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Dka Quizlet Questions

Diabetes Nclex Questions

Diabetes Nclex Questions

Rationale: The patient's impaired fasting glucose indicates prediabetes and the patient should be counseled about lifestyle changes to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. The patient with prediabetes does not require insulin or the oral hypoglycemics for glucose control and does not need to self-monitor blood glucose. During a diabetes screening program, a patient tells the nurse, "My mother died of complications of type 2 diabetes. Can I inherit diabetes?" The nurse explains that a. as long as the patient maintains normal weight and exercises, type 2 diabetes can be prevented. b. the patient is at a higher than normal risk for type 2 diabetes and should have periodic blood glucose level testing. c. there is a greater risk for children developing type 2 diabetes when the father has type 2 diabetes. d. although there is a tendency for children of people with type 2 diabetes to develop diabetes, the risk is higher for those with type 1 diabetes. Rationale: Offspring of people with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The risk can be decreased, but not prevented, by maintenance of normal weight and exercising. The risk for children of a person with type 1 diabetes to develop diabetes is higher when it is the father who has the disease. Offspring of people with type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop diabetes than offspring of those with type 1 diabetes. A program of weight loss and exercise is recommended for a patient with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). When teaching the patient about the reason for these lifestyle changes, the nurse will tell the patient that a. the high insulin levels associated with this syndrome damage the lining of blood vessels, leading to vascular disease. b. although the fasting plasma glucose levels do n Continue reading >>

Adult Health - Endocrine

Adult Health - Endocrine

Home > Preview A client is brought to the emergency department in an unresponsive state, and a diagnosis of hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) is made. The nurse would immediately prepare to initiate which anticipated health care provider's prescription? 1. Endotracheal intubation 2. 100 units of NPH insulin 3. Intravenous infusion of normal saline 4. Intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate An external insulin pump is prescribed for a client with diabetes mellitus and the client asks the nurse about the functioning of the pump. The nurse bases the response on which information about the pump? 1. Is timed to release programmed doses of short-duration or NPH insulin into the bloodstream at specific intervals 2. Continuously infuses small amounts of NPH insulin into the bloodstream while regularly monitoring blood glucose levels 3. Is surgically attached to the pancreas and infuses regular insulin into the pancreas, which in turn releases the insulin into the bloodstream 4. Gives a small continuous dose of short-duration insulin subcutaneously, and the client can self-administer a bolus with an additional dose from the pump before each meal 4. Gives a small continuous dose of short-duration insulin subcutaneously, and the client can self-administer a bolus with an additional dose from the pump before each meal A client with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is being treated in the emergency department. Which findings would the nurse expect to note as confirming this diagnosis? Select all that apply. 1. Increase in pH 2. Comatose state 3. Deep, rapid breathing 4. Decreased urine output 5. Elevated blood glucose level 6. Low plasma bicarbonate level 3. Deep, rapid breathing 5. Elevated blood glucose level 6. Low plasma bicarbonate level The nurse teaches a cl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

What are the types of diabetes insipidus? Central Diabetes Insipidus The most common form of serious diabetes insipidus, central diabetes insipidus, results from damage to the pituitary gland, which disrupts the normal storage and release of ADH. Damage to the pituitary gland can be caused by different diseases as well as by head injuries, neurosurgery, or genetic disorders. To treat the ADH deficiency that results from any kind of damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary, a synthetic hormone called desmopressin can be taken by an injection, a nasal spray, or a pill. While taking desmopressin, a person should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. The drug prevents water excretion, and water can build up now that the kidneys are making less urine and are less responsive to changes in body fluids. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus results when the kidneys are unable to respond to ADH. The kidneys' ability to respond to ADH can be impaired by drugs-like lithium, for example-and by chronic disorders including polycystic kidney disease, sickle cell disease, kidney failure, partial blockage of the ureters, and inherited genetic disorders. Sometimes the cause of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is never discovered. Desmopressin will not work for this form of diabetes insipidus. Instead, a person with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus may be given hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) or indomethacin. HCTZ is sometimes combined with another drug called amiloride. The combination of HCTZ and amiloride is sold under the brand name Moduretic. Again, with this combination of drugs, one should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. Dipsogenic Diabetes insipidus Dipsogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by a defect in or damage to the thirst Continue reading >>

