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Do Low Carb Diets Work If Not In Ketosis

When Low-carb Paleo Isn’t Working

When Low-carb Paleo Isn’t Working

You’ve dutifully cut the carbs: there’s not a trace of sweet potato to be found on your plate, and you’re driving yourself insane measuring out allowed grams of spinach and lettuce – but it’s not working! You hunted around for more information and got the same advice: “low-carb harder! Cut carbs more! Cut protein, too! And cut fiber while you’re at it! Go on a fat fast and eat only coconut oil and egg yolks!” That might work for some people, but sometimes you’re doing low-carb right, but the pounds just won’t come off. It’s not because you’re “doing it wrong;” it’s because there’s something else going on. A word of warning: this is all intended for people who have given low-carb a serious, dedicated try. This means that: You count and track your carbs. You have accounted for carbs in all of the following: nuts/seeds, fruit, avocados, dairy (if you eat it), alcohol, and vegetables. (Now go back and read the previous sentence again to make sure you’ve accounted for all the items on that list!). You know roughly what carb level you need to maintain to get into ketosis. You have used ketostix and understand how they work. You do not have a binge eating disorder or any other psychological problem that could possibly be making you eat without realizing it, or eat things you haven’t tracked. This is not for beginners, or people who want to lose weight on a low-carb diet but aren’t sure where to start (if you have beginner questions about carbs, go here). It’s also not for people who haven’t made an all-out low-carb effort. And it’s also not for people who are freaking out over one day when the scale isn’t going down. If you haven’t stalled for at least 2 weeks, then it’s very likely a temporary plateau – or possibly it’s ho Continue reading >>

10 False Things People Say About Low-carb Diets

10 False Things People Say About Low-carb Diets

When arguing about nutrition, it can be hard to get your point across. People often seem biased against ideas that don't fit with their philosophy. When the topic of low-carb turns up, many people dismiss it, call it a "fad" diet and say that it is either harmful or impossible to stick to. Here are 10 things people say about low-carb diets that just don't make sense. I often see the claim that excluding entire food groups can be hard and that it is impossible to sustain such an "extreme" change in the way you eat. This point kind of makes sense. Not allowing yourself certain types of foods could lead to feelings of deprivation. But the thing is, all diets restrict something. They either restrict food groups or restrict calories. For some people, the calorie restriction approach may be more feasible. But it is NOT the only way. Many people don't seem to understand how low-carb diets work and what their main advantage is when it comes to weight loss. This is the fact that eating low-carb leads to automatic reduction in appetite and effortless calorie restriction (1). Compare that to the low-fat, "balanced" diet - which requires you to count calories and be hungry! This is a graph from one of the studies that compared low-carb and low-fat diets. The low-carb dieters are eating until fullness, while the low-fat dieters are calorie restricted (2). I don't know about you, but I hate being hungry. It is a very uncomfortable feeling. If I get hungry, I eat! If there is a diet plan out there that allows me to eat until fullness and still lose weight, then that sure is hell is the one I will choose. In most studies comparing low-carb and low-fat diets, more people in the low-carb groups make it to the end. If anything, they are easier to stick to. Low-carb diets are not harder to Continue reading >>

Feeling Euphoric On A Low-carb Diet? The Effect On Your Brain Is Similar To An Illicit Drug

Feeling Euphoric On A Low-carb Diet? The Effect On Your Brain Is Similar To An Illicit Drug

