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Do Low Carb Diets Work If Not In Ketosis

15 Health Benefits Of Low-carb & Ketogenic Diets (i Love No. 9)

15 Health Benefits Of Low-carb & Ketogenic Diets (i Love No. 9)

Remember in the 90s when low-carb diets were getting all the media attention? At the time, for a lot of people, low-carb was just another fad, questioning whether low-carb was healthy at all. Concerns were raised over whether a high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet could increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Since then, however, low-carb diets have been studied extensively. Not only is low-carb great for losing weight, but it turns out it is the healthiest diet you can eat, including benefits for your cardiovascular health! Low-carb might have been a fad in the 90s, but it isn't 'just another fad diet.' It works. Continue reading >>

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

But he didn’t start dropping the pounds until a friend who had lost a lot of weight suggested he try a ketogenic diet. Gross switched to the high-fat, ultra-low-carb diet and lost 70 pounds in seven months. And he’s kept at it for five years. Though online searches about ketogenic diets started spiking last year, the diet was created in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy. When you’re on a keto diet and you’re in what’s called ketosis, a metabolic process forces the body to burn stored fat because there’s not enough glucose for energy. Fans of the keto diet say they have more energy and better focus. The diet, however, is restrictive and can be difficult to maintain. A group of local nutrition experts say the diet is safe, but they were split over whether they would recommend it for everyone. Burning fat How does the diet work? Our bodies break down carbohydrates when we eat. Those carbs are turned into glucose that fuels our cells, giving us energy. Eating keto A difficult start Continue reading >>

Low Carbohydrate - How Do Low Carb Diets Work?

Low Carbohydrate - How Do Low Carb Diets Work?

Reviewed by Dietitian, Juliette Kellow BSc RD Low carb diets, like the Atkin's diet have been around for a long time. Do they work? Are they safe? Read dietitian, Juliette Kellow's verdict on low carbohydrate diets. Well Known Low Carb Diets As well as the Atkin's diet, low carbohydrate is the basis for a number of diet plans, the list below shows some of the more well-known versions. The different types do have minor variations but all are basically low carb diets. The Atkin's Diet - probably the most famous, by Dr Robert Atkins High Protein Diet Stillman Diet Scarsdale Diet Hollywood Diet Ketogenic Diet What Are Low Carb Diets? Low carb diets are based on the premise that a diet very low in carbohydrate leads to a reduction in the body's insulin production, resulting in fat and protein (muscle) stores being used as its main energy source. The aim of low carbohydrate diets is to force the body to use fat as its main energy source, when this happens a person produces 'ketone bodies' to fuel parts of the body that can not use fat as an energy source - the brain, and red blood cells, in particular. When this happens a person is said to be in a state of ketosis - characterised by smelly breath (an acetone smell like nail varnish) and side effects such as nausea and fatigue. What's Involved? Basically you cut out virtually all carbohydrate from your diet and increase your protein and fat intake. So you cut out things like pasta, bread, rice and alcohol, yet you eat unlimited amounts of meat, cheese and butter. That's why the Atkin's diet claims to be so luxurious. Do Low Carbohydrate Diets Work? In the short term, most people who go on low carb diets do lose weight and they lose it very quickly. However, the majority of weight loss comes from loss of water and muscle tissue Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet

Low-carb Diet

The low-carb diet (also, Low-Carb High Fat (LCHF)) has been popularized in recent years through many fad diets such as Atkins, SugarBusters!, The Zone, South Beach Diet, Protein Power, the paleo diet, Tim Ferriss' slow-carb diet and several others. The variety of low carb diets, and the revisions of existing low/lower carb diets, has produced a range of low and lower carb diets that are healthy ways to lose weight. However, there are still a host of woo-related low carb and no-carb fad diets out there. Carb, protein, fat?[edit] Before any explanation of this can begin, it is important to understand what carbohydrates, protein, and fat are. Everything you consume, at a nutritional level, is water, a mineral, a micronutrient, or a macronutrient.[1] Minerals are non-organic substances that your body needs to survive, like calcium and iron. How do we know, or rather define, them as organic or inorganic? Basically, if it has carbon in it, it is organic. Simple as that. Micronutrients are generally vitamins. Carbohydrates, protein, and fat are macronutrients and they give your body calories. Each one has their own properties based on the composition of their elements (each having a unique mixture and structure of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen), and other chemicals that make up the specific molecules. Each one plays a different role in your body and gives a different amount of calories per gram (4 per gram of protein or carbohydrate, and 9 per gram of fat)[2][3]. There's a huge and technical listing of things that each one does and how they function, and their relation to each other and every other element of your nutrition, especially when you start talking about the different kinds of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. The short version is that fat is used by your body to maint Continue reading >>

You Asked: Should I Try The Ketogenic Diet?