Med-surg Diabetes Nclex Questions Chp49

Med-surg Diabetes Nclex Questions Chp49

1.Polydipsia and polyuria related to diabetes mellitus are primarily due to a.the release of ketones from cells during fat metabolism. b.fluid shifts resulting from the osmotic effect of hyperglycemia. c.damage to the kidneys from exposure to high levels of glucose. d.changes in RBCs resulting from attachment of excessive glucose to hemoglobin. Rationale: The osmotic effect of glucose produces the manifestations of polydipsia and polyuria 2.Which statement would be correct for a patient with type 2 diabetes who was admitted to the hospital with pneumonia? a.The patient must receive insulin therapy to prevent ketoacidosis. b.The patient has islet cell antibodies that have destroyed the pancreas's ability to produce insulin. c.The patient has minimal or absent endogenous insulin secretion and requires daily insulin injections. d.The patient may have sufficient endogenous insulin to prevent ketosis but is at risk for hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. Rationale: Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) is a life-threatening syndrome that can occur in a patient with diabetes who is able to produce enough insulin to prevent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) but not enough to prevent severe hyperglycemia, osmotic diuresis, and extracellular fluid depletion. 3.Analyze the following diagnostic findings for your patient with type 2 diabetes. Which result will need further assessment? Rationale: Lowering hemoglobin A1C (to less than 7%) reduces microvascular and neuropathic complications. Tighter glycemic control (normal hemoglobin A1C level, less than 6%) may further reduce complications but increases hypoglycemia risk. 4.Which statement by the patient with type 2 diabetes is accurate? a."I am supposed to have a meal or snack if I drink alcohol." b."I am not allowed to eat any swe Continue reading >>

Multiple Choice Quiz

Multiple Choice Quiz

(See related pages) Please answer all questions 1 Cerebrospinal fluid, fluid within the eyes, joints, and body cavities, and fluid secretions of exocrine glands are all classified specifically as ______________ fluid. 2 What are the two major factors that regulate the movement of water and electrolytes from one fluid compartment to the next? B) osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus detect the increase in osmotic pressure of body fluids and signal the posterior pituitary to release ADH C) chemoreceptors in the renal tubule sense the increased viscosity of renal filtrate and signal the hypothalamus which, in turn, signals the posterior pituitary D) the juxtaglomerular apparatus senses the greater osmotic pressure in the blood and triggers the release of ADH 4 How does alcohol function as a diuretic? B) Alcohol receptors in the liver sense its presence and trigger a biochemical pathway that increases urine output to rid the body of alcohol. D) Alcohol prevents the distal convoluted tubule from reabsorbing water from the filtrate. 5 A so-called "salt craving" is primarily the result of _________________. 6 _______________ ions account for nearly 90% of the positively charged ions found in extracellular fluid. 7 The hormone aldosterone regulates the concentrations of _____________ and ______________ in the body. 8 Edema can be caused by all of these factors except ________________. 9 The imbalance known as ____________ can be caused by certain diuretic medications. 10 Which of the following does not occur as a result of a shift in the acid- base balance of the body? 12 The three most important buffer systems in body fluids include the bicarbonate buffer system, the ______________ buffer system, and the protein buffer system. 13 How is it possible for the rate and depth of breath Continue reading >>

