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Do Ketones Cause Kidney Failure?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

I remember the first time I learned about the connection between a diet high in sugar and gout, kidney stones and heart disease. I was reading a book (I don’t remember which one) that was laying out the evidence that showed a clear link between sugar consumption and those diseases and it immediately peaked my interest because I didn’t know that gout was still a thing. I had only heard of old French monarchs having it and honestly didn’t know it was still around until just a few weeks before reading that book. Just a few weeks prior to reading that, I learned that my son’s Father in Law had gout and occasional kidney stones and as I read that passage in the book, I thought about calling him and telling him what I read. I decided against it and figured I would bring it up the next time I saw him at church. Unfortunately, before I ever got a chance to say anything to him, he had a heart attack. He’s fine now but I have always felt bad I didn’t immediately make a call. I realize it wouldn’t have done much given how quickly it all happened but still, I should have said something. Since then, probably the most common question I get about the ketogenic diet is whether or not it will cause kidney stones and there is definitely a connection but possibly not how you think. First let’s go over how kidney stones are formed. How Kidney Stones are Formed At one point in time it was thought that uric acid was produced solely from the breakdown of purines found in foods like liver, pork, mushrooms, anchovies, mackerel and dried beans which is why most patients that were susceptible to kidney stones or gout were put on a low purine diet. Unfortunately those diets didn’t work too well and almost always had to be supplemented with additional medications that controlled t Continue reading >>

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

A dog with a high level of ketones in his urine suffers from a condition known as ketonuria, usually resulting from a buildup of these substances in the dog's blood. A ketone is a type of acid, which, if allowed to accumulate in the blood, can lead to ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The main health conditions that can cause high ketone levels in a canine are starvation and diabetes. A dog's body breaks down the food that he eats into sugars, also called glucose, that the cells of the body use for energy. The dog's pancreas then produces the hormone insulin to regulate the amount of glucose that the body will absorb. If the insulin to regulate the glucose is insufficient, typically due to chronic diabetes mellitus, the body breaks down alternate sources of fuel for its cells; a dog's body that is starved of nutrition will do the same. One of these sources is the fat stored in the dog's body. When the body breaks down this fat, it produces as a by-product toxic acids known as a ketones. These ketones then build up in the dog's blood and also his urine, leading to ketoacidosis. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet. A dog suffering from high ketone levels in his blood and urine exhibits symptoms of weight loss, vomiting, increased thirst, decreased appetite, increased urination, lethargy, low body temperature and yellowing of the skin and gums, according to PetMD. The dog's breath may also have a sweet, fruity smell due to the presence of acetone caused by ketoacidosis, says VetInfo. To properly diagnose high ketone levels and ketoacidosis in your dog, a veterinarian will take blood tests and a urinalysis, which will also check your dog's blood glucose levels. Depending on the dog's physical condition, hospit Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About The Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

What You Should Know About The Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Though it was originally developed to treat patients with epilepsy, interest in the ketogenic diet has taken off in recent years as we've learned more about its therapeutic and health benefits. Here’s what you need to know about ‘keto’ and why some health experts believe it's good for your body — especially your brain. Fasting and other ketogenic-like diets have been used to treat conditions like epilepsy for thousands of years. And in fact, a version of the keto diet has been traced back to 500 BC. Fast forwarding a bit, Dr. Rawle Geyelin gave a 1921 presentation to the American Medical Association in which he reported on the remarkable outcomes of several children who had benefited from fasting; his patients were having fewer seizures — and the effect appeared to be long-lasting. Geyelin continued this work, and he developed a tolerable and reproducible high-fat and low carbohydrate diet now formally known as the ketogenic diet. For the next two decades, it was used by physicians to minimize seizures in their patients. Once modern antiepileptic drugs were introduced, however, the practice declined dramatically. But interest in keto was renewed about 20 years ago as a number of scientists began to study it more closely — and not just for its ability to treat epilepsy. As we’re now learning, and despite its reputation as a “starvation” diet, a keto regimen has been shown to confer a variety of benefits. The state of ketosis The ketogenic diet is essentially a way to get our bodies to enter into a condition known as ketosis. Normally, our bodies rely on glucose for fuel — the result of our moderate to high-carb diets. Carbohydrates are broken down to glucose, which gets converted into energy and transported to our muscles and organs. But when carbs ar Continue reading >>