You Asked: Should I Try The Ketogenic Diet?

You Asked: Should I Try the Ketogenic Diet? Dont let its fancy name fool you. A ketogenic diet is, essentially, a low-carb, high-fat dietalbeit one taken to extremes. In a clinical setting, a strict ketogenic diet would involve ultra-low carb consumption, like 20 or 30 grams a day, says Dr. Eric Westman, director of the Lifestyle Medicine Clinic at Duke University. Thats about the number of carbohydrates in one small apple. Westmans research on carb-restricted diets suggests they can help reduce appetite, spur weight loss and improve markers of heart disease. His findings arent outliers. From Atkins and South Beach to Mediterranean and Zone, low-carb, high-fat dietsor LCHF plansare all the rage , and growing evidence suggests theyre a big improvement on the typical carb-heavy American diet. But the keto diet is the most carb-restrictive member of the LCHF gang. Along with slashing carbs, a ketogenic plan also calls for limiting your protein consumption. If you know your macronutrients, you recognize that cutting carbs and restricting protein means seriously upping your fat intake. And thats exactly what a true ketogenic diet entails. Youd want healthy fats to account for about 80% of your calories, and protein around 20%, Westman says. (For comparisons sake, the average American gets roughly 50% of her calories from carbs, 15% from protein, and 30% from fat, per the CDC .) Like the guidance to cut carbs, this advice to reign in protein intake dovetails with some of the latest nutrition science , which suggests limiting protein can lower risk for disease and extend life for people younger than 65. So what, exactly, does ketogenic mean? The name refers to a specific type of energy-carrying molecule, called a ketone. Most people are always in a state of glucosis, meaning Continue reading >>

How To Get Into Ketosis In Less Than 3 Days

How To Get Into Ketosis In Less Than 3 Days

Do you need to get into ketosis super fast? Don't think you can handle the deprivation and hunger of a water fast? The good news is that you don't have to. You can rev up your metabolism, escape hunger, and be on your way to fat burning in one or two days! All it takes is a ketogenic diet that is lower in carbs than standard keto. This will cut your cravings to the bone and switch you from a glucose burning metabolism to burning fat faster than anything else! Ketogenic diets work by reducing basal insulin levels, lowering blood triglycerides, and setting up conditions that will move you into the state of nutritional ketosis. Getting into ketosis is important because when the body produces ketones, your hunger level goes down, your energy goes up, and you experience a state of well-being. All of these benefits will make it easier for you to stick to your low-carb diet plan. On a typical keto diet, it takes 3 to 5 days to enter into the state of ketosis. But how quickly you do that depends on how many carbohydrates you were eating per day before you started restricting them. In addition, if you're looking for the urine testing strips to change colors right now, that only occurs once ketosis is well under way. Most low-carb diets start you off at 20 to 30 net carbs. Atkins 20 and the Reddit version of Keto begin at 20 net carbs, and the Protein Power Lifeplan begins at 30. These amounts are low enough to get the job done within a few days. If you're coming from a carb-heavy diet, it might take a little longer to switch metabolic pathways than if you're merely switching from a low-calorie plan to Atkins, Keto, or LCHF. However, there is a much quicker method that you can use right now instead of these standard Keto diets. The quick-start method I'm going to share with you i Continue reading >>

Top 15 Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Diet

Top 15 Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Diet

Low-carb diets are very effective. That is a scientific fact. However, as with any diet, people sometimes stop losing before they reach their desired weight. Here are the top 15 reasons why you're not losing weight on a low-carb diet. Weight loss isn't a linear process. If you weigh yourself every day, then there will be days where the scale goes down, other days where it goes up. It doesn't mean that the diet isn't working, as long as the general trend is going downwards. Many people lose a lot of weight in the first week of low-carbing, but it is mostly water weight. Weight loss will slow down significantly after that initial phase. Of course, losing weight is not the same as losing fat. It is possible, especially if you're new to weight lifting, that you are gaining muscle at the same time that you're losing fat. To make sure that you're losing, use something other than just the scale (which is a big, fat liar). Use a measuring tape to measure your waist circumference and have your body fat percentage measured every month or so. Also, take pictures. Take note of how your clothes fit. If you're looking thinner and your clothes are looser, then you ARE losing fat no matter what the scale says. Weight loss isn’t linear and there’s a lot more to weight than just body fat. Be patient and use other ways of measuring than just the scale. Some people are more carb sensitive than others. If you're eating low-carb and your weight starts to plateau, then you may want to cut back on carbs even further. In that case, go under 50 grams of carbs per day. When you go under 50 grams per day then you're going to have to eliminate most fruits from your diet, although you can have berries in small amounts. If that doesn't work either, going under 20 grams temporarily can work... eat Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Vs. Low-carb Diet: A Personal Choice

