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Do Ketosis Strips Expire

Kicked Out Of Ketosis? The Dirty Little Secret About Ketone Testing Strips

Kicked Out Of Ketosis? The Dirty Little Secret About Ketone Testing Strips

[Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. I might receive a small commission if you purchase something by using one of those links.] Confused about how ketone testing strips actually work? Do you think you've been kicked out of ketosis because they suddenly turned tan? Many low-carb dieters have misconceptions about Ketostix and blood ketone levels, so in this post, we are going to clear out some of those myths and misunderstandings. You'll get the truth about testing strips and learn what really causes those high blood ketone levels. If you hang out at low-carb forums for any length of time, you're bound to hear again and again how someone recently got kicked out of the state of ketosis, and they are looking for a fast way to get back in. Out of all of the issues that you can have with a low-carb lifestyle, understanding ketone testing strips is one of the biggies. “I got kicked out of ketosis,” is one of the most common complaints I hear. And while that may or may not be true, depending on the situation, there are a lot of misconceptions about the role that ketones and ketone testing strips play in a low-carb diet. Even those who are using a blood meter often go by the rumors circulating around the web instead of listening to Dr. Phinney himself. For example: One of the misconceptions I've run into over the years is the idea that ketones are used to fuel the entire body. This is only true at the very beginning of your low-carb diet. When the body first runs out of glucose, the body runs on protein and ketones, but as carbohydrate restriction continues past those first few days, your body goes through a series of steps, or adaptions, that eventually result in muscle insulin resistance. This resistance to the presence of insulin allows the ketones buildin Continue reading >>

Decided To Buy Ketone Testing Strips Today And I Used One Already

Decided To Buy Ketone Testing Strips Today And I Used One Already

Tweet When we hear someone talking about peeing on a strip and watching it change color, the first thing that comes to most people’s minds is a home pregnancy test. That is of course, unless the person is a diabetic and they’re talking about ketone test strips. During our once a month trip to Costco today, when I stopped by the pharmacy for sugar tabs and lancets, my wife reminded me that I should see if I can buy ketone testing strips. I knew that they were available over the counter, because my mom bought a box for me back when I was first diagnosed in 2004. I can’t remember for sure if I ever tested for ketones or not before the strips expired. I should have picked up another box to have on hand, but since my blood sugar went low much more than it went dangerously high, I figured it wasn’t necessary (even though I still should have bought a box just in case). However, now that I have started using an insulin pump, I’ve come to learn that ketone test strips are even more important to have with my arsenal of diabetic supplies. “I think I see them on the shelf,” my wife said as she pointed to a box labeled Ketostix that had a Bayer logo on the side. When we got to the front of the line we asked the pharmacy technician if they were in fact what we were looking for. She pulled down 3 different boxes. The first two boxes of Ketostix contained the basic ketone test strips, only one box was bigger than the other. The strips in the third box tested blood glucose levels in addition to testing for ketones. I’m not exactly sure how that works, but since I already have blood glucose testing supplies, I opted for the smaller box of basic ketone testing strips. I chose the smaller box because I was hoping that I would hardly ever need to use them, especially not on Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis With Ketone Strips: Are They Accurate?

Measuring Ketosis With Ketone Strips: Are They Accurate?

