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Do Low Carb Diets Work If Not In Ketosis

Troubleshoot Diarrhea On A Low Carb, Keto Diet

Troubleshoot Diarrhea On A Low Carb, Keto Diet

When transitioning into a low carb, keto diet, there are some funky things that happen with your digestive tract. As always, the preliminary stages are a time to adjust to your new way of eating. Usually, with a dramatic increase in fat and reduction in carbs, most people will experience a period of loose bowels or diarrhea, which is normal. There are claims that this effect is candida die-off, but I’ve yet to find literature in which that is verified. These symptoms last just a couple of days. For others, this period is lengthened and it can be a little trickier. If you are experiencing diarrhea, you could try the following: 1. Drink more water Many people don’t realize that when you start a low carb, keto diet that your body is flushing water much more rapidly than you have before. When this happens, it’s extremely easy to be dehydrated. Make sure you are drinking enough water to stay hydrated. You will notice that you will go to the bathroom a lot more frequently, but this is also an adjustment period. After a week or so, your body will be used to the increase in water intake and will level off. 2. Consume more electrolytes This goes along with the previous statement. When water is flushed from the body, electrolytes are also excreted through the urine. If the electrolytes aren’t replaced, you could very easily become dehydrated and develop diarrhea, among other things. Some good ways to replenish these electrolytes is to eat avocado, consume salty bone broth daily and if that isn’t cutting it, try taking Lite Salt with your food (this can replace your regular table salt). Drinking bone broth will also contain collagen which could help bulk up stools and aid in the gut-healing process. 3. Add probiotics and fermented foods Probiotics are excellent for bulki Continue reading >>

Low Carb Dieting Myths

Low Carb Dieting Myths

The myths about low carb dieting and specifically ketogenic diets abound in the American collective consciousness. These are just a few of the most pervasive myths I've encountered, with explanations as to why they are incorrect and simply don't make sense, scientifically: Myth 1: Carbs are an essential nutrient for good health. Some nutrition professionals still believe that carbohydrates are necessary to provide glucose to fuel the brain and avoid hypoglycemia. It's an old way of thinking, and it's just not true scientifically. Essential nutrients are nutrients which your body cannot make, so they have to be obtained on a daily basis from your food sources. There are essential proteins, and essential fatty acids, but there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate. When the body is in ketosis, it has a “glucose sparing” effect. First, the skeletal muscles burn fatty acids preferentially which spares glucose for the brain to use. Second, once a person is keto-adapted, the brain switches to using ketone bodies for over half of the fuel it needs, and less glucose is needed since ketone bodies are being used as an alternative fuel. This small amount of carbohydrate (glucose or blood sugar) needed to fuel the brain during keto adaptation can be generated internally. Your liver can make all the glucose needed for brain function from glycogen stored in the liver. And if need be, the body can also make glucose from the protein in your food. Hence, carbohydrates are NOT essential nutrients, and many people, such as the Inuit of Alaska and the Masai of Africa live without them for long periods of time without any effect on health and well-being. The “brain needs carbs” idea is only true if you consistently eat a high carb diet (as most registered dietitians will tel Continue reading >>

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

I was in my 20s when I started suffering from severe fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. I was 300 pounds, sick constantly, and almost had to drop out of grad school because I couldn’t concentrate. Back then, I thought my inability to think clearly and perform at high levels was some sort of moral failing. I would beat myself up. I would work harder and stay up later, trying to catch up with my peers. I tried every diet imaginable, including raw vegan and years of falling off the low-fat bandwagon. I hit the treadmill for hours every day. Nothing worked. So I took matters into my own hands. The Bulletproof Diet was born after a decade of working with some of the world’s top health and nutrition researchers. Over a span of about 15 years, I devoured thousands of research papers and books on human nutrition. I used my body as a testing ground to determine what worked best for my biology. The result is a diet that has helped thousands of people lose fat and gain the energy and clarity they thought they’d lost forever. So, what differentiates the Bulletproof Diet from other low-carb diets? Read on to find out. For an in-depth plan on how to boost energy and increase brain function in just two weeks, get your copy of Head Strong. Bulletproof vs. Paleo: The Big Picture If you were to map out the most popular diets, you’d see a vast spectrum of practices and plans ranging from low-fat vegan to high-fat, low-carb (HFLC). This deliciously fatty end of the spectrum is where the Bulletproof Diet and the Primal, Paleo, and Atkins diets would lie. The Paleo diet eliminates processed foods and focuses on what our paleolithic ancestors ate – mostly meat, plants, nuts, and seeds. The Bulletproof Diet is similar but designed to maximize your willpower by reducing cravings and m Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