Ketogenic Diet Vs. Low-carb Diet: A Personal Choice

Ketogenic diets (aka keto diets, nutritional ketosis or NK) are currently all the rage, and for good reason. As I wrote in a previous post a few weeks ago, very-low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets (VLCKDs) are extremely effective for weight loss and diabetes, among other things. There's also emerging evidence suggesting they may be beneficial for certain cancers and neurological conditions like Parkinson's disease and ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). Having previously worked in a clinical setting with several patients who had the misfortune of contracting these diseases, I find it very encouraging that following a ketogenic might offer some improvement for them, as well as others in the same boat. I follow a VLCKD and receive a lot of great feedback from others who have also experienced overwhelmingly positive results with this way of eating. I love hearing these success stories, so please keep them coming. However, one reader named Michelle had this to say in the comments section of my recent article: "I don't do well on a very low carb diet; I have to have around 50-70 g's of carbs a day to feel well and function. I guess this is still low carb when compared to the standard diet, but find so much prejudice against me because people say 'If you just stuck to eating VLC you would eventually lose weight and feel better'. This just is not the case with me. I've adapted the LC diet for me and I feel great and I am losing weight steadily. Please folks, stop thinking that one size fits all, it does not! Great site. Thank you for all your efforts." I was disappointed to hear that this woman -- who is most definitely following a low-carb diet and having success doing so -- feels that others are judging her for not restricting carbs to ketogenic levels (generally defined Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq

Ketogenic Diet Faq

With all the new people finding, switching, and transitioning into a low carb diet, I figured it was about time I put together an FAQ on all the common questions that are asked when someone is starting out. I don’t go too in depth in the answers, but I tried to give a direct answer and then link to a more in depth article on the topic to help you fully understand it. If you have any other questions you’d like to be added, changed, or are unsure about – please feel free to leave a comment below so I can fully explain, or make changes to the answers on this page. Best wishes, and to all the new people out there – good luck and happy dieting! Frequently Asked Questions Click any of the questions below and it will take you to the answer. How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis? A ketogenic diet is not a diet that you can whimfully choose to go on and off of at any point. It takes time for your body to adjust and go into a state known as ketosis. This process? Anywhere from 2 – 7 days, depending on your body type, activity levels, and what you’re eating. The fastest way to get into ketosis is to exercise on an empty stomach, restrict your carbohydrate intake to 20g or less per day, and be vigilant with your water intake. To improve the rate at which you enter ketosis, there is a method called Fat Fasting. I’ve written an article on Fat Fasting on a Ketogenic Diet and everything involved with it. Make sure that if you use this method, it is only for a few days, otherwise it can bring harm to you. Where Can I Find Low Carb Recipes? Everywhere on the internet! There’s recipes on almost every health website nowadays, and a quick Google of what you want will definitely help you out. You can even convert high carb recipes that use sugar or fruits in them to low c Continue reading >>

Is It Ever A Good Idea To Eat A High-fat Diet?

Is It Ever A Good Idea To Eat A High-fat Diet?

The dieting world keeps fluctuating between its lead villains. Now that we officially hate sugar, can every meal be loaded with butter, bacon and avocado instead? When the low-fat-everything craze peaked in the late '90s, Australians did not magically become leaner and healthier. Instead, twenty years on, we have an unprecedented level of obesity on our hands. By now we have figured out that the other side of a ‘low fat’ food label should say ‘probably high sugar, will make you fat anyway’. As the case against sugar is mounting, that leaves dietary fats in an interesting situation. No longer the enemy, fatty foods are enjoying a comeback of sorts. The trend is especially prominent within circles adopting the #keto lifestyle. On social media it stands for a parade of athletic bodies, hard-boiled eggs, odd-looking smoothies and a truckload of avocados served in every way imaginable. Keto is short for ‘ketogenic diet’, a scientific approach to going (very) low carb. “The idea of a ketogenic diet is that you restrict carbohydrates to such a low level that your body is mostly using its fat, or the fat that you eat, as its energy store,” explains research scientist and nutrition expert Dr Tim Crowe. This process is called ketosis. “When it's doing that, it produces these things called ketones in your bloodstream. Everybody has ketones in their blood, but on a ketogenic diet the levels are much higher.” The ketogenic diet is actually a medical treatment for children with hard-to-treat epilepsy; when the brain starts using ketones instead of glucose as an energy source, this can also reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures. But lately ketosis is starting to become popular outside its narrow medical application. “Over the last five or ten years there's b Continue reading >>