Many people following keto diets want to be in ketosis, a natural state in which the body burns fat for fuel. For this reason, people are curious about whether they are doing enough (via carb restriction) to achieve this state. As a result, ketone strips are a popular tool that numerous people use as a way of measuring ketosis. However, just how accurate are they? And how do they compare to alternate methods of measuring ketones? What is Ketosis? Anyone following a standard high-carbohydrate diet will be burning glucose for energy. However, the body can use both carbohydrate and fat for fuel (1). When carbohydrate intake is very low, the body switches to burning fat for energy. As this happens, our body enters a state of ketosis. Ketosis is a natural biological state during which our body burns fat for fuel. While we are “in ketosis,” our blood levels of ketones—a by-product from the breakdown of fats—rise. Measuring these ketones (also known as ‘ketone bodies’) can, therefore, provide a hint as to how deeply our body is (or isn’t) in ketosis. For this reason, ketone strips—which measure the level of ketones—have become increasingly popular in recent times. Key Point: Ketosis is a biological state where the human body burns fat rather than carbs. What are Ketone Test Strips? For people who want to know if they’re in ketosis, ketone test strips are a cheap and simple way of detecting ketone levels. They are otherwise known as ‘ketone sticks’ and work by urinalysis to tell us the volume of acetoacetate in our urine. If you don’t know what acetoacetate is, then let’s start at the beginning. First of all, there are three types of ketone body; Acetoacetate Acetoacetate is one of the two main ketone bodies, and it is present in urine. We can test f Continue reading >>

Should You Use Expired Diabetes Test Strips?

Should You Use Expired Diabetes Test Strips?

If you have diabetes, you are probably familiar with the handy little strips you use to test your blood glucose levels. However, do you pay attention to their expiration dates and should you use expired strips? First, you must know the material they are made of in order to understand their expiration. The strips are made of plastic but coated with the enzymes glucose dehydrogenase or glucose oxidase. They are proteins made by living organism cells which do break down over time. The enzyme from the strip reacts with the blood’s glucose and converts it into an electrical current which enables the glucose meter to show the glucose concentration. So, since strips have parts of living organisms, they do expire. Factors That Affect the Expiration Date of Diabetes Test Strips Even though there’s a scheduled expiration date on diabetes test strips, you should know the factors that affect it, which include: The use of different enzymes – some companies use a less stable enzyme with a better accuracy. Others use less accurate enzymes with longer-term storage. And third, might use the cheapest alternative. Storage – the place where you keep your diabetes test strips affects their expiration date. Keeping them at a too low or high temperature could alter their performance. Humidity and exposure to air are another factors that affect their expiration. Also, make sure they nothing damages them. How much time has passed since they have expired The Accuracy of Expiration Dates If the expiration date says the strips will last until December 1st, does it mean they will give an accurate result the day before, and a wrong one the day after? Well, the reality is there’s no such accuracy that can tell the exact day the strips will expire. In fact, most manufacturers set the bar a b Continue reading >>

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

As part of your gestational diabetes management, your doctor may ask you to test for ketones in your morning urine. If you have gestational diabetes, you should know about insulin, glucose, and ketones. When you eat, your body breaks down foods into usable sources of energy. Glucose is the sugar that results. Your body needs glucose for energy and your baby needs it to grow. In order to get glucose out of your blood and into your cells, insulin is required. Insulin is a hormone that you produce in your pancreas. "In gestational diabetes, hormones produced during pregnancy can interfere with insulin and make it hard to use glucose. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the effects of the hormones, the blood sugar will rise," explains Louise McDonald, RN, clinical manager of maternity and pediatrics at Cleveland Clinic Home Care. "The body cannot use sugar without enough insulin. That causes the body to break down fats as a source of energy. Ketones are the waste products that are left over when the body burns some of its own fat for fuel. The ketones pass from the bloodstream into the urine," says McDonald. Why Are Ketones Important in Gestational Diabetes? The treatment of gestational diabetes is aimed at keeping your blood sugar under control. This is done with a combination of diet, exercise, and sometimes insulin treatment. Finding ketones in your urine is a warning sign that your blood sugar control is out of balance. High blood sugar. If you are taking in more sugar in your diet than your insulin can manage, your blood sugar goes up. This is dangerous for you and your baby. If your baby is exposed to more sugar then the baby needs, the baby will grow too fast. This condition, called macrosomia, can lead to problems during delivery. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Why You Need To Stop Worrying About The Color Of Your Ketostix