Feeling euphoric on a low-carb diet? The effect on your brain is similar to an illicit drug June 21, 2017 4.02pm EDT Some people on very low-carb diets say they feel euphoric, have clear minds and lose their appetite. Going low-carb might even mimic the effects of GHB – the recreational drug better known as fantasy, liquid ecstasy or grievous bodily harm – on the brain. To understand why we need to look at how the body processes a very low-carb diet, one that typically limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day. That’s one cup of rice, two slices of bread or roughly 10% of your total daily energy needs. Your body thinks it’s starving A very low-carb diet flips your metabolic switch from burning more carbs than fat, to more fat than carbs. This usually takes a few days in a process known as ketosis. During this time, your body thinks it’s starving. Once it uses up most of your glucose (carb) reserves, the body stimulates the breakdown of stored fat into fatty acids and releases them into the blood. When fatty acids reach the liver they’re converted into acetoacetate, an excellent metabolic fuel that belongs to a family of chemicals called ketones. That’s why very low-carb diets are sometimes called “ketogenic” diets. Acetoacetate decomposes to carbon dioxide and acetone, the smelly solvent best known for its ability to remove nail polish. This is why very low-carb dieters and people who are fasting often have sweet smelling breath. A healthy liver minimises the acetone lost via the lungs by converting most of the acetoacetate it produces to a more stable substance, called beta-hydroxybutyrate or BHB. And this is where those euphoric feelings could come from. BHB is almost identical to GHB, the naturally occurring neurotransmitter, called gamma- Continue reading >>

Following A Ketogenic Diet Without A Gallbladder

Following A Ketogenic Diet Without A Gallbladder

Since the 1920s, ketogenic diets have been used as a therapeutic method to treat obesity, epilepsy, diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer and many other pathological diseases (1). This very low carbohydrate diet that combines moderate protein consumption with high amounts of quality fats puts the body into a state of fat or ketone adaptation. Following a ketogenic diet without a gallbladder can pose complications because of the body’s inability to adequately secrete bile to break down fatty meals. Fortunately, these 7 strategies will answer your concerns for maintaining ketosis without a gallbladder. What Is Ketosis? When net carbohydrate consumption remains less than 50 g/day (in some cases under 30g/day), insulin concentration reduces and the body begins using stored fat for energy via lipogenesis (1). Following 3 to 4 days of this dietary carbohydrate restriction, the central nervous system (CNS) has an inadequate supply of glucose and must seek other fuel. The alternate energy source the CNS seeks along with tissues and organs is ketone bodies. These ketone bodies are produced at high concentrations in the liver during the metabolic state of ketogenesis which is also attainable during periods of prolonged fasting. The 3 major ketone bodies include acetate, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. Ketosis results in numerous health promoting benefits including: (1) Decreased fatty acid production Increased metabolism of fats and lipids Higher metabolic rate to use ketone bodies Improved mitochondrial function Modified satiety hormones including ghrelin and leptin Regulates blood lipid levels including triglycerides and cholesterol Reduced insulin signaling Improved glycemic control Reduced whole body inflammatory levels Is a Ketogenic Diet Right for You? When nutr Continue reading >>

Can Eating Mostly Fat Help You Lose Weight?

Can Eating Mostly Fat Help You Lose Weight?

Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month. The ketogenic diet didn’t start as a weight-loss method. It was a treatment for epileptic kids—one of the few that worked, especially for those who had already tried traditional medications. But odds are the only people you’ll hear talking about it today are those looking to drop a few pounds without giving up butter. Keto, as it’s known among dieters, is based around getting most of your calories from fat, some from protein, and almost none from carbohydrates. It’s like a more extreme form of Atkins, except keto actually came first. It became an epilepsy treatment back in the 1920s, whereas the weight-loss paper that inspired Dr. Atkins to establish his low-carb diet wasn’t published until 1958. The idea of eating fat in order to lose fat is obviously appealing. Oils and fats are filling and soothing, so prospective dieters feel they might not have to sacrifice as much. And everyone knows that carbs are the devil anyway, right? If it started as a medically-prescribed diet, surely it must be healthy. But like your opinion on most fad diets, your thoughts on keto are probably based on vague notions sourced from the nightly news. Food trends tend to skyrocket to fame and fall from grace before science ever has a chance to weigh in. But you should want to see solid research before you commit to a whole new way of eating. In honor of PopSci’s Fat Month, let’s do a quick refresher on what keto really is—and whether it works. What is the Continue reading >>

