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Do Calories Matter On Keto

Keto Weight Loss

Keto Weight Loss

For anyone that is looking for a diet, the choice is overwhelming. Just go ahead and try to research it on the internet. You will find so many conflicting stories about the same plan that it is confusing. While it is always best to talk to your doctor, sometimes that can be confusing, too. A ketogenic diet, or keto weight loss, is one of those diet plans. It is more than just a diet. It is not a crash diet. It is not something that you can start and stop as you wish. To lose weight on a ketogenic lifestyle is relatively easy when you make some lifestyle changes. It really is worth it. If you want to see how a low carb diet stack up against a low fat diet, then check out this article on Ruled.me. Food Choices Keto works, but before you jump to the conclusion that all you need to do is cut your carbs, you must realize that calories matter. You can’t just hope to teach your body to run on ketones and then eat whatever you want. There will be a point when your keto weight loss will just stop, so you will need to keep your calories under control too. Now at first, simply cutting carbs will work – you will see your weight go down faster than you would imagine. One of the things that is great about a ketogenic diet is that you eat to satisfaction rather than count calories. However, I recently watched the film Miso Hungry in which a young man goes to Japan to find a healthier lifestyle. The view is that Japanese people are generally slim and therefore their diets should be healthy. He does lose weight, but after meeting with a sumo wrestler, realize that these big wrestlers eat the same food just much more of it. So yes, even though calories may be less of an issue on a low carb diet, be aware of what and how much you eat. When you first begin to make changes, it isn’t e Continue reading >>

Why Counting Calories For Weight Loss Isn’t The Answer + What I’m Doing Instead

Why Counting Calories For Weight Loss Isn’t The Answer + What I’m Doing Instead

Introduction to the new keto eating style I’ve been following for the last 14 days that has resulted in an 8 pound weight loss and a reduction in my body fat by 3%. I went on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in an effort to get my period back (more on this here, here + here). I got my period for the first time in 5 years, stayed on HRT for 8 months, gained 20 lbs and got up to a whopping 32% body fat. I accepted that if the weight gain was getting me back to health, it was worth it. Went off HRT. Got 1 period in 4 months (the endocrinologist chalked it up to “breakthrough bleeding”) and haven’t gotten one since. What I know: gaining weight didn’t help heal my hormones. Based on the results from this test, we know that my lack of periods is due to an estrogen imbalance. More on this later. Today, we talk weight loss. So here I am. No periods + 20 extra pounds at my waistline and recovering from a state of excess progesterone (brought on by HRT). Why the extra poundage? Progesterone increases fat cell COUNT – the same action that happens when women transition into puberty, pregnancy and menopause. Once you have new fat cells, they stick with you for life. They can only grow or get smaller but not disappear. And when you gain more fat cells as a result of hormone irregularities, they’re a bitch to shrink, I’m learning. I want to be clear here — I’m not saying that gaining 20 pounds is bad or that 32% body fat is a horrible place to be. It’s just not MY place to be. Last month when my hips wouldn’t fit into a pair of last summers’ shorts, I didn’t call myself “fat” or “disgusting”, I just looked in the mirror and said, firmly, “My current state is no longer a reflection of the commitment I’ve made to take care of myself. From that da Continue reading >>

The Militant Among Us

The Militant Among Us

The Internet is a very interesting place. By interesting, I mean, cool, weird, fun, crazy, smart, clever, insane, quirky, funny, puzzling, perplexing, hilarious, stupid, and ……. on and on. The LCHF/Keto forums online are a blessing and a curse to me. I love when I find nuggets of wisdom, a yummy recipe, a success story, inspirational quotes, funnies and general feel good stuff that motivates and inspires me. I dislike the rigid, know-it-all folks who really don’t have anything to show for all their knowledge. You know the ones. “Eggs have .6 carbs!!” “Calories matter!” and they won’t let it go. Ever. They want to beat you over the head with what they know and they spend lots of time meticulously tracking every speck that goes in their mouth and they don’t let go of the old diet rules. They are dogmatic and on a diet – even if they say they aren’t on a diet – if that is how they are living their life – they are dieting. I promise you. Look, if what you are doing doesn’t work, don’t do it anymore. By that I mean, if you insist on having your once a week cheat meal or cheat day and then turn around and grumble about how slow you are losing or not losing and this Keto thing just isn’t for you; you need to stop. Stop saying what you are doing is Keto or stop the cheating and be Keto. Also, if you are that person and you are yelling at people online about how calories matter or telling people they are stupid for not counting eggs as having carbs, just stop. People don’t need your kind of advice or example. Here is how I have always operated…..I take advice from people who have accomplished something and people who have accomplished something I want to accomplish. Period. If you spout off all the facts in the world, but you haven’t had suc Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Eat Too Many Calories On Lchf?

