diabetestalk.net

Dka Symptoms

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

Spilleautomater Dka Symptoms Blood

Spilleautomater Dka Symptoms Blood

Diabetes Dka Symptoms: : Diabetes Dka Symptoms Oddly either chronic high blood sugar or sudden low blood sugar can trigger diabetic coma symptoms. DKA. High levels of ketones and high blood glucose levels can mean. DKA can happen to people with type 2 Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mgdL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry. Dka Diabetes: : The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days. DKA DIABETES The REAL cause of Diabetes (and the solution) DIABETES DKA SYMPTOMS The REAL cause opportunity to both treat and prevent type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Dka Symptoms Keep examining the blood sugar level from. Diabetes Dka Symptoms The blood sugar levels is needed to be ran down to offer energy and fuel for the body for you to do its work. Morespecific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis which can be detected through home blood symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. What is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What are the symptoms? Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed. What to do if you have symptoms of DKA. If you have high blood glucose levels and any signs of DKA you must contact your diabetes team immediately. Diabetes Dka Symptoms Pre Related Images "Spilleautomater Dka Symptoms Blood" (138 pics): Diabetic Ketoacidosis DKA: Causes DIABETES DKA SYMPTOMS The REAL cause opportunity to both treat and prevent type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Dka Symptoms Keep examining the blood sugar level from. Diabetes Dka Symptoms not have access to an improvement in your blood sugar. Diabetes Dka Symptoms When we hear various bosses at the Fed Reserve. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs when the body has no insulin. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include thirst, vomiting, confusion, dry skin, dry mou Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis Complicated By Hypocapnic Seizure

Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis Complicated By Hypocapnic Seizure

Summary In clinical practice, seizures independent of hypoglycemia are observed in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) more frequently than expected by chance, suggesting a link. However, seizures during management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have generally been considered a bad prognostic factor, and usually associated with well-known biochemical or neurological complications. We present the case of a 17-year-old girl with known T1DM managed for severe DKA complicated by hypocapnic seizure. We review the literature on this rare occurrence as well as outline other possible differentials to consider when faced with the alarming combination of DKA and seizure. Learning points: Seizures during DKA treatment require immediate management as well as evaluation to determine their underlying cause. Their etiology is varied, but a lowered seizure threshold, electrolyte disturbances and serious neurological complications of DKA such as cerebral edema must all be considered. Sudden severe hypocapnia may represent a rare contributor to seizure during the treatment of DKA. Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an endocrine emergency occurring in patients with both new-onset and established type 1 diabetes (T1DM). In brief, the diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion followed by fulfillment of biochemical criteria: Hyperglycemia (blood glucose level (BGL) >11 mmol/L); ketonuria and/or ketonemia and metabolic acidosis (pH <7.3, bicarbonate <15 mmol/L). It is a leading acute cause of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality, particularly in children (1), often due to well-described complications of treatment. The most common of these include cerebral edema, and electrolyte disturbances such as hypoglycemia and hypokalemia. Seizure activity occurring during treatment o Continue reading >>

Outcome Of Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis In South Of Iran

Outcome Of Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis In South Of Iran

Hossein Moravej1,2, Homa Ilkhanipour2*, Zahra seratishirazi2, Maryam Sadat Azargoon3 and Anis Amirhakimi 2 1M.D. Neonatal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. 2M.D. Pediatric Endocrinology Department, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. 3M.D. School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Citation: Homa Ilkhanipour, Hossein Moravej, et.al (2017) Outcome of Patients with Diabetic Ketoacidosis in South of Iran. J Endocrinol Diab. 4(2):1-6. DOI: Introduction: Diabetic Keto acidosis (DKA) is the most common cause of mortality in children with diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study is to investigate the complications of DKA and its complications in hospitalized patients in Namazi hospital, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: This study is a sectional descriptive survey. The statistical population included patients with DKA in the age range of 1 month to 18 years, who were hospitalized in Nemazee hospital in 2009 to 2013. All patients’ records were investigated to find out if there were complications of DKA. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS software. Results: Total population of patients was 224 cases 59.8% of patients had newly diagnosed diabetes. The cause of DKA in the other 40.2% of patients who were known cases of diabetes included lack of insulin injection in 16.5%, infection in 13.4%, stress of surgery or trauma in 0.9%, and unknown cause in 9.4% of the cases. The common complications included renal failure in 15 cases, coma in 2 cases, cerebral edema in 2 cases, cardiac arrhythmia in 3 cases, infection in 10 cases, and mortality in 4 cases. The mortality rate was 1.7%. There was a significant relation between mortality and low level of consciousness at admission time, hospitali Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Snap Shot A 12 year old boy, previously healthy, is admitted to the hospiral after 2 days of polyuria, polyphagia, nausea, vomting and abdominal pain. Temp is 37, BP 103/63, HR 112, RR 30. Physical exam shows a lethargic boy. Glucose is 534, Potasium is 5.9; WBC 16,000, pH is 7.13, PCO2 is 20 mmHg, PO2 is 90 mmHg. Introduction Results from absolute deficiency in insulin surge in counterregulatory homones (glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine) results in hyperglycemia and ketonemia Most common in type I diabetes Precipitated by infections drugs (steroids, thiazide diuretics) noncompliance pancreatitis Presentation Symptoms vomiting abdominal pain fruity, acetone odor severely dehydrated cerebral edema associated with high mortality in pediatric patients Evaluation Diagnostic criteria blood glucose levels > 250 mg/dL Arterial pH < 7.3 expect to see an increase in free calcium since the excess hydrogen displaces calcium from albumin Serum bicarbonate < 15mEq/L Moderate ketonuria and ketonemia Labs show: Treatment Fluids Insulin with glucose give insulin until ketones are gone, even after glucose normalizes or is below normal Replace potasium for hypokalemia caused by too much potassium being secreted in the urine as a result of the glucosuria labs may show pseudo-hyperkalemia due to transcellular shift of potassium out of the cells to balance the H being transfered into the cells give in the form of potassium phosphate rather than potasium chloride Aggresive electrolyte replacement give phosphate supplementation to prevent respiratory paralysis If mental status changes (headache, obtundation, coma) occur during treatment likely due to cerebral edema give mannitol Follow anion gap to monitor improvement Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Blood sugar levels that are too high (hyperglycemia) can quickly turn into a diabetic emergency without quick and appropriate treatment. The best way to avoid dangerously high blood sugar levels is to self-test to stay in tune with your body, and to stay attuned to the symptoms and risk factors for hyperglycemia. Extremely high blood sugar levels can lead to one of two conditions—diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS; also called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma). Although both syndromes can occur in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, DKA is more common in type 1, and HHNS is more common in type 2. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Ketoacidosis (or DKA) occurs when blood sugars become elevated (over 249 mg/dl, or 13.9 mmol/l) over a period of time and the body begins to burn fat for energy, resulting in ketone bodies in the blood or urine (a phenomenon called ketosis). A variety of factors can cause hyperglycemia (high blood glucose), including failure to take medication or insulin, stress, dietary changes without medication adjustments, eating disorders, and illness or injury. This last cause is important, because if illness brings on DKA, it may slip by unnoticed, since its symptoms can mimic the flu (aches, vomiting, etc.). In fact, people with type 1 diabetes are often seeking help for the flu-like symptoms of DKA when they first receive their diagnosis. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis may include: fruity (acetone) breath nausea and/or vomiting abdominal pain dry, warm skin confusion fatigue breathing problems excessive thirst frequent urination in extreme cases, loss of consciousness DKA is a medical emergency, and requires prompt and immediate treatment. A simple over-the-counter urine dipstick test (e.g., Keto Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Convicted Of A Dui Because Of My Dka