Lewis Med Surg -diabetes Nclex Review Practice Questions

Lewis Med Surg -diabetes Nclex Review Practice Questions

B. Increased high-density lipoproteins (HDL) C. Decreased low-density lipoproteins (LDL) D. Decreased very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) Macrovascular complications of diabetes include changes to large- and medium-sized blood vessels. They include cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, and peripheral vascular disease. Increased triglyceride levels are associated with these macrovascular changes. Increased HDL, decreased LDL, and decreased VLDL are positive in relation to atherosclerosis development. A patient is admitted with diabetes mellitus, malnutrition, and cellulitis. The patient's potassium level is 5.6 mEq/L. The nurse understands that what could be contributing factors for this laboratory result (select all that apply)? A. The level may be increased as a result of dehydration that accompanies hyperglycemia. B. The patient may be excreting extra sodium and retaining potassium because of malnutrition. C. The level is consistent with renal insufficiency that can develop with renal nephropathy. D. The level may be raised as a result of metabolic ketoacidosis caused by hyperglycemia. E. This level demonstrates adequate treatment of the cellulitis and effective serum glucose control. The additional stress of cellulitis may lead to an increase in the patient's serum glucose levels. Dehydration may cause hemoconcentration, resulting in elevated serum readings. Kidneys may have difficulty excreting potassium if renal insufficiency exists. Finally, the nurse must consider the potential for metabolic ketoacidosis since potassium will leave the cell when hydrogen enters in an attempt to compensate for a low pH. Malnutrition does not cause sodium excretion accompanied by potassium retention. Thus it is not a contributing factor to this patient's potassium level. The elevated p Continue reading >>

Airway Obstruction And Asthma

Airway Obstruction And Asthma

An elderly client with pneumonia may appear with which of the following symptoms first? 2. Which of the following pathophysiological mechanisms that occurs in the lung parenchyma allows pneumonia to develop? 3. A 7-year-old client is brought to the E.R. Hes tachypneic and afebrile and has a respiratory rate of 36 breaths/minute and a nonproductive cough. He recently had a cold. From his history, the client may have which of the following? Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 4. Which of the following assessment findings would help confirm a diagnosis of asthma in a client suspected of having the disorder? 5. Which of the following types of asthma involves an acute asthma attack brought on by an upper respiratory infection? 6. A client with acute asthma showing inspiratory and expiratory wheezes and a decreased expiratory volume should be treated with which of the following classes of medication right away? 7. A 19-year-old comes into the emergency department with acute asthma. His respiratory rate is 44 breaths/minute, and he appears to be in acute respiratory distress. Which of the following actions should be taken first? 8. A 58-year-old client with a 40-year history of smoking one to two packs of cigarettes a day has a chronic cough producing thick sputum, peripheral edema, and cyanotic nail beds. Based on this information, he most likely has which of the following conditions? Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 9. The term blue bloater refers to which of the following conditions? Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 10. The term pink puffer refers to the client with which of the following conditions? 11. A 66-year-old client has marked dyspnea at rest, is thin, and uses accessory muscles to breathe. Hes tachypneic, with a prolonged expiratory p Continue reading >>

Like This Study Set?

Like This Study Set?

A client with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is being treated in the emergency department. Which findings would the nurse expect to note as confirming this diagnosis? Select all that apply. 1. Increase in pH 2. Comatose state 3. Deep, rapid breathing 4. Decreased urine output 5. Elevated blood glucose level 6. Low plasma bicarbonate level 3,5,6 Rationale: In DKA, the arterial pH is lower than 7.35, plasma bicarbonate is lower than 15 mEq/L, the blood glucose level is higher than 250 mg/dL, and ketones are present in the blood and urine. The client would be experiencing polyuria, and Kussmaul's respirations (deep and rapid breathing pattern) would be present. A comatose state may occur if DKA is not treated, but coma would not confirm the diagnosis. The nurse teaches a client with diabetes mellitus about differentiating between hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. The client demonstrates an understanding of the teaching by stating that a form of glucose should be taken if which symptoms develop? Select all that apply. 1. Polyuria 2. Shakiness 3. Palpitations 4. Blurred vision 5. Lightheadedness 6. Fruity breath odor 2,3,5 A client is admitted to a hospital with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The initial blood glucose level was 950 mg/dL. A continuous intravenous infusion of short-acting insulin is initiated, along with intravenous rehydration with normal saline. The serum glucose level is now 240 mg/dL. The nurse would next prepare to administer which item? 1. Ampule of 50% dextrose 2. NPH insulin subcutaneously 3. Intravenous fluids containing dextrose 4. Phenytoin (Dilantin) for the prevention of seizures 3 Rationale: During management of DKA, when the blood glucose level falls to 250 to 300 mg/dL, the infusion rate is reduced and a dextrose solution Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Practice Quiz #1 (40 Questions)

