food due to the negative health associations with caffeine. The impact of caffeine on every person is different and can pose a serious health hazard to some while others tolerate caffeine well. Not as unhealthy as once though, polyphenols are a class of antioxidants contained in coffee and coffee can be seen as a very healthy beverage when regularly consumed. Two Major Classifications of Coffee The two major categories of coffee plants are Robusta and Arabica. The Arabica coffee plant is highest in the polyphenols chlorogenic and caffeic acid. These antioxidant properties makes Arabica coffee one of the best coffee types. Unfortunately, the process of roasting coffee reduces the antioxidant content of the finished coffee product and most coffee drinkers are not receiving these health benefits (3). Green coffee beans however are coffee beans that have not been roasted and are packed with antioxidants. (1, 5) In fact, green coffee bean extract is highly bioavailable in humans. Clinical studies have shown that antioxidants with impressive anti-inflammatory effects on the body are present in green coffee extract and readily absorbed. The two major types of chlorgenic acids found in nature, caffeoylquinic acids (CQA) and dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQA), are primarily res Continue reading >>

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