Why You Need To Stop Worrying About The Color Of Your Ketostix

Yeah, I know you like to use them, but there are so many misconceptions about what they are telling you, that I need to intervene and make sure you get it. But before I go there, let me urge you to just buy The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, and read pages 164-165. Phinney and Volek have the best description of this that has probably ever been written, and you should really just read it from them. If I could copy these pages verbatim and paste it here, I would. Seriously, it’s only a few bucks and it’s quite literally the book you want to own if you’re interested in low carb ketogenic diets. OK, while you wait for your book to arrive, let’s dig in… What ketostix measure First off, we need to understand what ketostix actually measure, and more importantly, what they don’t. Generally speaking, ketostix measure excess ketones in your urine. They are considered excess, because they are removed from your serum and shunted to your urine by your kidneys. Their caloric content is thereby wasted. Of the three types of ketones (acetate, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate) produced by your body, ketostix only measure acetoacetate. This is extremely important to understand, because it turns out that your body produces different quantities of these different types of ketones depending on how long you’ve been in ketosis. If you’ve been in ketosis for a while, you’re going to see a reduction in the “intensity” of what you register on your ketostix for two reasons: A change in the relative volume of the ketones produced/present in your body A reduction in the volume of ketones in your urine as your kidneys reduce the amount they secrete Both of these are covered below. Changes in the types of ketones you produce When you first start your ketogenic Continue reading >>

How To Prüv Your Body Contains Ketones

How To Prüv Your Body Contains Ketones

There are a lot of products out there that make some incredible claims. Many of them truly are great products, but very few (if any) actually have a way to prüv they do what they say they do. KETO-OS can prüv it. Here’s how in just under one hour. Step 1: Get a Ketone Test Strip These are Available from most pharmacies for less than $10 a set. Step 2: Consume 1 serving of KETO-OS Step 3: Use Ketone Strip 45 – 60 minutes later *Make sure you take a ‘Before’ photo, so you can compare your results. How do Ketone Test Strips Work? Ketone urine-testing strips are small plastic strips that have a little absorptive pad on the end. The pad contains a special chemical that will change color if ketones are present in the urine. The strips may change varying shades of pink to purple, or may not change color at all. Most containers have a scale on the label, with blocks of color for you to compare the strip after a certain time lapse, usually 15 seconds. Most people simply hold a strip in the flow of urine. However, this can sometimes “wash” some of the chemical away. So, some experts advise that a sample of urine be obtained in a cup or other container, then the strip dipped into it. Keep Pay attention to the expiration date. Ketone test strips can be purchased at any pharmacy, and are usually kept with the diabetic supplies. Continue reading >>

Urine Ketone Testing

Urine Ketone Testing

Your body cells use sugar for energy. Insulin must be present for your body cells to use sugar for energy. When there is not enough insulin present your cells cannot use sugar to obtain the energy they need. If your body cannot get energy from sugar, fat is used instead. When fat is broken down, ketones are made. Ketones are strong acids and are harmful to your body. Ketones in your urine may be a sign that you are developing diabetic ketoacidosis. When should you test your urine for ketones? If your blood sugar tests are higher than 250 mg/dL for two or more tests in a row If you are feeling like your blood sugar is high If you think you have an infection If you are throwing up or feel sick to your stomach If you are ill or stressed If you have Type 1 diabetes, you should always have a supply of the strips used for urine ketone testing and know how to use them. If you have Type 2 diabetes, your doctor or nurse will tell you if you need to do urine ketone testing. If you are pregnant your doctor or nurse will tell you when to test your urine for ketones. How do you test your urine for ketones? There are several products that can be used to test the urine for ketones. The test strips can be purchased at a pharmacy and usually do not require a prescription. Ketostix® test strips are commonly used to test the urine for ketones. This is the way you test with a Ketostix®: Dip the test end of the strip into fresh urine. Remove the strip from the urine and wait 15 seconds. Compare the color on the strip with the color chart on the bottle. The urine ketone test will tell you whether you have no ketones present or if you have trace, small, moderate, or large ketones present. If your urine has moderate or large ketones present, call your doctor or nurse right away. Follow the d Continue reading >>