Is It Possible To Eat Too Many Calories On Lchf?

Is it possible to eat too many calories on LCHF? The answer to this and other questions – for example, what type of exercise is best on LCHF? And what should you do if you sleep really poorly? – in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Exercising on LCHF – cardio or weights? I have just recently started this way of eating and am going to the gym five days a week. I am morbidly obese. I am enjoying the exercise, I will do a mix of boxing, HIIT circuit, PT session and cardio and weights. I have been told that cardio any more than once a week is no good and has adverse effects. Could you elaborate further on this for me if it is indeed true or is it up to the individual? For me personally, I feel that the exercise can only benefit me. On a side note, my PT actually supports this way of eating too! Christine Hi Christine! I think the exercise and the cardio is likely to benefit you. Just remember that if you’re morbidly obese then diet quality (few carbs) and only eating when hungry are the most important things, at least when it comes to weight loss. So focus on getting those right first and consider postponing exercise until those earlier habits are simple to maintain. However, if you’re confident you can do everything at once, good for you! Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Can I eat too many calories? Can I eat too many calories? My carbs are under 18 grams per day, my fat is quite high 130g – 250 grams and my protein around 80 grams. My calories are around 2,500… sometimes up to 2,800. I have 48 kg (105 lbs) to lose. My blood ketones read 0.3 – 0.4 mmol/L in the mornings and in the evening 0.6 – 1.6mmol/L. I eat no junk or processed foods or sweeteners or sugars. I am aged 59, partially disabled with fibromyalgia, CFS and arthritis. My weight loss is very Continue reading >>

All About Calories, Part 1: Do Calories Count?

All About Calories, Part 1: Do Calories Count?

If you really want to start a catfight in the Paleo world, just raise the topic of calories. Is calories in, calories out a load of baloney, or is it the only legitimate way to lose weight? Do you need to count calories for weight loss? Does a ketogenic diet work because it automatically restricts calories, or because it provides some special metabolic adaptation? As usual, the answer is complicated. And if we try to oversimplify it for the sake of a snappy catchphrase, we’re just making it harder to get to the ultimate goal: better health. So instead of getting caught up in black-and-white thinking about how calories either “count” or “don’t count,” consider that there are really two different arguments going on here: Argument 1: By the first law of thermodynamics, energy cannot be created or destroyed. Weight gain or loss physically must depend on a calorie surplus or deficit. Change in weight = calories in – calories out. Argument 2: Counting calories and increasing exercise (“eat less, move more”) is the best/only way to achieve a calorie deficit and thus lose weight. Agreeing with one of these two statements does not mean that you agree with the other. You can completely accept the calories-in/calories-out theory, but still think that counting calories isn’t the best way to get there. Alternately, you can consider calories-in/calories-out to be incomplete or even incorrect, but still think that counting calories has some value as part of the big picture. As it turns out, that’s exactly what happens, and that’s probably why very intelligent people disagree so strongly on the calorie issue. Argument 1 seems to be true, in a certain very limited sense. But Argument 2, the “eat less, move more” prescription, is so oversimplified that it’s Continue reading >>

Do Calories Matter?

Do Calories Matter?

In a word, yes. But, technically this is the wrong question. The correct question is probably closer to, “What is the impact of the calories I consume on my body’s ability to store fat versus burn fat?” The immediate follow-up question to some variant of this first question is, “Should I be counting calories?” In a word, no. But you’ll want to read this post fully to qualify that answer. Before I answer these important questions, let’s spend a few moments reviewing five key concepts. Key concept #1 – the definition of a calorie A calorie is a unit of measurement for energy content. By formal definition a calorie is the amount of heat energy required to raise one gram of water from 14.5 to 15.5 degrees Celsius at atmospheric pressure. One-thousand calories is equal to 1 kilocalorie, or 1 kcal for short. Here’s where it gets a bit tricky. Most people use the term “kilocalorie” and “calorie” interchangeably. So when someone says, “a gram of fat has 9 calories,” they actually mean 9 kcals. The important thing to remember is that a calorie (or kcal) tells you how much energy you get by burning the food. Literally. In the “old days” this is how folks figured out the energy content of food using a device called a calorimeter. In fact, to this day this is how caloric content is measured when doing very precise measurements of food intake for rigorous scientific studies. As a general rule carbohydrates contain between 3 and 4 kcal per gram; proteins are about the same; fats contain approximately 9 kcal per gram. [If you’re wondering why fats contain more heat energy than carbohydrates or proteins, it has to do with the number of high energy bonds they contain. Fats are primarily made up of carbon-hydrogen and carbon-carbon bonds, which have th Continue reading >>

Is A Calorie Deficit Necessary?

