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Dka Patient Education

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Having diabetes means that there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. When you eat food, your body breaks down much of the food into glucose. Your blood carries the glucose to the cells of your body. An organ in your upper belly, called the pancreas, makes and releases a hormone called insulin when it detects glucose. Your body uses insulin to help move the glucose from the bloodstream into the cells for energy. When your body does not make insulin (type 1 diabetes), or has trouble using insulin (type 2 diabetes), glucose cannot get into your cells. The glucose level in your blood goes up. Too much glucose in your blood (also called hyperglycemia or high blood sugar) can cause many problems. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for a problem called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). It is very rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA happens when your body does not have enough insulin to move glucose into your cells, and your body begins to burn fat for energy. The burning of fats causes a build-up of dangerous levels of ketones in the blood. At the same time, sugar also builds up in the blood. DKA is an emergency that must be treated right away. If it is not treated right away, Continue reading >>

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  1. hankjam

    I've been low carbing for a couple of years now and got through the bad breath, I think.... yet my my tongue recently has been feeling slightly out of sorts... as if it is sandpaper and my mouth, like I've been sucking a pickled onion...
    I don't have a device for measuring my ketones.... and am wondering if mouth and low carb are related.
    Cheers
    Hj

  2. Bluetit1802

    hankjam said: ↑
    I've been low carbing for a couple of years now and got through the bad breath, I think.... yet my my tongue recently has been feeling slightly out of sorts... as if it is sandpaper and my mouth, like I've been sucking a pickled onion...
    I don't have a device for measuring my ketones.... and am wondering if mouth and low carb are related.
    Cheers
    Hj Snap. The sandpaper bit, not the pickled onion bit. I don't measure ketones either. I've never felt the need or seen the point, but I am low carb about 30g a day, some days a lot less, other days a bit more.

  3. Bluetit1802

    hankjam said: ↑
    I've been low carbing for a couple of years now and got through the bad breath, I think.... yet my my tongue recently has been feeling slightly out of sorts... as if it is sandpaper and my mouth, like I've been sucking a pickled onion...
    I don't have a device for measuring my ketones.... and am wondering if mouth and low carb are related.
    Cheers
    Hj Have you found any research or blogs about this? All I know is that it is very annoying and I start worrying it is something sinister. I'm just bumping it up in case there are others that can answer.

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Read A Core Curriculum for Diabetes Education: Diabetes Education And Program Management more detail : http://book99download.com/get.php?asi...

Evaluating Patient Education: A Case Study Of A Diabetes Program.

Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of a diabetic education program for patients at Stephens County Hospital in Toccoa, Georgia. An analysis of covariance is employed along with multiple classification analysis to determine the effect of the program in reducing hospital readmissions. The major finding is that the teaching program is an important variable in the reduction of readmissions. A second outcome is that the occurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) on initial admission is a second factor in determining readmissions. Patients having the benefit of instruction are less likely to experience readmission than those not being educated; those having DKA are more likely to be readmitted within six months from release than those not having this degree of loss of control. Implications of this study suggest that in designing a diabetic education program, greater attention must be focused upon the needs of the ketosis-prone patients. Continue reading >>

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  1. Shellyrm

    I have looked everywhere and can not get an answer to this question. Are pH testing strips the same as Ketostix (or any brand ketone testing strip)? If anyone knows the answer or can even tell me what reaction I should be looking for on the pH strips, it would be so helpful. Thanks!!