Defining Ketones And The Ketogenic Diet

Defining Ketones And The Ketogenic Diet

What are ketones? Ketones occur when the body can no longer break down any carbohydrate, so it needs to use its stored fat to help. They are small molecules made primarily of acetone that can be dangerous if ignored. Why do we check for ketones? Ketones are especially dangerous for those of us living with type 1 diabetes because it means there is little to no insulin in our blood cells and these ketones end up pouring in to our urine and can affect our kidneys. For those of us who use an insulin pump with only short or rapid-acting insulin, if our pump malfunctions and we are sleeping, our body can form ketones more easily because we do not have any long-acting insulin on board to back us up. How do we check for ketones? Ketones can be checked in two different ways. Urine testing and using a blood meter. Ketone urine strips come in a bottle and are available from your diabetes doctor. Within 60 seconds or less, you’ll be able to see whether or not you have ketones in your body based on the color-coded strip usually on the bottle or box. Just keep in mind that like your vial of insulin, the ketone strips do expire. Blood ketone testing is done similarly to a blood glucose fingerstick except the number read will determine the level of ketones in your blood. This too is available via prescription from your doctor. Regardless of your preferred method of ketone testing, make sure you have a plan in place with your healthcare team about ketones and how to handle them. For me personally, I can physically tell when I have ketones, but I remember attending summer camp as a child, and every time my blood sugar was above 240 mg/dl having to make the trek to the infirmary and wait for the “pee lady” to tell me whether I had them or not. If I did, I had drag around a gallon of Continue reading >>

It’s A Date

It’s A Date

Oops. Our blood ketone strips expired last September. Just last week, I noticed that (all summer long) I’ve been enjoying string cheese from a warehouse club-sized package that expired in June. A friend told me that in the back of her fridge she’d found a stalk of lemongrass that she believed was three years old. And it looked like it still had potential. Back to the ketone strips: we almost never test for ketones. The last time I tested for ketones I’m pretty sure was in 2012. I know the school nurse checks whenever Bubs is over 250 mg/dL. We don’t follow that honor code at home. But today Bubs was high after an afternoon of swimming. Weird. That’s never happened before. High and double arrows up. I attributed this to he must have been out of his pump for too long and/or had weird snacks. He entered a correction. An hour later he was almost 400 with double-ups. I checked the site and everything looked perfect. On closer inspection, I saw it: the King Neptune trident-looking bit had not been clipped in all the way. Fern. I need to test for ketones! That’s when I discovered we had only the expired blood ketone strips and a plastic bottle of the pee ones that had been opened last fall. The jig will be up if Bubs starts puking and I contact the doctor on call and she asks me if he has ketones. That would be embarrassing. Also dangerous to Bubs’s health. And embarrassing. The pharmacy is currently closed, says the CVS phone robot. I will get refills tomorrow. Continue reading >>

Using Expired Test Strips

Using Expired Test Strips

Using expired test strips can save you a lot of money, but are they accurate? This is an important question for diabetics who can not afford new test strips or for those who want to know their old test strips are still safe. We tested several brands of test strips that had been expired between 1 and 5 years and found that accuracy depended upon the length of time since expiration and the brand of test strip. Test strips were tested with brand specific controls that had at least 6 months until expiration. Test strips were tested 3 times per each control solution (normal, high, low) and averages, standard deviations, and %RSD were used to determine accuracy and precision. Brands of test strips tested included: One Touch Ultra, One Touch Ultra Blue, FreeStyle Lite, FreeStyle, FreeStyle Insulinx, Accu-Chek Aviva Plus, Accu-Chek Compact, Bayer Breeze 2, Bayer Contour, Bayer Contour Next, Advocate, Element, Embrace, Liberty, Precision Xtra, TrueTest, TrueBalance, and Nova Max. Results are for educational purposes only and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Please follow the advice of your physician. Expired Test Strips Data Test strips that had been expired for 1 year or less were not found to have a statistically significant variation in readings compared to unexpired test stirps. The majority of test strips at the 2 year mark were within the control solution range with the exception of Precision Xtra. Precision Xtra test strips that had been expired for more than 1 year were very slow at absorbing the control solution and readings were neither accurate nor precise. At three years past expiration Precision Xtra test strips read on average 102 below for high controls and read low (<20 mg/dL) for low controls. Test strips that had been expired m Continue reading >>