15 Health Benefits Of Low-carb & Ketogenic Diets (i Love No. 9)

15 Health Benefits Of Low-carb & Ketogenic Diets (i Love No. 9)

Remember in the 90s when low-carb diets were getting all the media attention? At the time, for a lot of people, low-carb was just another fad, questioning whether low-carb was healthy at all. Concerns were raised over whether a high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet could increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Since then, however, low-carb diets have been studied extensively. Not only is low-carb great for losing weight, but it turns out it is the healthiest diet you can eat, including benefits for your cardiovascular health! Low-carb might have been a fad in the 90s, but it isn't 'just another fad diet.' It works. Continue reading >>

Most People Shouldn't Attempt Low-carb Diets Like Keto Or Paleo

Most People Shouldn't Attempt Low-carb Diets Like Keto Or Paleo

Sustainable health change occurs not by finding a "perfect" diet — finding is fairly passive — but rather through creating an individualized health "mix." Creating is active, and health is an active process. To create an individualized health mix, you have to learn about the various nutrition options available and parse out the nutritional guidelines that will work for YOU. My personal mix is built upon being aware of what I put in my body, as well as pillars "stolen" from a variety of sources. I limit snacking and aim for a substantial gap between dinner and breakfast — thanks, intermittent fasting. I eat almost exclusively from the "outside of the grocery store" — meaning fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and good-quality fats — thanks, Paleo, and habits formed while being vegetarian. Plus, I eat what I love in moderation. I call this my "love it rule" — thanks, Weight Watchers for the balanced approach. I use what works for me and ignore what doesn't. Curious what your "mix" is? Earlier, I covered the pros and cons of high-protein diets. Then, I examined the vegetarian versus vegan versus high-protein debate. I've also tackled "low-fat" diets, the Mediterranean diet, and Weight Watchers. Today a smorgasbord of smaller analyses (I only have so much space and the material for analysis is endless): the ketogenic diet, Paleo, intermittent fasting, and meal delivery services. Ketogenic diet The ketogenic diet advocates extremely low-carbohydrate (10-15 grams daily) and high-fat (75 per cent of diet) consumption. The goal is to put your body into ketosis so that it uses ketones as energy. The rationale is that the diet gives you the benefits of fasting — such as fat loss — without actually having to fast. I know I am supposed to be "Switzerland," Continue reading >>

Why A Low Carb Diet May Not Be Best For You

Why A Low Carb Diet May Not Be Best For You

Does Low Carb = Low Energy? I have yet to meet a woman on a long-term, low carb diet who is loving life. I’m here to explain why I think this may be the case. While we have, collectively, reacted to the low-fat brainwashing of the past half-century, with a defiant, “Fat rules!” attitude, this zeal may be taking us too far astray. I am passionate about the ancestral diet and everything implied by “going back to our roots”, but I also raise a brow at more rigid interpretations, assumptions, and academic flourishes about true replication of a Paleolithic diet. We’ve relinquished Darwin and redeemed Lamarck, so the truth is that we can evolve (or devolve) within one generation. Adaptations to stress and environmental exposures can change our biology and impact our grandchildren. Thanks to the work of Weston Price, we may not have to go back as far as the Paleolithic to send the body a signal of safety. As recently as the early 1900s, he found traditional cultures flourishing, many with incorporation of agricultural foods like grains and legumes. That said, we also know that the microbiome plays a powerful role in adaptation to these foods, and that some of our guts may not be up for the challenge. Back in my self-experimentation days, I spent two months on a carb-restricted diet, kicking starchy veggies, fruit, and grains to the curb. I felt great for two weeks, and not a day after. I felt cloudy, tired, and started obsessing about moisturizer and conditioner. Perhaps this is most relevant for those with a history of compromised thyroid function, as the Jaminets have discussed, but I believe it’s relevant to many women. Many Body Types = Many Right Diets I look to the Hadza whose women foster gender-distinct microbial profiles, ostensibly related to their cons Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets And Endometriosis