Q. Do Ketones In Urine Mean Kidney Damage?

Q. Do Ketones In Urine Mean Kidney Damage?

Hello doctor, I am 5 feet and 5 inches, 112 lbs and eat a normal diet. I recently had a urine test with trace ketones, although negative for glucose. My test showed cloudy clarity and presence of crystals. All the other values on the urine test were normal. I also had normal blood tests. My doctor is referring me to a nephrologist. Do you think my doctor suspects a kidney disease? I researched ketones and what it means for kidney function. The more I read, the more confusing all this becomes. Thank you for any information as I wait to see a nephrologist. Hello doctor, Thanks for your reply. I am not on any drugs, nor am I having any burning or pain when urinating. My doctor has ruled out diabetes because of no glucose in the urine and normal blood glucose numbers. So, what could be the reason for ketones in urine? I had fasted for my blood test, but my doctor did not seem to think that was the reason for the presence of the ketones. My main question is, is it necessary to see a nephrologist based on my urine reports? Thank you doctor, Do ketones in urine mean kidney damage? Do you have any major concerns as a nephrologist based on my urine analysis? Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

The ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketotic, and only for a brief portion of the program. It has not been associated with kidney damage or disease in individuals who have normally functioning kidneys. Concerns regarding undue stress on the kidneys are often aimed at very low carbohydrate, very high protein ketogenic diets. Few studies have shown any actual damage, however. (Note: Although the Weight Loss portion of the ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketogenic, it is not considered to be exceptionally “high protein” for most individuals.) Dietary ketosis is among the most maligned and misunderstood concepts in nutrition medicine. Particularly among researchers who don’t actually treat patients, ketosis (the presence of ketone bodies in the urine) is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening build-up of ketone bodies due to muscle wasting and dehydration as in states of shock or uncontrolled Type 1 diabetes. In the Type 1 diabetic, the absence of insulin leads to a toxic build-up of blood glucose and an extreme break-down of fat and muscle tissue. This condition doesn’t occur in individuals who have even a small amount of insulin, whether from natural production or artificially administered. Whereas patients in ketoacidosis are closely monitored in Intensive Care Units, individuals in ketosis are amongst the healthy, active population. Dietary ketosis is a natural adjustment to the body’s reduced intake of carbohydrates as the body shifts its primary source of energy from carbohydrates to stored fat. The presence of insulin keeps ketone production in check so that a mild, beneficial ketosis is achieved. Blood glucose levels are stabilized within a normal range and there is no break-down of healthy muscle tissue. It would be diffi Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Kidney Damage, And Ketogenic Diets

Diabetes, Kidney Damage, And Ketogenic Diets

Take a look at this PBS video sent to me by one of our readers – and try not to punch your monitor near the end: So close … Okay, let’s focus on the positive for now. I was delighted to hear one of the on-screen experts explain that high glucose levels appear to cause repeated injury to the kidneys. Well-meaning people have tried to warn me over that a “high protein” diet is hard on the kidneys. Why? Because damaged kidneys leak protein. But that doesn’t mean protein is causing the damage. If your kitchen pipes start leaking water, do you assume the damage was caused by water? Of course not. The kidneys are damaged by excess glucose, and then they leak protein. I was delighted again to hear a researcher explain that ketones can be used as an alternate energy source by most cells in the body, and that on a ketogenic diet the body switches from being primarily a glucose-metabolizing machine to a fat-and-ketone metabolizing machine. As I like to explain it to people, you can be sugar-burner or a fat-burner. I find life as a fat-burner much more pleasant … more consistent energy, better mood, no more creeping weight gain, and no more ravenous hunger if I skip a meal. As I write this, I’m 23 hours into a 24-hour intermittent fasting day, and I feel fine. I was delighted yet again when the researchers speculated that removing glucose from the picture might help the kidneys recover, then discovered that putting mice on a ketogenic diet did indeed reverse the kidney damage caused by diabetes. Sure, it’s just a rodent study with results that may or may not apply to humans, but as the researcher said, it’s a proof of principle, an avenue to be explored. All right! Cool! Great story so far. I was anxiously waiting for the part where he suggests we try the same Continue reading >>

Is Kidney Disease Reversible Through Diet In People With Diabetes ?

Is Kidney Disease Reversible Through Diet In People With Diabetes ?