  2. Rosebud

    Hullo Shelly, welcome!
    No, ketones are completely different from pH. pH tests the acidity or alkilinity or your urine and that has no effect whatever on whether or not you are producing ketones.
    On a happier note, I truly don't believe there is any reason or need to purchase ketostix. They can so easily give you a false positive - or negative. For example, if you test after eating a fatty meal, after drinking alcohol or if you are at all dehydrated, you will get a positive reading which has nothing to do with fat burning. And many people lose weight very successfully who never show a positive reading on the stix.
    You can read more about Ketosis and Ketone Test Strips here: http://www.lowcarb.ca/tips/tips011.html
    Rosebud

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Patient Education In The Hospital

In Brief Recent concern about the optimum management of hyperglycemia for hospital patients has heightened awareness of necessary standards of care. Publications have confirmed that diabetes is not diagnosed or treated when detected in acute care settings, and opportunities for education are missed. Hospitalization presents an opportunity to address patients' unique urgent learning needs. In centers where quality diabetes management is a priority, education is readily available, roles are clear, and quality is monitored, evidence supports the notion that inpatient education is related to earlier discharge and improved outcomes following discharge. From the 1950s (and even earlier) to the 1970s, patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and certainly those with type 1 diabetes were admitted to the hospital for initiation of medication and nutrition therapy, as well as comprehensive patient education. Given a long stay, nurses and sometimes nurse specialists, along with inpatient dietitians, provided one-to-one instruction with multiple opportunities for patient practice. Group classes were rare in this setting, and outpatient programs were not usually available. Patients were ex Continue reading >>

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  1. Hankpiggy

    Throwaway account for obvious reasons.
    Husband (55) was just diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes (misdiagnosed for 5 years as panic attacks) but refuses to do anything about it. He had a fasting glucose test (360mg/dL) and a follow-up a1c blood test (11.4%). That's literally the only testing he's had done for it.
    As soon as the initial diagnosis came back, he "fired" his primary care physician for misdiagnosing his condition. But he refuses to talk to his new PCM about it (the PCM has threatened to drop him as a patient because of it). He insists that he'll be fine, "or if not at least I know what's going to kill me."
    Won't change his diet, which has always been high in sugar. He can drink a 2liter bottle of soda a day, jokes that the suggested serving size for cinnamon buns is "all of them," etc. I've made some sneaky changes around the house. There's no snacks in easy reach. I'm cutting down on portion sizes and cooking with fewer carbs. But I have no control over what he does when he leaves for work, and I'm sure there are daily Dunkin Donut runs and fast food lunches.
    He gets blurred vision and what we used to call panic attacks but now we're calling "blood sugar events" about once a week. They're debilitating. He's unable to function for close to an hour and then shaky for another three or four. I did notice that he had a tiny cut on his foot that took forever to heal last year. In retrospect, I should have forced him to get tested then. No cardio or other issues. We regularly go on hikes with steep grades and 1,000' changes in altitude.
    I'm scared (and super pissed off) about his attitude. How long do I have to dig this grave?

  2. Ceanot

    Unfortunately, he can live for many years with horrible complications. You need to figure out what kind of life/partner you want. Are you happy to be sneaky and watch your partner slowly kill himself; or do you want a partner who will take care of himself so he can be around to do fun things? Are you partners or are you his caregiver?

  3. cdn_SW

    I'm so sorry your going through this, you must be incredibly frustrated. In my opinion it's not about how long it will take to kill him, it's about what it will do to his quality of life. Two of the more common and horrible complications of diabetes are problems with the eyes and neuropathy. He could go blind or end up losing a limb. You mentioned a cut that took forever to heal, uncontrolled blood sugar makes you prone to infections that can be difficult to heal, he could end up losing a toe, foot, or part of his leg. Neuropathy can also be horribly painful.
    Your husband needs to get a grip on dealing with this, it's really not that difficult once you make a decision to make some changes and get the proper treatment. You may also need to let him know whether or not you feel you would be able to be his caregiver if his health goes to shit due to his own negligence. It's a harsh reality, but better to come to grips with it now than when it's too late. It's hard to give a timeline, like in many things some people seem to fair reasonably well even with horrible control, and others may do all the right things and still end up with complications. Hopefully you can talk some sense into your husband, maybe have him google some images of diabetic neuropathy or diabetic foot ulcers, and see if that is enough to scare him into doing something.

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