101 Low Carb Weight Loss Tips From The Experts

101 Low Carb Weight Loss Tips From The Experts

Who couldn’t use a little help from the experts? To make your low carb diet as fun and easy as possible, we have compiled this list of 101 Low Carb Weight Loss Tips from weight loss experts around the world, including: Cassie Bjork, RD, LD, Jill Cruz, MS, CNS, Ronesh Sinha, MD, Jill Tiffany, CN, CPT, Heidi Rasmussen, Nutritionist, BSc, Bruce Fife, ND, and 37 other outstanding and knowledgeable contributors! Whether you are a low carb novice or expert, you’ll find something here to help you achieve and maintain your ideal body weight, for life! Like these Tips? Join us for Metabolic Coaching ONLINE + 3 Months Follow Up! 1. Don’t skimp on healthy fat Submitted by Cassie Bjork, RD, LD from HealthySimpleLife.com When going low-carb it’s important to not only reduce your intake of carbohydrates, but also be sure you’re replacing the carbs with healthy fat! Healthy fat is essential for keeping you full and providing your body with energy so that you can stick with your low carb diet. One of the most common reasons people don’t stick with it is because they attempt low carb and low fat simultaneously, which is a recipe for disaster! 2. Eat when you’re hungry Submitted by Cassie Bjork, RD, LD from HealthySimpleLife.com Most diets restrict and deprive your body of energy, and when following the low carb lifestyle, your goal is the opposite. You need to fuel your body with food to keep your metabolism revved up so that your body can work for you. Any time you are hungry, your metabolism is already slowing down in attempt to conserve energy until you properly fuel it again. When you starve it, your body works against you and in turn you feel tired, cranky and will likely have difficulty concentrating and losing weight. Keep your metabolism revved up by fueling with r Continue reading >>

High Fat, Low Carb Ketogenic Diets Work, But You’ll Have To Be Disciplined

High Fat, Low Carb Ketogenic Diets Work, But You’ll Have To Be Disciplined

Source:Supplied Used clinically for many years, specifically in the area of epilepsy where it is used to help reduce seizures, ketogenic diets are also known for their relatively quick weight loss outcomes. Not a new area of nutrition but one that has become increasingly popular in recent years, the question is, ‘is a ketogenic diet the right diet for you?’ Ketogenic diets refer to diets that are particularly low in carbohydrates (ranging from 5-20%, or 20-50g of total carbohydrates and high in fats (up to 75% in total fat). This is as opposed to standard ‘diets’ which contain 30-50% carbohydrates and just 30% fat or less. Diets that are much lower in carbohydrate than the muscles and the brain typically need to function shift the body into a state known as ‘ketosis’ in which fat stores in the body are broken down into ketones which fuel the muscles and the brain in place of the carbohydrates when they are in limited supply. The result is enhanced fat burning and relatively quick weight loss as compared to a traditional dietary approaches. There is no evidence to show that keto diets are damaging to the body. In fact, with their superior weight loss and associated reductions in inflammation in the body, there are a number of benefits, particularly for individuals with high blood glucose levels, fatty liver and significant amounts of weight to lose. The primary issue with keto diets is that the total amount of carbohydrate consumed needs to be kept very low, or the body will quickly come out of ketosis. For example, a low carb diet for most of the day followed by an extra snack of chocolate or piece of banana bread will quickly negate any of the potential benefits of ketosis as the total amount of carbohydrate rises above the upper limits of 50g or so for the Continue reading >>

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

But he didn’t start dropping the pounds until a friend who had lost a lot of weight suggested he try a ketogenic diet. Gross switched to the high-fat, ultra-low-carb diet and lost 70 pounds in seven months. And he’s kept at it for five years. Though online searches about ketogenic diets started spiking last year, the diet was created in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy. When you’re on a keto diet and you’re in what’s called ketosis, a metabolic process forces the body to burn stored fat because there’s not enough glucose for energy. Fans of the keto diet say they have more energy and better focus. The diet, however, is restrictive and can be difficult to maintain. A group of local nutrition experts say the diet is safe, but they were split over whether they would recommend it for everyone. Burning fat How does the diet work? Our bodies break down carbohydrates when we eat. Those carbs are turned into glucose that fuels our cells, giving us energy. Eating keto A difficult start Continue reading >>

Carb Controversy: Why Low-carb Diets Have Got It All Wrong.