Anyone with diabetes and chronic kidney disease would gladly accept a treatment that could reverse their kidney disease. That’s why this topic in an article I recently ran across caught my attention. A report from Mount Sinai School of Medicine researchers indicate a ketogenic diet may help people who have kidney disease related to Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. A ketogenic diet is low in carbohydrate, high in fat and contains a moderate amount of protein. For years this type of diet has been used for seizure control in children with epilepsy. When this type of diet is consumed, the body produces ketones because fat is burned as the primary energy source. Charles Mobbs, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience and Geriatrics and Palliative Care Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, says “Our study is the first to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes. This finding has significant implications for the tens of thousands of Americans diagnosed with diabetic kidney failure, and possibly other complications, each year.” Researchers believe the ketogenic diet works by blocking the toxic effects that high glucose levels have on the kidneys. Future research to find out how the ketogenic diet works to reverse nephropathy may lead to drug therapy to mimic the ketogenic diet effect. The research may also help with treatments for other long-term diabetes complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy. A few considerations are in order before you change your current diet. These findings are from research on mice; human trials are needed before this type of diet could become a part of the treatment plan for people with diabetes. Any changes in your usual intake of carbohydrate will have an impact on glucose levels. Lower gl Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Feline Chronic Kidney Disease

Feline Chronic Kidney Disease

ON THIS PAGE: Risk Factors Home > Related Diseases > Diabetes It is not uncommon for a CKD cat to also have or develop diabetes. The dietary needs of a diabetic cat may seem incompatible with the needs of a CKD cat but the diabetes must take precedence. What is Diabetes Mellitus? Insulin is a hormone which enables the body to process food and to produce energy from it. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which: not enough insulin is produced by the pancreas; or the cat’s body cells do not properly process insulin which the pancreas has produced. As a result, the cat develops high blood sugar levels (hyperglycaemia), which eventually lead to high sugar levels in the urine (glucosuria). Diabetes may present as: uncomplicated; or diabetes with ketoacidosis (DKA) Cats with the former may only have mild symptoms, at least in the early stages, but cats with ketoacidosis are usually very ill, and may die if not treated promptly. There is another, much rarer form of diabetes called diabetes insipidus which is beyond the scope of this website. Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine has a good general overview of diabetes in cats. Feline diabetes mellitus: from diagnosis to therapy (2009) is a helpful article by Dr DL Zoran. Feline Diabetes provides detailed answers to frequently asked questions. Risk Factors Increasing age is a factor (as it is for CKD cats). Steroid-induced diabetes in cats (2013) Peterson ME Veterinary Endocrinology says "The average age at diagnosis for feline diabetes is 10 years, with a peak incidence between 9 and 13 years." Obesity in cats, as in humans, is a strong predisposing factor for diabetes. For some reason, male cats and neutered cats are more at risk of diabetes. Burmese cats in the UK and Australasia (but not the USA) appear to be mo Continue reading >>

High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis Induced By Cumulation Of Ketones, L- And D-lactate, 5-oxoproline And Acute Renal Failure

High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis Induced By Cumulation Of Ketones, L- And D-lactate, 5-oxoproline And Acute Renal Failure

Introduction: Frequent causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA) are lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and impaired renal function. In this case report, a HAGMA caused by ketones, L- and D-lactate, acute renal failure as well as 5-oxoproline is discussed. Case presentation: A 69-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with lowered consciousness, hyperventilation, diarrhoea and vomiting. The patient had suffered uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus, underwent gastric bypass surgery in the past and was chronically treated with high doses of paracetamol and fosfomycin. Urosepsis was diagnosed, whilst laboratory analysis of serum bicarbonate concentration and calculation of the anion gap indicated a HAGMA. L-lactate, D-lactate, β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone and 5-oxoproline serum levels were markedly elevated and renal function was impaired. Discussion: We concluded that this case of HAGMA was induced by a variety of underlying conditions: sepsis, hyperglycaemia, prior gastric bypass surgery, decreased renal perfusion and paracetamol intake. Risk factors for 5-oxoproline intoxication present in this case are female gender, sepsis, impaired renal function and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, chronic antibiotic treatment with fosfomycin might have played a role in the increased production of 5-oxoproline. Conclusion: Paracetamol-induced 5-oxoproline intoxication should be considered as a cause of HAGMA in patients with female gender, sepsis, impaired renal function or uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus, even when other more obvious causes of HAGMA such as lactate, ketones or renal failure can be identified. Continue reading >>