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Practice Quiz #1 (40 Questions)

This exam is all about Diabetes Mellitus! The purpose of this exam is to provide nurses and future nurses an overview of the disease, including its management, impact, and complications. Accomplish this 40-item NCLEX style examination and guarantee a good performance on your NCLEX. Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending. ~ Carl Bard Topics Included topics in this practice quiz are: Guidelines Follow the guidelines below to make the most out of this exam: Read each question carefully and choose the best answer. You are given one minute per question. Spend your time wisely! Answers and rationales are given below. Be sure to read them. If you need more clarifications, please direct them to the comments section. Questions See Also You may also like these quizzes: 3,500+ NCLEX-RN Practice Questions for Free – Tons of practice questions for various topics in the NCLEX-RN! Study Guides Cardiovascular System Respiratory System Nervous System Digestive and Gastrointestinal System Endocrine System Urinary System Homeostasis: Fluids and Electrolytes Cancer and Oncology Nursing Burns and Burn Injury Management Emergency Nursing Miscellaneous Recommended Books and Resources Selected NCLEX-RN review books: MUST HAVE: Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination, 7th Edition – A must have book if you're taking the NCLEX-RN. You need to have this. Saunders Strategies for Success for the NCLEX – An invaluable guide that will help you master what matters most in passing nursing school and the NCLEX. Mosby's Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN – This book has helped nurses pass the NCLEX exam for over 60 years. Practice with over 600 alternative item question formats. Prioritization, Dele Continue reading >>

Diabetes- Ati Testing

Diabetes- Ati Testing

Sort What are the risk factors for DM? Genetics may predispose an individual to the occurrence of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Toxins and viruses can predispose an individual to diabetes by destroying the beta cells leading to type 1 diabetes mellitus. Obesity, physical inactivity, high triglycerides (greater than 250 mg/dL), and hypertension may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Secondary causes of diabetes include pancreatitis and Cushing's syndrome. What are the nutritional guidelines for patient's with DM to follow when sick? ■■ Monitor blood glucose every 3 to 4 hr. ■■ Continue to take insulin or oral antidiabetic agents. ■■ Consume 4 oz of sugar-free, non-caffeinated liquid every 0.5 hr to prevent dehydration. ■■Test urine for ketones and report to provider if they are abnormal (the level should be negative to small). Call the health care provider if: ■■ Blood glucose is greater than 240 mg/dL. ■■Fever is greater than 38.9° C (102° F), does not respond to acetaminophen, or lasts more than 12 hr. What patient education should be provided for S & S of hypoglycemia? ☐☐ Treat with 15 to 20 g carbohydrates Examples - 4 oz orange juice, 2 oz grape juice, 8 oz milk, glucose tablets per manufacturer's suggestion to equal 15 g ☐☐ Recheck blood glucose in 15 min. ☐☐ If still low (less than 70 mg/dL), give 15 to 20 g more of carbohydrates. ☐☐ Recheck blood glucose in 15 min. ☐☐ If blood glucose is within normal limits, take 7 g protein (if the next meal ismore than an hour away). Example - 1 oz of cheese (1 string cheese), 2 tablespoons of peanutbutter, or 8 oz of milk Oral hypoglycemics ■■ Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors - Acarbose (Precose) and miglitol (Glyset) ☐☐ Slows carbohydrate absorpti Continue reading >>