Carb Controversy: Why Low-carb Diets Have Got It All Wrong.

Ask almost anyone what they need to do to lose a few pounds, and they’ll probably say: “Cut back on the carbs.” As a nutrition coach, I’ve heard it hundreds of times. While the low carb movement has waxed and waned in popularity since the Atkins revival of the late 90s and early 2000s, most folks now assume that carbohydrates are inherently fattening. Health-conscious diners order bunless hamburgers, skip the baked potato side dish, and send the bread basket back to the kitchen. (Or don’t, and feel guilty about it.) In the past few years, I’ll bet you’ve heard (or thought) at least one of the following: Carbs spike your blood sugar and insulin, which slathers on the body fat. Carbs, especially sugar and grains, cause inflammation. Carbs are not an essential part of the diet like fat and protein. Seems simple and logical. Which is the problem. These simplistic statements about “good foods” and “bad foods” ignore biological complexity and the bigger picture. Let’s look closer. Do carbs increase insulin levels? Yes, they do. Does increased insulin after meals lead to fat gain? No. (Insulin’s actually a satiety hormone — in other words, it makes you feel full — so the idea that on its own it leads to fat gain doesn’t make sense.) Are carbs really inflammatory? That depends. Are we talking about processed corn syrup? Probably. But if we’re talking about whole grains, not really. Are carbs less important than protein, fat, and the many micronutrients that contribute to our health? Well, if you’re talking about processed carbs, the answer is a resounding yes. But if you’re talking about whole, minimally processed carbs, that’s a different story. Can a low-carb diet work to help people lose weight? Of course it can. Is it because it is lo Continue reading >>

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

Five people have recently told me they were going to “try keto”—the most recent after gushing about a mutual friend who has been doing keto, aka the popular ketogenic diet, and getting awesome-looking results. You’ve probably heard rumblings about keto, but what the heck is it? And is it too good to be true? Let’s first get you caught up on all the hubbub around the ketogenic diet. Keto is an extremely low-carb, moderate-protein, and high-fat diet. You’ll find those on keto gobbling up stuff like fat slabs of bacon, mountains of avocados, and cartons of heavy whipping cream. There’s a lot of enthusiastic fanfare around it, like this comment on Reddit: Awesome. And then there’s this one: Low-carb diets are nothing new for weight loss. And keto is kind of a low-carb diet with a twist in that you emphasize tons of fat. I spoke to Leigh Peele, NASM certified personal trainer who fields questions on all matters of weight loss, metabolism, and nutrition, and is author of Starve Mode; and she told me that the original definition of keto is a 4:1 ratio of fats to carbohydrates or protein. That is, for every gram of protein or carb you eat, you would also eat four grams of fat (hence, the avocados and heavy whipping cream). But you don’t have to stick to that exactly as long as your carbs are low and protein moderate enough to properly be “ketogenic.” Let me explain. Differences Between Keto and a Low-Carb Diet Keto’s trump card against the average low-carb diet is that, after consistently depriving yourself of bread, pasta, donuts, and any carb source, your body goes into ketosis (between a couple of days and a week). Ketosis means your body is breaking down fat and releasing large quantities of molecules called ketones into your bloodstream. Your body t Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work Well For Crossfit Training?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work Well For Crossfit Training?

