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Dka Vs Hhns Chart

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Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS or HHS) nursing diabetes & pathophysiology NCLEX review on endocrine disorders of the body. HHNS vs DKA are two complications of diabetes mellitus. HHNS presents with extreme hyperglycemia (blood glucose greater than 600 mg/dL) and dehyrdation. Ketones and acidosis are not present in this condition as with diabetic ketoacidosis. The hyperglycemia hyperosmolar state can lead to a coma and even death if not treated promptly. HHNS treatment includes intravenous fluids, insulin therapy,and electrolyte replacement. This video will highlight the patho, causes, signs and symptoms, and nursing interventions for HHS. Please see the previous videos on DKA and DKA vs HHS (see the playlist below) Quiz on HHNS: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Lecture Notes for this Video: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Diabetes Lecture Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, sala

Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma (honk)

Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma (HONK) HONK can occur with very high blood glucose levels Hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma is a dangerous condition brought on by very high blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes (above 33 mmol/L). Hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma is a short term complication requiring immediate treatment by a healthcare professional. Before loss of consciousness and coma takes place, patients will display signs of very high blood sugar levels which may include: The condition of very high blood glucose without signs of ketosis may also be known as Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic State (HHS). Causes of hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma may include undiagnosed type 2 diabetes that has been developing over a number of years. Alternatively, HONK could be brought on by diabetic medication not being taken or very high blood glucose resulting from a period of illness . Treatment for hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma will include fluids being given to the patient and insulin administered intravenously. Hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma is coma resulting from very hi Continue reading >>

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  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
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Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State.

Med Klin (Munich). 2006 Mar 22;101 Suppl 1:100-5. Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Clinic II and Polyclinic for Internal Medicine, University of Cologne, Germany. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are the two most serious metabolic complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). These disorders can occur in both type 1 and type 2 DM. DKA is characterized by hyperglycemia, ketone body formation and metabolic acidosis. Precipitating causes are usually infection or insulin omission. Over the past 20 years, there has been no reduction in the DKA mortality rates, which remain between 3.4% and 4.6%. HHS is manifested by marked elevation of blood glucose, hyperosmolality and little or no ketosis. Precipitating causes of HHS are infection, undiagnosed diabetes and substance abuse. The mortality rates of the HHS remain high at approximately 15%. Basic common pathophysiological mechanisms in both conditions, which differ only in the magnitude of dehydration and degree of ketoacidosis, are the reduction in the effective insulin action combined with increased counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hor Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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My Site - Chapter 15: Hyperglycemic Emergencies In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) should be suspected in ill patients with diabetes. If either DKA or HHS is diagnosed, precipitating factors must be sought and treated. DKA and HHS are medical emergencies that require treatment and monitoring for multiple metabolic abnormalities and vigilance for complications. A normal blood glucose does not rule out DKA in pregnancy. Ketoacidosis requires insulin administration (0.1 U/kg/h) for resolution; bicarbonate therapy should be considered only for extreme acidosis (pH7.0). Note to readers: Although the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in adults and in children share general principles, there are significant differences in their application, largely related to the increased risk of life-threatening cerebral edema with DKA in children and adolescents. The specific issues related to treatment of DKA in children and adolescents are addressed in the Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents chapter, p. S153. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are diabetes emergencies with overlapping features. With insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia causes urinary Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RedhairedNurse

    Your nursing text should point out the difference. I would tell you, but I'd just have to look it up and my books are in storage. I could also google it, but something you can also do as well. Sorry.

  2. RedhairedNurse

    http://books.google.com/books?id=aLt...um=9&ct=result

  3. Ilithya

    In HHNS, blood sugar levels rise, and your body tries to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it into your urine, your body tries to compensate. This usually happens to type 2s
    In DKA there is little to no circulating insulin. DKA occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in Type 1 diabetes because Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production in the pancreas. It is much less common in Type 2 diabetes because the latter is closely related to cell insensitivity to insulin, not -- at least initially -- to a shortage or absence of insulin. Some Type 2 diabetics have lost their own insulin production and must take external insulin; they have some susceptibility to DKA. You get acidosis in DKA because ketones lower the bloods pH.
    Does that help?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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