Endocrine/diabetes Nclex Questions

Endocrine/diabetes Nclex Questions

4.intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate Primary goal achievement of HHNS is to rehydrate the client to restore fluid volume and to correct electrolyte deficiency. 572. An external insulin pump is prescribed for a client with DM and the client asks the nurse about the functioning of the pump. The nurse bases the response on which info about the pump? 1.is timed to release programmed doses of short-duration or NPH insulin into the bloodstream at specific intervals 2.continuously infuses small amounts of NPH insulin into the bloodstream while regularly monitoring blood glucose levels 3.is surgically attached to the pancreas and infuses regular insulin into the pancreas, which in turn releases insulin into the bloodstream 4.gives a small continues dose of short-duration insulin subcutaneously, and the client can self administer a bolus with an additional dose from the pump before each meal And insulin pump provides a small continuous dose of short - duration (rapid or short acting) insulin subcutaneously throughout the day and night, and the client can self-administered a bolus with an additional dose from the pump before each meal as needed. short - duration insulin is used in an insulin pump. And external pump is not attach surgically to the pancreas. 573. The client with a diagnosis of DKA is being treated in the ED. Which findings would the nurse expect to know as confirming this diagnosis? Select all that apply. In DKA, the arterial pH is lower than 7.35, plasma bicarbonate is lower than 15 mEq/L, The blood glucose level is higher than 250 mg/dL, and ketones are present in the blood and urine. The client would be experiencing polyuria, and Kussmaul's respirations would be present. A comatose state may occur if DKA is not treated, but coma would not confirm the di Continue reading >>

Dka And Hhs Flashcards | Quizlet

Dka And Hhs Flashcards | Quizlet

Admin Rapid IV NS or 1/2 NS until HD stable (15-20 mL/kg/hr for 1st hr) (4-14 mL/kg/hr after bolus) Used to reverse ECF volume depletion - restore renal perfusion Average fluid loss for DKA: 6-10 L/24 hrs Fluids alone may initially decrease BG by 35-70 mg/dL When BG reaches 250 mg/dL, add D5W to IV fluids - prevents hypoglycemia Monitor for complications such as pulmonary or cerebral edema (occurs if serum osmolality decreases too rapidly) First Check potassium. If potassium is less than 3.3 mEq/L, delay insulin until K replacement. Admin IV infusion regular insulin @ 0.1 unit/kg/hr Do not decrease blood glucose by more than 75 mg/dL/hr. Decrease between 50-75/hr Avoid too rapid decrease in blood glucose to prevent cerebral edema and increased ICP. Titrate Q1H after checking blood glucose. K+ may be low, high, or normal -> EKG changes. Fluids and insulin can decrease potassium level. Before giving iV potassium, pt must produce urine @ least 30 mL/hr. Phosphate may be low, high or normal. RBC binds O2 more tightly if phosphate is low. Indication: pH < 7.0 and or Bicarb level < 5.0 mEq/L Causes life threatening hypokalemia if acidosis is corrected rapidly. Monitor respiratory status and admin oxygen as needed Monitor GI motility...may need NG for decompression Pt at risk..monitor peripheral circulation and administer prophylactic lovenox. Monitor blood glucose at least every 4 hours Test urine for ketones when blood glucose level is greater than 240 Continue to take insulin or oral antidiabetic agents To prevent dehydration, drink 8-12 ounces of sugar-free liquids every hour that you are awake. Continue to eat meals at regular times. If unable to tolerate solid food because of nausea, consume more easily tolerated foods or liquids equal to carb content of usual meal. Cal Continue reading >>

Dka/hhns

Dka/hhns

Sort Metabolic acidosis HCO3 <22 pH <7.35 paCO2 normal (uncompensated) paCO2 <35 (partially compensated) pH 7.35-7.39 (acidic normal) & paCO2 <35 (fully compensated) "If ill, take your insulin and drink clear liquids with carbohydrate." The client must be familiar with "sick day" management. He should take his insulin, check his blood glucose every 1 to 4 hr, and if unable to eat solid food, take in small frequent amounts of fluids and glucose-containing beverages. Which of the following is an appropriate client instruction regarding DKA prevention? Abdominal pain The client with HHNS would not have abdominal pain, a symptom of acidosis. Confusion from dehydration would be present, as would thirst and frequent urination. Which of the following signs and symptoms is least likely in HHNS? Metabolic acidosis secondary to breakdown of fats for energy manifested by ketosis is most likely. Rapid, deep respirations (Kussmaul's respirations) will show compensation for the acidosis as the body "blows off" carbon dioxide, a respiratory acid. What type of acid-base imbalance is likely in a client with DKA? How would the nurse recognize compensation for this acid-base disorder? Physical and/or psychological stress stimulates the sympathetic nervous system's fight or flight response. This results in an increased production of catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine), which stimulate the release of cortisol. This results in glycolysis, the breakdown of glycogen into glucose. What is the relationship between stress and blood glucose levels in a client with diabetes? The nurse's first action should be to assess whether the client is adherent to the currently prescribed diet and medications. The client's current diet and medication use have not been successful in keeping glucose Continue reading >>