Low Carb Diets And Endometriosis

This post was half inspired by another instagram question, and half by my own life experience. The other day, another lovely girl inquired about low carb diets and endometriosis, and if I have any experience with this. Fun story – I do. The TL;DR is that a low carb diet is the way to go here. But, I’ll explain below with the actual details… Most of the articles I’ve found online about endometriosis and diet link the type of diet that is correlated with the existence of endometriosis. Well, that doesn’t help us at all. If you’ve already got endometriosis, you don’t need to know what kind of diet or lifestyle is related to maybe not getting the condition. Even then, if you want to follow that advice to see if a statistically and theoretically preventative diet will help you manage symptoms, the articles tend to focus on things NOT to eat – don’t consume meat, or dairy, or alcohol. Okay, cool. So, we’re left with a dearth of articles actually focusing on what to eat if you have endometriosis. So, let’s get into it. Spoiler – low carb diets and endometriosis were meant to be. What is endometriosis? Just in case you aren’t wholly familiar with this situation, let’s take a look: endometriosis is a condition where the tissue that lines your uterus (the endometrium), grows outside of your uterus. It’s commonly considered to be an auto-immune condition. It’s also important to note that this is the tissue that grows that nice little blood cushion, egg bed every month. So, that same little cushiony egg bed that was totally fine inside of your uterus, now grows outside of it, too. This contributes to symptoms like lower back pain, severe cramping, heavy periods, fertility issues, often painful bowel movements or IBS, and period pain that is so bad yo Continue reading >>

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

These are the top 10 reasons you’re not losing weight on a low carb diet. A great FREE printable for the fridge and an easy reminder to stay on track. Just click on the image below to save the PDF for printing. UPDATE – watch the quick video below. No compatible source was found for this media. Top 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight Eating LCHF Too Many Carbohydrates – are carbs starting to sneak back into your diet? Be honest and start tracking everything using KetoDietApp. A little treat here and there adds up. Some are more carb sensitive (or insulin resistant) than others. I know that my carbs have to be around 50g/day to be feeling great and in control of my appetite. Lower than that and I will lose a little bit of weight, above that and I know my weight loss will stall. I generally go between 35-70g/day without too much tracking because I have done it for so long. Too Much Fruit – yes I use berries on my breakfast and desserts, but that is it. I allow my children to eat fruit (without gorging) as they are fit, healthy and in the normal weight range. For me, the sugar and fructose in fruit is too much. Sure, enjoy it as a treat and eat only low carb nutritent dense berries. See fruit as an occasional sweet treat. Packed with fibre, antioxidants, nutrients……… “If you are overweight, fruit is not your friend” Too much Dairy – my biggest downfall is milk. I love my lattes and flat whites. Now milk is great, full of protein and calcium, but it also contains about 5% carbs. A latte can range from 9g to 15g carbs depending on the size you choose. Most dairy such as milk, cream and yoghurt contains approximately 4- 5% but you are more likely to drink a large glass of milk, eat a bowl of yoghurt or drink a large latte than eat 250g of full fat cheese Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Food List, Including Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Ketogenic Diet Food List, Including Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Ketogenic Diet Food List, Including Best vs. Worst Keto Foods Dr. Axe on Facebook989 Dr. Axe on Twitter23 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest1021 Share on Email Print Article Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet or keto diet has been practiced for more thannine decades(since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels , and the cycle of restricting and binging on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. Yet thats not a problem with whatson the keto diet food list. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic, low-carb diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvements. It works because it changes the very fuel source that the body uses to stay energized: Namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) to dietary fat, courtesy ofketo recipes and the ketogenic diet food list items, including high-fat, low-carb foods. Making that switch will place your body in a state of ketosis, when your body becomes a fat burner rather than a sugar burner. The steps are surprising simple: Increase your consumption of healthy fats. Without glucose coursing through your body, its now forced to burn fat and produce ketones instead. Once the blood levels of ketones rise to a certain point, you officially enter into ketosis. Thi Continue reading >>

Are Low-carb Diets Effective For Weight Loss?