Testing For Ketones & Type 1 Diabetes

Testing For Ketones & Type 1 Diabetes

Key points Home urine ketone testing lets people with Type 1 diabetes know if they are in danger of going into diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (High Blood Glucose). Home urine glucose testing is now only recommended for those people who can’t test their own blood glucose levels. It is a very inaccurate way of testing. Testing for ketones in your urine is an essential and very useful tool when you have Type 1 diabetes. It can save you a trip to hospital. It can also save your life. Having high levels of ketones in your body is a life threatening condition. Having ketone testing sticks and knowing how to use them enables you to pick up when your ketone levels are increasing. Once you know this is happening then you are able to manage it. See our high blood glucose Type 1 section for more on ketones and management. What ketone sticks should I use? For most purposes, the individually foil wrapped ketone sticks that you can buy from many chemists are the best. Because they are foil wrapped they are less likely to go off. Also it is easy to carry two or three strips in your blood glucose meter case. This way if you are out you will have them with you if you need them. Remember to also carry the colour guide chart with them so if you do need to test you are able to read the result! Remember to also check the expiry date on your sticks every now and again. This avoids having expired sticks at the time you most need to know what your ketone levels are. When should I test for ketones? You should test for ketones in your urine when: Your blood glucose is going up (at any level) and you are feeling unwell Your blood glucose is greater than 17mmol/L and it is not coming down (even if you feel well) You are unable to test your blood glucose but you feel unwell You develop abdominal pai Continue reading >>

59 Minute Test

59 Minute Test

You Can Prüv Your Body Contains Ketones GET A KETONE STRIP TEST Available from most pharmacies. Click here to search Google. Consume 1 serving of keto-os USE KETONE STRIP 45 – 60 minutES later *Make sure you take a ‘Before’ photo, so you can compare your results. SHARE your results on our facebook page GO TO FACEBOOK HOW DO THE KETONE TEST STRIPS WORK, AND WHERE CAN I GET THEM? Ketone urine-testing strips, also called Ketostix or just ketone sticks … are small plastic strips that have a little absorptive pad on the end. This contains a special chemical that will change color in the presence of ketones in the urine. The strips may change varying shades of pink to purple, or may not change color at all. The container will have a scale on the label, with blocks of color for you to compare the strip after a certain time lapse, usually 15 seconds. Most folks simply hold a strip in the flow of urine. However, the force of the flow can “wash” some of the chemical away, experts advise that a sample of urine be obtained in a cup or other container, then the strip dipped into it. The chemical reagent is very sensitive to moisture, including what’s in the air. It’s important to keep the lid of the container tightly closed at all times, except for when you’re getting a strip to take a reading. Make sure your fingers are dry before you go digging in! They also have an expiry date, so make note of this when you purchase the strips … that’s for the UNopened package. Once opened, they have a shelf-life of about 6 months — you may wish to write the date you opened on the label for future reference. Ketone test strips can be purchased at any pharmacy, and are usually kept with the diabetic supplies. In some stores they’re kept behind the counter, so if you don Continue reading >>

I Have 7 Boxes Of These Ketone Strips That Expire 10/31/#### And 10 Boxes Of These Text Strips That Expire 10/####. Just Wondering If Someone Doesn't Have Insurance Coverage And Wants Them Free?

I Have 7 Boxes Of These Ketone Strips That Expire 10/31/#### And 10 Boxes Of These Text Strips That Expire 10/####. Just Wondering If Someone Doesn't Have Insurance Coverage And Wants Them Free?

I have 7 boxes of these ketone strips that expire 10/31/#### and 10 boxes of these text strips that expire 10/####. Just wondering if someone doesn't have insurance coverage and wants them free? Submit Continue reading >>

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