Source: Stevie D Photography Have you heard of the ketogenic diet? The keto diet was originally developed by Dr. Russell Wilder in 1924 as a way to combat epilepsy. As a ketogenic diet coach, I have helped lots of people, including athletes over the years transform their physical and mental health conditions using the ketogenic diet. So, I thought I would share with you my experience with keto and some of the benefits of the diet you probably did not know about its success rates with athletes, and particularly those who are undergoing a CrossFit program. What is the Ketogenic Diet? Before we explain why keto is beneficial for crossfit, I guess I should properly explain what it is. Basically, this diet is a low carbohydrate, high fat and adequate protein diet. The ketogenic diet can help a person lose weight and improve his or her overall health, reduce blood sugar and stabilise insulin levels in the body. The ketogenic diet, sometimes called keto, share a few similarities with the Atkins Diet or the low-carb diet. The idea is that energy is burned from fats and proteins rather than from carbs. The reduction of carbs in your nutritional intake can put you in a state referred to as “ketosis.” How does the ketogenic diet work? Ketosis occurs when you eat a low carb (less than 50 grams) high protein diet, which in turns makes your body run out of glucose, which it uses as fuel. The body has no option other than to start breaking down the available proteins and fats to use for energy, creating molecules known as ketone bodies. These ketones replace glucose and are used as fuel by the muscles and the brain. This process can in return cause weight loss. A study conducted by The National Institute of Health revealed that the brain prefers ketones to glucose. Certain individ Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Urine For Ketones

How To Test Your Urine For Ketones

Are you on a diet where part of the goal is to be "in ketosis"? Some diets, such as the Atkins Diet, recommend testing to find out whether your body is generating ketones. The easiest and least expensive way to do this is to test your urine using Ketostix or a similar testing strip. Although it is not the most accurate method, it can be helpful for home testing, especially when you're new to a ketogenic diet. Testing can be a useful way to tell if you are eating something that is higher in carbohydrate than you realized. Since different people will be in nutritional ketosis with different amounts of carbohydrate (and sometimes protein), it can provide information to help you individualize your diet. It also provides motivation to stay in ketosis. Two Notes About Testing for Ketones Diabetics testing ketone levels to check for ketoacidosis will interpret the reading much differently than someone on a ketogenic diet who desires higher levels of ketones. A reduced-carb diet does not have to be ketogenic to be helpful. Many studies of non-ketogenic low-carb diets have been found to have many benefits. How to Use Ketone Testing Strips In order to test your urine, you will need ketone urine testing strips. There are many brands available, such as Ketostix and Chemstrip. The name "Ketostix" is often used to refer to any ketone testing strip, no matter the manufacturer. When you're ready to test, follow these steps: You can either pass the test end of the strip through your urine as you urinate (be sure to wet it entirely), or collect urine in a clean, dry container and dip the test strip in. Shake off excess drops of urine. Wait for 15 seconds or whatever time is stated on the brand of test strips you are using. Compare the color on your strip to the color array on the side of Continue reading >>

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

Reduce fat intake? On a low carb or ketogenic diet? Amy, have you done lost yo' mind? You know people use the abbreviation “LCHF,” right? And that means low carb high fat, right? I’ve heard from many, many people who are struggling to lose body fat on a low carb or ketogenic diet. And while there are many possible reasons for this, the simplest, most obvious, and most common one is, they’re eating too darn much fat. What is this madness you speak of? This is possible. It is, as they say, “a thing.” Remember: when you reduce your carbohydrate intake to the point that your body must switch over to running primarily on fat for fuel, you go from being a “sugar burner” to being a “fat burner.” But what this means is that you’re burning fat. It doesn’t mean that the fat you’re burning will automatically and unfailingly come from your love handles and thunder thighs adipose tissue (your stored body fat). It could be coming from your fatty coffee, avocado smoothie, fat bombs, or a heavier-than-you-realize hand with nuts, cheese, and ranch dressing. Bottom line: the more fat you eat, the less of a need your body has to tap into its stored fat to use for fuel. If you’re already lean and happy with your weight, this is no problem. You might need a bunch of fat just to maintain your weight. (I hate you. Lucky you.) But if you’re struggling with fat loss on low carb despite doing “all the right things” and being on-point with your diet, there’s a chance you’re simply overdoing the dietary fat. It’s true. If your carbs are very low, then insulin will be pretty low, which is what allows you to get into “fat burning mode.” But just because insulin is low doesn’t mean you’ll magically drop body fat regardless of how many calories you take Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

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