Nclex Style Practice Questions - Medsurg Diabetes

Nclex Style Practice Questions - Medsurg Diabetes

The guidelines for Carbohydrate Counting as medical nutrition therapy for diabetes mellitus includes all of the following EXCEPT: a. Flexibility in types and amounts of foods consumed b. Unlimited intake of total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol c. Including adequate servings of fruits, vegetables and the dairy group d. Applicable to with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus b. Unlimited intake of total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol The nurse working in the physician's office is reviewing lab results on the clients seen that day. One of the clients who has classic diabetic symptoms had an eight-hour fasting plasma glucose test done. The nurse realizes that diagnostic criteria developed by the American Diabetes Association for diabetes include classic diabetic symptoms plus which of the following fasting plasma glucose levels? When taking a health history, the nurse screens for manifestations suggestive of diabetes type I. Which of the following manifestations are considered the primary manifestations of diabetes type I and would be most suggestive of diabetes type I and require follow-up investigation? a. Excessive intake of calories, rapid weight gain, and difficulty losing weight b. Poor circulation, wound healing, and leg ulcers, c. Lack of energy, weight gain, and depression d. An increase in three areas: thirst, intake of fluids, and hunger D. An increase in three areas: thirst, intake of fluids, and hunger The primary manifestations of diabetes type I are polyuria (increased urine output), polydipsia (increased thirst), polyphagia (increased hunger). The nurse is working with an overweight client who has a high-stress job and smokes. This client has just received a diagnosis of Type II Diabetes and has just been started on an oral hypoglycemic agent. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Patho

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Patho

pathophysiology ketogenesis due to insulin deficiency leads to increased serum levels of ketones anad ketonuria acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate; ketone bodies produced by the liver, organic acids that cause metabolic acidosis respiration partially compensates; reduces pCO2, when pH < 7.2, deep rapid respirations (Kussmaul breathing) acetone; minor product of ketogenesis, can smell fruity on breath of ketoacidosis patients elevated anion gap Methanol intoxication Uremic acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis Paraldehyde ingestions Intoxicants (salicyclate, ethylene glycol, nipride, epinephrine, norepinephrine) Lactic acidosis (drug induced; didanosine, iron, isoniazid, metformin, zidovudine) Ethanol ketoacidosis Severe renal failure starvation Blood glucose regulation (6) 1. When blood glucose levels rise above a set point, 2. the pancreas secretes insulin into the blood. 3. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle cells to make glycogen, dropping blood glucose levels. 4. When glucose levels drop below a set point, 5. the pancreas secretes glucagon into the blood. 6. Glucagon promotes the breakdown of glycogen and the release of glucose into the blood. (The pancreas signals distant cells to regulate levels in the blood = endocrine function.) Insulin and Glucagon (Regulation) (10) 1. High blood glucose 2. Beta cells 3. Insulin 4. Glucose enters cell 5. Blood glucose lowered 6. Low blood glucose 7. Alpha cells 8. Glucagon 9. Liver releases glucose from glycogen 10. Blood glucose raised What is the manifestations (symptoms) of Type 1? (10) 1. Extreme thirst 2. Frequent urination 3. Drowsiness, lethargy 4. Sugar in urine 5. Sudden vision change 6. Increased appetite 7. Sudden weight loss 8. Fruity, sweet, or wine like odor on breath 9. Heavy, laboured breathing 10. Stupor, unconscious Continue reading >>

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