Are Low-carb Diets Effective For Weight Loss?

Do you want to lose weight, build muscle, or feel more fit? Join Beachbody On Demand, and get unlimited access to Beachbody’s world-famous programs, including 21 Day FIX®, CORE DE FORCE®, and P90X®. Don’t miss out on your chance for amazing results. Sign up today! You’ve probably heard about the benefits of a low-carb diet. Namely, that you’ll experience rapid weight loss by ditching the bread basket and doubling down on a cut of steak. But a low-carb diet isn’t that straightforward in actual practice. Though the principle behind it sounds simple enough — less pasta! more protein! — the diet can be easy to misinterpret. Thanks in part to the perpetuation of popular low-carb diets like the Atkins Diet, which recommended replacing carbs with virtually any high-fat, high-protein foods when it came onto the scene in the early ’70s (it’s now a phased approach that includes gradual increases in carbs), many people end up taking low-carb diets to extreme measures. People nixed hash browns and toast, and piled their plates with bacon, eggs, and sausages with impunity. Some people lost weight, and often quickly, following this model. But, why exactly can people lose weight following a low-carb diet? What Is a Low-Carb Diet, and How Do You Lose Weight on It? According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, carbohydrates should make up 45 to 65 percent of a person’s total daily calorie intake. Any amount less than this could be considered low carb. For someone consuming 2,000 calories a day, this is about 225 to 325 grams of carbohydrates per day. Most low-carb diets limit carbohydrate intake to between 50 to 150 grams per day, depending on the diet, so there’s some variation. If you want to follow a low-carb diet in a way that optimizes overal Continue reading >>

Is A Low-carb Diet Effective For Burning Fat? Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Is A Low-carb Diet Effective For Burning Fat? Is Ketosis Dangerous?

“The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.” ~William Gibson One hundred years from now, medical doctors, scientists, nutritionists, and the general public will be puzzled and astounded by how few of us were able to grasp the obvious – high-carb, low-fat diets simply do not achieve long-term fat loss. Athletes, bodybuilders, Hollywood and others have known for decades that a low-carb, high-protein diet achieves incredible fat metabolism and enables rapid muscle gains. Hundreds of scientific studies have – again and again – proven the same. Special interests have ridiculed and disparaged these approaches and prevented most of this knowledge, however, from being incorporated into conventional wisdom. While some diets do follow effective fat loss principles, many take them to extremes (Atkins, Dukan, the Ketogenic Diet, etc.), advocating weight loss at any cost. Avoiding fruits and vegetables while encouraging hot dogs and bacon binges – while it might actually help you lose weight in the short term – is not a healthy or sustainable strategy. The LeanBody System is unlike these diets in that you will achieve fat loss and muscle gains as a direct result of improving your overall health, not sacrificing it. So How Do Low-Carb Diets Work? Extreme low-carb diets push the body into ketosis, which means that the body primarily burns fat (instead of carbs) for energy and levels of ketones in the blood are elevated. Ketones are small carbon fragments created by the breakdown of fat stores after the body is depleted of stored glucose (known as glycogen). Humans can use ketones as energy for bodily functions and even as a replacement for glucose to provide fuel to the brain. Since the body relies on stored fat for energy, people lose weight – Continue reading >>

