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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may Continue reading >>

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  1. NicNic

    I was admitted to hospital a few weeks ago with ketoacidosis. It gave me a bit of a shock and I'm now controlling my levels much better than I had been recently. However, this (I think) is making me gain weight. Any ideas on when weight gain might stop?? (I've put on nearly a stone in 4 weeks.) I'm not overweight (at all!) but am a little obsessive about my weight/size. Thanks for help and advice!!

  2. xxlou_lxx

    Might depend on 2 things really, one being how long you had DKA and how much you actually lost through having it. I guess you will put on what you lost because your body is getting back to normal again, but unless you have changed your eating habbits then thats all you should gain i would think?

  3. randomange

    It's apparently quite common to put weight on when your control improves. The reason (to quote my DSN) is that you're no longer peeing a whole load of sugar down the toilet! If your levels were particularly high before, then a lot of the calories you were taking in weren't actually being used by your body, but once your insulin levels are right(ish ) and your blood sugars start to come down, then your body can actually process these calories properly again.

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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/he...) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/...) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Matthew McPheeters. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep... Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep... NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academys NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5... Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_...

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Acute hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, may be either the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus or a complication during the course of a known disease. Inadequate insulin replacement (e.g., noncompliance with treatment) or increased insulin demand (e.g., during times of acute illness, surgery, or stress) may lead to acute hyperglycemia. There are two distinct forms: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), typically seen in type 1 diabetes, and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), occurring primarily in type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, no insulin is available to suppress fat breakdown, and the ketones resulting from subsequent ketogenesis manifest as DKA. This is in contrast to type 2 diabetes, in which patients can still secrete small amounts of insulin to suppress DKA, instead resulting in a hyperglycemic state predominated simply by glucose. The clinical presentation of both DKA and HHS is one of polyuria, polydipsia, nausea and vomiting, volume depletion (e.g., dry oral mucosa, decreased skin turgor), and eventually mental status changes and coma. In patients with altered mental status, fingerstick glucose should always be checked in order to exclude serum glucose abnormalit Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. NicNic

    I was admitted to hospital a few weeks ago with ketoacidosis. It gave me a bit of a shock and I'm now controlling my levels much better than I had been recently. However, this (I think) is making me gain weight. Any ideas on when weight gain might stop?? (I've put on nearly a stone in 4 weeks.) I'm not overweight (at all!) but am a little obsessive about my weight/size. Thanks for help and advice!!

  2. xxlou_lxx

    Might depend on 2 things really, one being how long you had DKA and how much you actually lost through having it. I guess you will put on what you lost because your body is getting back to normal again, but unless you have changed your eating habbits then thats all you should gain i would think?

  3. randomange

    It's apparently quite common to put weight on when your control improves. The reason (to quote my DSN) is that you're no longer peeing a whole load of sugar down the toilet! If your levels were particularly high before, then a lot of the calories you were taking in weren't actually being used by your body, but once your insulin levels are right(ish ) and your blood sugars start to come down, then your body can actually process these calories properly again.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency rela Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. NicNic

    I was admitted to hospital a few weeks ago with ketoacidosis. It gave me a bit of a shock and I'm now controlling my levels much better than I had been recently. However, this (I think) is making me gain weight. Any ideas on when weight gain might stop?? (I've put on nearly a stone in 4 weeks.) I'm not overweight (at all!) but am a little obsessive about my weight/size. Thanks for help and advice!!

  2. xxlou_lxx

    Might depend on 2 things really, one being how long you had DKA and how much you actually lost through having it. I guess you will put on what you lost because your body is getting back to normal again, but unless you have changed your eating habbits then thats all you should gain i would think?

  3. randomange

    It's apparently quite common to put weight on when your control improves. The reason (to quote my DSN) is that you're no longer peeing a whole load of sugar down the toilet! If your levels were particularly high before, then a lot of the calories you were taking in weren't actually being used by your body, but once your insulin levels are right(ish ) and your blood sugars start to come down, then your body can actually process these calories properly again.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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