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Dka Vs Hhs Differences

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Handwritten video lecture on Pathogenesis, pathophysiology, signs, symptoms and treatment of Diabetes Insipidus for USMLE Step 1 and USMLE Step 2. Diabetes Insidipus is defined as low ADH which can be due to decrease production of ADH (central) or decrease response to ADH (Nephrogenic) PHYSIOLOGY OF ADH SECRETION High osmolality of the plasma activates osmoreceptors which causes production and release of ADH in hypothalamus. ADH is subsequently stored in posterior pituitary until release. ADH acts on the principal cells of the collecting ducts of the kidney. After entering the cell it activates release of aquaporin in the lumen side of the collecting ducts. This causes reabsorption of water due to high osmolality of the medulla. When the water is reabsorbed ADH leads to increase urine osmolality. CENTRAL DIABETES INSIPIDUS Decrease production of ADH by the Hypothalamus or pituitary leads to central diabetes insipidus. Neurosurgery - pituitary surgery Trauma - leads to Central Diabetes Insipidus leading to three stages, polyuria, SIADH phase and permanent diabetes insipidus Tumor, inparticular langerhan cell histiocytosis can cause diabetes insipidus and congenital syndrome such as

Question.... For Step 3 - Usmle Forum

Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic coma (HHNC) is a metabolic derangement that occurs principally in patients with adult-onset diabetes. The condition is characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperosmolarity, and an absence of significant ketosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a state of absolute or relative insulin deficiency aggravated by ensuing hyperglycemia, dehydration, and acidosis-producing derangements in intermediary metabolism. The most common causes are underlying infection, disruption of insulin treatment, and new onset of diabetes. DKA is typically characterized by hyperglycemia over 300 mg/dL, low bicarbonate (<15 mEq/L), and acidosis (pH <7.30) with ketonemia and ketonuria i mean how u make differnce in diagnosis DKA and HHS differ in presentation. If physical examination reveals dehydration along with a high capillary blood glucose level with or without urine or increased plasma ketone bodies, acute diabetic decompensation should be strongly suspected. A definitive diagnosis of DKA or HHS must be confirmed through laboratory investigation. The clinical presentation can provide helpful information for the preliminary bedside diagnosis.15 DKA usually occurs in younger, Continue reading >>

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  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
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Hyperglycemic crises: Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HHNK) versus DKA. See DKA video here: https://youtu.be/r2tXTjb7EqU This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/g... Voice by: Penelope Hammet Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or HHS, is another ACUTE and life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. It develops slower than DKA, typically in the course of several days, but has a much higher mortality rate. Like DKA, HHS is triggered when diabetic patients suffer from ADDITIONAL physiologic stress such as infections, other illness, INadequate diabetic treatment or certain drugs. Similar to DKA, the RISE in COUNTER-regulatory hormones is the major culprit. These hormones

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Author: Dipa Avichal, DO; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) isone of two serious metabolic derangements that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). [ 1 ] It is alife-threatening emergency that, although less common than its counterpart, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), has a much higher mortality rate, reaching up to 5-10%. (See Epidemiology.) HHS was previously termed hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic coma (HHNC); however, the terminology was changed because coma is found in fewer than 20% of patients with HHS. [ 2 ] HHS is most commonly seen in patients with type 2DM who have some concomitant illness that leads to reduced fluid intake, as seen, for example, in elderly institutionalizedpersons with decreased thirst perception andreduced ability to drink water. [ 3 ] Infection is the most common preceding illness, but many other conditions, such as stroke or myocardial infarction, can cause this state. [ 3 ] Once HHS has developed, it may be difficult to identify or differentiate it from the antecedent illness. (See Etiology.) HHS is characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperosmolarity, and dehydration without significant ketoac Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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A lecture on the recognition, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Use of the VA and Stanford name/logos is only to indicate my academic affiliation, and neither implies endorsement nor ownership of the included material.

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)/hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State (hhs): Novel Advances In The Management Of Hyperglycemic Crises (uk Versus Usa)

#The Author(s) 2017. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Purpose of Review Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyper- glycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) are diabetic emergencies that cause high morbidity and mortality. Their treatment dif- fers in the UK and USA. This review delineates the differ- ences in diagnosis and treatment between the two countries. Recent Findings Large-scale studies to determine optimal man- agement of DKA and HHS are lacking. The diagnosis of DKA is based on disease severity in the USA, which differs from the UK. The diagnosis of HHS in the USA is based on total rather than effective osmolality. Unlike the USA, the UK has separate guidelines for DKA and HHS. Treatment of DKA and HHS also differs with respect to timing of fluid and insulin initiation. Summary There is considerable overlap but important differ- ences between the UK and USA guidelines for the manage- ment of DKA and HHS. Further research needs to be done to delineate a unifying diagnostic and treatment protocol. Keywords Diabetic ketoacidosis .Management .Survey . Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) are hyperglycemic emergencies that Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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