This Is Why Low-carb Diets Can Be Damaging To Your Health, According To A Dietitian

This Is Why Low-carb Diets Can Be Damaging To Your Health, According To A Dietitian

Rachel Clare says Low-carb diets can be damaging to the human body. The human body creates keto bodies which break down fat reserves instead of carbohydrates. Ketogenic diets can be helpful for people suffering from epilepsy, however. Business Insider UK spoke with professional dietitian Rachel Clare about the dangers of ketogenic diets. Full transcript below Rachel Clare: So the ketogenic diet is when you have next to no carbohydrates in your diet and what that means is that because your body isn’t using energy from carbohydrates it’s breaking down fats to give it the energy that it needs. When you break down the fats in your body, it releases ketone bodies and so when your body’s breaking down more and more fat it produces these ketone bodies and so it means that somebody can be said to be in a “ketogenic state.” In some small medical cases, the ketogenic diet is actually used for benefit. So there’s some bits of evidence to show that being on a ketogenic diet can help people who suffer from epilepsy for example. But for the general public the ketogenic diet is quite dangerous, your body when it’s producing ketone bodies it’s not in a normal state and so actually for the general public, the ketogenic diet is quite damaging. Produced by Jasper Pickering. Camera by David Ibekwe. Research by Fraser Moore. Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know Before Going On A Low-carb Diet

Everything You Need To Know Before Going On A Low-carb Diet

Much like Oprah, we LOVE bread. So naturally, the thought of cutting it out of our lives (along with any other carbs) is terrifying. But then again, if everyone and their mom (and lots of scientific research) claim that quitting carbohydrates is the key to weight loss, there's got to be something to it, right? Whether it takes the form of Atkins or the Paleo Diet, the low-carb trend has been around for a long time. But chances are you might not fully understand where it came from, how it works, and why experts are torn on whether this eating plan is smart. Here, we break down all of that so you can decide if carb-cutting in the name of weight loss is worth it. What Low Carb Actually Means Depending on who you talk to, there are different definitions of a low-carb diet. Plans can range from 100 grams of carbohydrates per day to zero grams (yikes), says Susan Kleiner, Ph.D, R.D., author of Power Eating. To put that into perspective, a small piece of fruit has about 15 grams of carbs and a banana contains up to 30 grams. For the sake of this article, though, we'll talk about a diet containing 100 grams of carbs per day, for someone who exercises three times a week at a moderate pace. For everyone else, a true low-carb diet would be about 50 grams per day, says Kleiner. What’s Considered a Carb? Unfortunately for Regina George, butter is not a carb. But according to the USDA’s Nutrient Database, lots of foods, including fruits and veggies, contain high amounts of carbohydrates. Though you probably know potatoes and bananas are packed with the carbohydrates, over 20 grams of the macronutrient are also found in a serving of grapes, apples, pears, and cauliflower. Plus, dried fruits, such as apricots, cranberries, and raisins, have a whopping 80 grams per serving. You’ll Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet: Fat Or Fiction?

Low Carb Diet: Fat Or Fiction?

The low carbohydrate diet has become nothing short of a phenomenon in recent years. Many members of the dieting public have lost substantial amounts of weight adhering to a low carb regimen, and they've been assured that their new eating choices have also created a meaningful dent in their risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes and other chronic health issues. But is such a diet safe and effective in the long term? That's the question posed by the documentary Low Carb Diet: Fat or Fiction? This Australian production examines the science behind the diet to determine whether it's just a fad or a healthy and sustainable trend. The public has reason to be skeptical. Years ago, the medical and dieting communities deemed fat as the ultimate culprit of our obesity woes. Unfortunately, the presence of fat accounted for a large part of the pleasure eaters received from their food. In response, the food industry countered with higher contents of sugar and other flavorful carbohydrates. Little did the public know that this influx of carbs worked to stimulate their body's production of insulin, which in turn enhanced their ability to store fat. A new and improved obesity epidemic resulted. Today, carbohydrates have become the new villain. In direct opposition to previous dietary recommendations, we're now being preached a sermon of carbohydrate reduction and an increased intake of fat. But does this represent the miracle we've all been waiting for? The film uncovers both the ying and the yang of this argument. Many experts interviewed in the film enthuse over the benefits of limiting carbs. In their view, the resulting weight loss and relief from chronic illness is absolute justification for adopting such a diet. Others worry that the long-term effects of a low carb menu might bring a Continue reading >>

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