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

Five people have recently told me they were going to “try keto”—the most recent after gushing about a mutual friend who has been doing keto, aka the popular ketogenic diet, and getting awesome-looking results. You’ve probably heard rumblings about keto, but what the heck is it? And is it too good to be true? Let’s first get you caught up on all the hubbub around the ketogenic diet. Keto is an extremely low-carb, moderate-protein, and high-fat diet. You’ll find those on keto gobbling up stuff like fat slabs of bacon, mountains of avocados, and cartons of heavy whipping cream. There’s a lot of enthusiastic fanfare around it, like this comment on Reddit: Awesome. And then there’s this one: Low-carb diets are nothing new for weight loss. And keto is kind of a low-carb diet with a twist in that you emphasize tons of fat. I spoke to Leigh Peele, NASM certified personal trainer who fields questions on all matters of weight loss, metabolism, and nutrition, and is author of Starve Mode; and she told me that the original definition of keto is a 4:1 ratio of fats to carbohydrates or protein. That is, for every gram of protein or carb you eat, you would also eat four grams of fat (hence, the avocados and heavy whipping cream). But you don’t have to stick to that exactly as long as your carbs are low and protein moderate enough to properly be “ketogenic.” Let me explain. Differences Between Keto and a Low-Carb Diet Keto’s trump card against the average low-carb diet is that, after consistently depriving yourself of bread, pasta, donuts, and any carb source, your body goes into ketosis (between a couple of days and a week). Ketosis means your body is breaking down fat and releasing large quantities of molecules called ketones into your bloodstream. Your body t Continue reading >>

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

Why You’re Not In Ketosis

As the COO of Diet Doctor and low-carb enthusiast for years, you would have thought I’d nailed ketosis years ago. I haven’t, and here’s why. Am I still in ketosis? To get into ketosis, the most important thing is to eat maximum 20 grams of digestible carbs per day. When I went low carb in 2012, I followed that advice to the letter – replacing all high-carb foods like potatoes, bread, rice, pasta, legumes, fruit, juice, soda, and candy, with eggs, dairy, meat, vegetables, fats and berries – counting every carb I consumed. I felt great – effortless weight loss, no stomach issues, tons of energy and inspiration. But over time, something changed – I no longer felt as great as I used to. Until recently, I had no idea why. The journey to find out started with a simple question: Am I still in ketosis? The moment of truth At a Diet Doctor dinner a while ago, our CTO, Johan, gently challenged me. “Bjarte, you’re eating quite a lot of protein. Have you measured your ketones lately?”. “No”, I said, feeling slightly defensive, “I’ve never measured my ketones. Should I?”. It was wake-up time. Johan and I grabbed two blood-ketone meters from a dusty drawer, pricked a finger each, and touched the ketone strips. His results came out first – 3.0 mmol/L – optimal ketosis. He looked happy. It was my turn. The ketone meter made a weird beeping sound and the screen started blinking – 0.0 mmol/L – no ketosis whatsoever. What?! I’d been eating strict low carb for years, how could I not be in ketosis? I felt slightly embarrassed, but mainly relieved. Was this the reason I no longer felt great? Experiment 1: Eating less than 60 grams of protein a day Several of my colleagues agreed with Johan – I was eating too much protein. To test that hypothesis, I s Continue reading >>

Introduction To Ketogenic Diet

Introduction To Ketogenic Diet

A ketogenic diet is known for being a high-fat low-carb diet, where ketone bodies are produced in the liver and used as a fuel source. It has many different names such as the keto diet, ketogenic diet, ketone diet, ketosis diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. Consuming a meal high in carbohydrates will cause your body to produce glucose and insulin. During high carb dieting, the body can expect endless amounts energy to keep entering the body. But in the state of ketosis, mobilizing fats as a fuel source becomes the bodies new role. Learn more of the basics with an introduction to a ketogenic diet. Low Carb Diet VS Ketogenic Diet Keto and low carb diets are comparable in numerous ways. On a ketogenic diet, your body shifts into a state of ketosis and the brain are essentially fueled by ketones. These are created in the liver when carbohydrate consumption is very low. Low carb diets can involve different things for different people. Of all diets ‘low carb’ is simply reducing your total carbohydrate consumption. With regular low-carb dieting, the brains preference still is mostly dependent on glucose though it may burn higher ketones than on a normal diet.(1) To achieve this, you would have to be following a low carb, low calorie and have an active lifestyle. Quantities of carbohydrates you eat are your choice depending on the type of diet you are on. Low carb at the end of the day is your carb intake reduced. Amounts can vary enormously with the number of total carbs eaten per day. Ranging from 0 to 100 grams of net carbs, people have different opinions and follow various guidelines. Although, a ketogenic diet has low carbohydrates it also has significantly lower protein levels. Altogether blood levels of ketones are notable increased overall. Introduc Continue reading >>

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