Physical Dangers And Effects Of An Eating Disorder

Physical Dangers And Effects Of An Eating Disorder

IN ENGLISH :: EN ESPAÑOL :: EN FRANÇAIS Dangers :: Deficiencies :: Substitutes Pregnancy :: Medic Alert :: Methods Heart Attack & Stroke Physical Dangers and Effects of an Eating Disorder There are many men and women suffering with all types of Eating Disorders that do not appear in any specific weight range. Those with Anorexia can be slightly overweight... while those with Compulsive Eating can be slightly underweight. Variations for all who suffer can be anywhere from extremely underweight to extremely overweight to anywhere in between. The outward appearance of anyone with an Eating Disorder does NOT dictate the amount of physical danger they are in, nor does is determine the emotional conflict they feel inside. They need not display even close to all of the below symptoms to be in danger. Behaviors Associated with Eating Disorders Starvation and restriction of food, calories and/or fat grams sometimes accompanied by self-induced vomiting, laxatives, diuretics and obsessive exercise with any food intake, or without food intake at all. also see definitions of: Anorexia | Bulimia | Compulsive Overeating Binge and Purge episodes - abnormally large intake of food followed by self-induced vomiting, intake of laxatives or diuretics, obsessive exercise and/or periods of starvation. also see definitions of: Anorexia | Bulimia | Compulsive Overeating Overeating. Binge Episodes - abnormally large, uncontrollable intake of food. also see definitions of: Anorexia | Bulimia | Compulsive Overeating ALL Eating Disorders are Dangerous It is important to understand that even though a person may be suffering specifically with Anorexia, Bulimia or Compulsive Overeating, it is not uncommon for them to exhibit behaviors from each of the three. It is also not uncommon for one Eating Di Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Diabetes, The Ketogenic Diet & Stem Cell Therapy

Diabetes, The Ketogenic Diet & Stem Cell Therapy

More and more people are getting to know the benefits of the ketogenic diet. Why? A ketogenic diet (also known as a keto diet) focuses on the benefits of a low carbohydrate, high fat nutritional program. And while this healthy, new lifestyle trend certainly does wonders with weight management, the advantages go far beyond that. A ketogenic diet has been shown to help control seizures caused by epilepsy, especially in the case of children, and appears to aid in the reversal of kidney disease related to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Stem cell therapy for diabetes is one of the most sought after treatments at the National Stem Cell Institute. So it is no wonder that the physicians and nutritional counselors at NSI have found that the ketogenic diet is a natural partner to stem cell therapy in treating this disease. Studies are showing that a well-planned keto diet may also benefit people who suffer from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Parkinson’s disease, among others. So, why is the ketogenic diet proving to be such a boon to health and a valuable addition to stem cell therapies? Let’s take a closer look at the basics: first for keto diet regimens and then for therapy using stem cells. Ketogenic Diet Basics Ketogenic is derived from the word “ketone.” Ketones are an energy source that the body can utilize. Ketone bodies are three water-soluble molecules that the liver produces. During a ketogenic diet, the ketone levels in the blood elevate. This is known as ketosis. The body’s cells can get energy from ketones, which are produced when fat levels in the blood are raised and blood sugar levels are lowered. Basically, the body turns fat into fuel instead of relying on carbohydrates. A ketogenic diet is designed to make this switch to fat burning happen. There Continue reading >>

Steve Phinney And Richard Johnson: Ketones, Uric Acid, High Fat And Health

Steve Phinney And Richard Johnson: Ketones, Uric Acid, High Fat And Health

Note from Steve Phinney: What this shows is that uric acid goes up promptly in the same time frame that ketones go up, but after 4-6 weeks, despite ketones staying up, uric acid starts to come back down. Based on these data and my clinical observations in thousands of patients, uric acid returns to or below pre-diet baseline within 6-12 weeks despite the person remaining is a state of nutritional ketosis. Thus, when I’m asked how long ketoadaptation aks, I generally respond that some aspects of it take 6 weeks or more. This graph, by the way, shows blood uric acid levels from the untrained subjects (VT) and bicycle racers (MIT) at various times over 4-6 weeks of sustained carbohydrate restriction (aka keto-adaptation). LISTEN (50 Minutes) EDITOR’S NOTE: Sometimes, the divide between experts who advise against a high-fat, low-carb diet and those who recommend it seems larger than the Grand Canyon. But occasionally, top thinkers from both sides break through to discover common ground, along with new paths for exploration. With that in mind, here’s a discussion between two nationally recognized health researchers which refers to the uric data in this chart . . . and more. To see the charts in larger format, click on them, and they should enlarge. Before going to the transcripts of this interview, here’s more background: Dr. Steve Phinney is emeritus professor of medicine at UC-Davis and a world-renowned expert on high fat diets, including how they affect uric acid levels. Dr. RIck Johnson is a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado who’s an expert on fructose metabolism (fructose accounts for much of the sweetness in table sugar and in high fructose corn syrup). Johnson’s expertise on fructose ties him back to uric acid. Johnson writes: “Our work Continue reading >>

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