Is A Calorie Deficit Necessary?

This is a summary/extract from The Ketogenic Diet by Lyle McDonald. A popular belief states that fat can be lost on a ketogenic diet without the creation of a caloric deficit. This implies that there is an inherent ‘calorie deficit’, or some sort of metabolic enhancement from the state of ketosis that causes fat to be lost without restriction of calories. There are several mechanisms that might create such an inherent caloric deficit. The loss of ketones in the urine and breath represents one mechanism by which calories are wasted. However, even maximal excretion of ketones only amounts to 100 calories per day. This would amount to slightly less than one pound of extra fat lost per month. Additionally since ketones have fewer calories per gram (4.5 cal/gram) compared to free fatty acids (9 cal/gram), it has been suggested that more fat is used to provide the same energy to the body. To provide 45 calories to the body would require 10 grams of ketones, requiring the breakdown of 10 grams of free fatty acids in the liver, versus only 5 grams of free fatty acids if they are used directly. Therefore an additional 5 grams of FFA would be ‘wasted’ to generate ketones. However, this wastage would only occur during the first few weeks of a ketogenic diet when tissues other than the brain are deriving a large portion of their energy from ketones. After this point, the only tissue which derives a significant amount of energy from ketones is the brain. Since ketones at 4.5 calories/gram are replacing glucose at 4 calories/gram, it is hard to see how this would result in a substantially greater fat loss. Anecdotally, many individuals do report that the greatest fat loss on a ketogenic diet occurs during the first few weeks of the diet, but this pattern is not found in resea Continue reading >>

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Calorie counting is a great tool for people to use to get a rough idea of caloric intakes, as well as a way to pinpoint mistakes they might have made if they hit a plateau. You might have been told that counting calories is not needed on a ketogenic diet because it causes more weight loss than other diets. That’s not exactly true. Would you be burning more calories than a low fat diet? Most likely, but that’s because of your protein intake. What about high carb vs. low carb? The truth is, there are no studies that properly show a fat loss advantage between low carb and high carb diets. There’s been over 20 long-term studies done in the last 50 years trying to give a solid conclusion on this, but all of the results have been the same: there is no significant difference in weight loss between a low carb and high carb diet. [1][2][3] The Ketogenic Diet and How This Ties In The thing about a ketogenic diet is if you tell people to eat as much as they want, they will tend to eat slightly less than other diets. Naturally, you will eat less if you’re eating food that can satiate you easier. You will have more fullness from vegetables, satiety from protein, feel fuller for longer from the fat, and endure higher levels of thermogenesis from unprocessed foods. So what does that all mean? In a nutshell, it means that you will eat less food, and therefore less calories. Your body can dig into your fat stores, since you’re naturally restricting calories, and you’ll lose weight. With high carb diets, usually with a good amount of processed foods, you will see swings in blood glucose. This makes it easy for people to give in to cravings, and succumb to the “carb addiction” created from serotonin and dopamine. There are no magical metabolic advantages to a ketogenic die Continue reading >>