Asknadia: Convicted Of A Dui Because Of My Dka

Dear Nadia: I was arrested and charged with a DUI (driving under the influence) while experiencing DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) and was convicted. There was no information any doctor would elaborate on. My attorney said there was no other option than to plead guilty. Vic B Dear Vic: I am sorry to hear about you’re your conviction. Your DKA should not have turned into a conviction—as if diabetes is not expensive already. There’s much to say about what happened to you, which by the way is not a rare occurrence. Suspicion of DUI is confirmed in almost every US state and municipality by a breathalyzer test. The device, first offered in 1954, quickly became police and sheriff departments’ favorite non-invasive means of determining alcohol levels. But a major complaint against breathalyzer tests is that they can mistake DKA for high alcohol levels. Many—perhaps most—law enforcement officers are still not aware of DKA; what it is and how its symptoms can manifest as drunkenness. You didn’t say whether your attorney was one who specializes in DUI cases. An attorney who knows DUI laws well is probably also likely to know about DKA. If so, he/she can be in a good position to have the DUI charge overruled. The reason for that is even though most courts accept breathalyzer results as compelling evidence, they are receptive to a well-presented case against the charge and will dismiss breathalyzer evidence in some cases. Steps to Avoiding Future DUI Citations From your question, I’m assuming that there was not enough data or timeliness from your arrest citation for any doctor to definitively say whether you were experiencing DKA. In any future contacts with law enforcement officers you have to be able to persuade them to at least consider the possibility that they are Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells with an alternative energy source, the body breaks down adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids (FFAs) into the bloodstream. The liver subsequently converts FFAs to triglycerides and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies (i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid, b-hydroxybutyric acid) can be used as energy by the tissues when there is a lack of glucose or nutritional intake.1,2 The breakdown of fat, combined with the body's inability to use glucose, causes many pets with diabetes to present with weight loss, despite having a ravenous appetite. If diabetes is undiagnosed or uncontrolled, a series of metab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Advanced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Advanced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous condition characterized by a severe rise in blood sugar or hyperglycemia, depleted bodily fluids, shock, and in some cases unconsciousness. Coma and even death may occur if DKA is left untreated or if it becomes more severe due to excessive vomiting. Symptoms of DKA In the early stages of DKA, the affected individual appears flushed and breathes rapidly and deeply. This is called hyperventilation. As the condition progresses, the skin may turn pale, cool and clammy, dehydration may begin to set in and the heart rate may become rapid and breathing shallow. Nausea, vomiting and severe abdominal cramps. Blurred vision Fruity or pungent smelling breath due to the presence of acetone and ketones in the breath. Pathophysiology Although DKA can occur in patients with type 2 diabetes, it mainly develops in people with type 1 diabetes who need to take insulin for their condition. If individuals do not receive insulin, they will develop DKA. If there is a shortage of insulin, the body fails to use glucose in the blood for energy and instead fats are broken down in the liver. When these fats are broken down, acidic compounds called ketones are produced as a by-product. These ketones build up in the body and eventually cause ketoacidosis. Aside from missed or inadequate doses of insulin, another common cause of DKA is infection or illness as this can raise the level of hormones that counteract the effects of insulin. In addition, the dehydration caused by major injury or surgery can raise levels of these hormones. Diagnosis and treatment Blood tests are performed to check the sugar levels and blood pH, which is classified as acidic if it is below the usual 7.3. Unlike non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma, in DKA the blood and urine levels of keto Continue reading >>

More in ketosis