Find Your Keto Macros

Find Your Keto Macros

Fine tune your fat-burning with the perfect keto ratio. Learn the special concerns for protein and fat ratios, how to track your keto macros and where to find the wiggle room. Best keto ratio for rapid fat-burning Printable keto food pyramid Online keto calculator Printable list of keto macros: calories, fat, net carbs, protein Keto macro is short for ketosis macro-nutrient. The three keto macro-nutrients are fats, proteins and carbs. Sometimes, calories are also considered part of the equation. What’s the best keto ratio? “Best” depends on your goals. A typical keto ratio has 75% of calories from fat, 20% of calories from protein and 5% of calories from fiber-rich carbs. A Typical Keto Ratio Keto Tip: A perfect ketogenic ratio happens when the amount of protein grams are equal to or slightly great than the grams of fat. Keto Food Pyramid Keto foods center around healthy fats, with moderate amounts of protein and scant carbs. During ketosis, think of fat as a food group. The Atkins Keto Food Pyramid illustrates which of the 200 ketosis foods to enjoy liberally and which ones to limit. Click the image to view, print or save. Tracking Keto Macros Track keto macros helps identify diet stalls and plateau. Macro tracking pinpoints troublesome keto ratios in your diet. For example: Are you eating enough fat? Are you eating too much protein? Track your keto foods and find out. Keto Wiggle Room If your keto ratio is off a bit, it’s not a big deal. You have wiggle room. If some days are over and some days are under your ideal goals, it’s fine. Keep your calories in check and track your keto macros by averaging several days at a time. A single day won’t make or break your plan. Testing for Ketosis Special test strips called keto sticks (or ketostix, keto strips) are u Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis: Do Calories Matter?

Nutritional Ketosis: Do Calories Matter?

One of the main questions I had regarding nutritional ketosis is regarding the potential for weight gain despite rigid adherence to the high fat, low carb, and moderate protein model recommended by Volek and Phinney. In my reading of both of their books, they write frequently of how nutritional ketosis promotes fat burning and subsequently weight loss and body recomposition, and the benefits of ketoadaptation for athletes. But they never really satisfactorily answer the question of whether or not you can actually gain weight from nutritional ketosis and exactly how important overall caloric intake is in weight loss vs weight gain. I tried to do some research online but I didn’t really find much information out there, so I figured I’d try to ask some people that are well respected in the field. I posed this question to Robb Wolf on his website and this was his response: “I think we will see some studies looking at exactly that out of NUSI.” When I asked Jimmy Moore, this was his response: “The calorie people say over consuming them will lead to weight gain. But none of those studies examined someone with adequate levels of blood ketones (not measured) and how it impacts their weight.” And this was the Caveman Doctor, Colin Champ’s (wonderful podcast btw) thoughtful response to my question: “Based on the calorie in/out, etc. you will. I personally have tried to gain weight on it and have been unable to. Perhaps I am not eating enough calories or something else is going on (whether digestion, hormonal, or unable to reach that caloric threshold). That being said, I have self experimented with extremely high caloric intake. I think it is likely individualized because I have definitely put weight on with lower calories on a higher carb diet. Clearly this is th Continue reading >>

Keto Q&a: Do Calories Matter?, Keto Vs. Fat-adapted, Should You Fast, Exogenous Ketones, Vegetarian Keto, And More! — #008

Keto Q&a: Do Calories Matter?, Keto Vs. Fat-adapted, Should You Fast, Exogenous Ketones, Vegetarian Keto, And More! — #008

I’m taking your listener questions and rolling with them for another episode of Keto Q&A! This episode’s questions are some of the most common, yet most confusing ones out there in the keto community including calories, fasting, exogenous ketone use, and what it means to be fat-adapted. TOPICS: Keto while vegetarian or vegan Veggies and dairy on a keto diet The difference between keto and fat-adaptation Do calories matter with a ketogenic diet and adding more fat to your plate? Should you fast? My fasting experiment and story Nut consumption on a keto diet Exogenous ketone use IMPORTANT LINKS: Continue reading >>

What Happens If You Eat 5,800 Calories Daily On An Lchf Diet?

What Happens If You Eat 5,800 Calories Daily On An Lchf Diet?

What happens if you “overeat” on an LCHF diet? It’s a common question and here’s one possible answer. The young man Sam Feltham has done a three-week experiment, where he’s been eating enormous amounts of LCHF-food. On average 5794 calories daily of which “only” 10% as carbohydrates (menu). According to over-simplified calorie counting, energy expenditure isn’t affected by what you eat. All excess calories you eat will then lead to weight gain. If this were true Feltham would have gained 16.5 lbs (7.5 kg) during the three weeks, but in reality he only gained 3.5 lbs (1.7 kg). Here’s the explanation: Theory and Reality There’s a difference between calculated energy surplus and real energy surplus. Apparently Feltham didn’t have a large real energy surplus, as he didn’t gain more weight. The most likely explanation to me is that his energy expenditure increased substantially during the experiment. Maybe there are other explanations? Perhaps his body also adapted by not taking up all the nutrients he ate? I’m not surprised by the results. If you starve long term you don’t lose as much weight as simple calorie counting predicts. The body will decrease the metabolic rate. If you overeat you don’t gain that much weight. The body adapts and tries to maintain an appropriate fat mass. Some find it hard to believe in Felthams results and suggest that he’s lying. I don’t think so. There are several previous reports from people who have done similar experiments – stuffed themselves with copious amounts of LCHF-food. Weight gain tends to be small or non-existent, so Feltham’s results seem to be typical. Hormones The above applies as long as the body’s hormonal regulation is balanced. Eating large amounts of bad carbohydrates may interfere with Continue reading >>

How Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Do calories matter? How much fat can I eat to lose weight on a ketogenic diet? These are just some of the many questions I focused on when writing this post. What's the Ideal Fat Intake on a Ketogenic Diet? As most of you know, ketogenic diets are high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. The aim of the ketogenic eating is to get your body into a state known as ketosis. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: • 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), • 15-30% of calories from protein, and • 5-10% of calories from carbs. However, percentages are relative and don't say anything about the amount of calories you are eating. Percentages will give you an idea of the macronutrient composition of a diet. To determine the amount of calories, you have to look at absolute numbers - macronutrients in grams. So it's totally different to consume 4,000 kcal and 2,000 kcal on a ketogenic diet. Can I Eat less than 60% of Calories from Fat? Yes, you can. Since you only regulate your energy intake via fat when following a ketogenic diet (protein and carbs remain more or less constant), you may end up eating less than 60% of calories from fat, especially if you are trying to lose weight. This is perfectly fine. In his bestselling books and also in this video, Dr. Stephen Phinney explains the different phases of the ketogenic diet. Depending on your goal, your fat intake will vary in each phase and you will lose different amount of body fat. Weight loss slows down and it's completely natural - you will lose more weight at the beginning (water weight + accelerated fat loss) so don't get discouraged if your weight loss slows down as you get close to your target weight. Why You Need to Use a Keto Calculator Not everyone follows the keto Continue reading >>

Keto Calculator

Keto Calculator

You will see that a lot of websites pretending the be the masters of the Ketogenic Diet that are trying to tell you that there is an EXACT amount of fat, proteins and carbohydrates that you need to take or your off! This is simply not true, what really matters is the ratio of Ketogenic to Anti-Ketogenic food that you ingest. That is why we had an engineer working on this calculator to make it fully customizable !! The Right Macros I know the ketogenic diet can be quite complex to follow at first if you don't know anything about calories. I created this calculator to help you figure out how many grams of each macro-nutrient you need everyday. The nutrient intake on a ketogenic diet typically works out to about 70-75% of calories from fat, 20-25% from protein, and 5-10% from carbohydrate on a daily basis. How To Use This Calculator 1. First you'll need to know how many calories you need daily. To figure this out, just use our Daily Calorie Intake Calculator bellow and follow the instructions. It will give you the amount of calories needed to maintain your weight, to lose 1 or 2 pounds per week or to gain 1 or 2 pounds per week. Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should I Eat On Keto?

How Many Calories Should I Eat On Keto?

One of the most common questions I see about keto is “how many carbs should I eat in a day?” The next thing people usually want to know is, “how many calories should I eat in a day?” Totally reasonable. There seem to be two schools of thought on this: those who ignore calories, and those who eat at a huge deficit. But, what should you do? So, how many calories should I eat on keto? Well, the answer lies somewhere in between not counting calories at all and going crazy, and being obsessive and eating very few calories. You’ve probably figured that much out, but it’s worth stating anyway. There are many bro science-y keto advocates that preach the fallibility of the calories-in-calories-out model. And they’re not totally wrong – saying 100 calories of corn chips is the same to your body as 100 calories of broccoli isn’t really correct. Your body will get far more out of the broccoli, and it will actually decrease inflammation, whereas the corn chips will create inflammation. As a quick reminder, inflammation is basically excess water in the body, which can cause swelling and weight gain. It also puts pressure on your various organ systems. So, the general idea with foods is that we want to reduce inflammation throughout the body. What are your goals on keto? Not everyone follows a ketogenic diet to lose weight. In fact, there are many medical conditions which studies have shown to be greatly improved by the individual remaining in ketosis. So, if your goal has nothing to do with weight loss, you can pretty much stop reading this article now, and just eat however much you want. ;) For the small minority of you who are trying to actually gain weight, I’d advise a similar protocol as above, but just keep eating. For many people, weight loss is the goal, a Continue reading >>

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