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Dka Pathophysiology Nursing

Sickly Sweet: Understanding Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sickly Sweet: Understanding Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life threatening condition that can occur to people with diabetes. It is observed primarily in people with type 1 diabetes (insulin dependent), but it can occur in type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) under certain circumstances. The reason for why it is not often seen in people with type 2 diabetes is because their body is still able to produce insulin, so the pathophysiology explained in the flowchart below is not as dramatic as compared to people with type 1 diabetes who do not make any insulin at all. There are various symptoms associated with DKA including: Hyperglycaemia Polyphagia (increased appetite and hunger) Polydipsia (increased thirst) Polyuria (increased urination) Glycosuria (glucose in the urine) Ketonuria (ketones in urine) Ketones in blood Sweet, fruity breath Tachypnoea leading to Kussmaul breathing (deep and laboured breathing pattern) The body tries to compensate for the ketone bodies (acid) by eliminating carbon dioxide (also an acid) thereby attempting to make the body more alkalotic to normalise the pH The compensation between the metabolic and respiratory system can be read about in this article Decreased bicarbonate The body tries to use the available bicarbonate (base) to buffer the ketone bodies (acid) in order to improve the metabolic ketoacidosis This actually worsens the situation the lower the bicarbonate becomes with a continual production of ketones Increased drowsiness/decreased level of consciousness As the pH decreases and becomes more acidotic, it has a direct effect on decreasing the level of consciousness in a person Increased urea Electrolyte disturbances Tachycardia and other cardiac arrhythmias Tachycardia is often a compensatory mechanism for the hypotension Cardiac arrhythmias a Continue reading >>

4 Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome Nursing Care Plans

4 Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome Nursing Care Plans

Risk for Fluid Volume Deficit: At risk for experiencing vascular, cellular, or intracellular dehydration. Risk Factors Decreased intake of fluids due to diminished thirst sensation or functional inability to drink fluids. Excessive gastric losses due to nausea and vomiting. Hyperglycemia-induced osmotic diuresis. Possibly evidenced by [not applicable]. Desired Outcomes Client will remain normovolemic as evidenced by urinary output greater than 30 ml/hr, normal skin turgor, good capillary refill, normal blood pressure, palpable peripheral pulses, and blood glucose levels between 70-200 mg/dL. Nursing Interventions Rationale Assess precipitating factors such as other illnesses, new-onset diabetes, or poor compliance with treatment regimen. These will provide baseline data for education once with resolved hyperglycemia. Urinary tract infection and pneumonia are the most common infections causing DKA and HHNS among older clients. Assess skin turgor, mucous membranes, and thirst. To provide baseline data for further comparison. Skin turgor will decrease and tenting may occur. The oral mucous membranes will become dry, and the client may experience extreme thirst. Monitor hourly intake and output. Oliguria or anuria results from reduced glomerular filtration and renal blood flow. Monitor vital signs: Monitor BP especially for orthostatic hypotension. Decreased blood volume may be manifested by a drop in systolic blood pressure and orthostatic hypotension. Monitor respirations, e.g., acetone breath, Kussmaul’s respirations. Acetone breath is due to the breakdown of acetoacetic acid. Kussmaul’s respiration (rapid and shallow breathing) represent a compensatory mechanism by the respiratory buffering system to raise arterial pH by exhaling more carbon dioxide. Monitor tempera Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pathophysiology, Nursing Diagnosis, And Nursing Interventions.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pathophysiology, Nursing Diagnosis, And Nursing Interventions.

Authors MeSH Adolescent Child Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Diabetic Ketoacidosis Humans Nursing Diagnosis Pub Type(s) Journal Article Language eng PubMed ID 2494085 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosistreatment & Management

Diabetic Ketoacidosistreatment & Management

Diabetic KetoacidosisTreatment & Management Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Managing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in an intensive care unit during the first 24-48 hours always is advisable. When treating patients with DKA, the following points must be considered and closely monitored: Correction of fluid loss with intravenous fluids Correction of electrolyte disturbances, particularly potassium loss Treatment of concurrent infection, if present It is essential to maintain extreme vigilance for any concomitant process, such as infection, cerebrovascular accident, myocardial infarction, sepsis, or deep venous thrombosis . It is important to pay close attention to the correction of fluid and electrolyte loss during the first hour of treatment. This always should be followed by gradual correction of hyperglycemia and acidosis. Correction of fluid loss makes the clinical picture clearer and may be sufficient to correct acidosis. The presence of even mild signs of dehydration indicates that at least 3 L of fluid has already been lost. Patients usually are not discharged from the hospital unless they have been able to switch back to their daily insulin regimen without a recurrence of ketosis. When the condition is stable, pH exceeds 7.3, and bicarbonate is greater than 18 mEq/L, the patient is allowed to eat a meal preceded by a subcutaneous (SC) dose of regular insulin. Insulin infusion can be discontinued 30 minutes later. If the patient is still nauseated and cannot eat, dextrose infusion should be continued and regular or ultrashort-acting insulin should be administered SC every 4 hours, according to blood glucose level, while trying to maintain blood glucose values at 100-180 mg/dL. The 2011 JBDS guideline recommends the Continue reading >>

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

- [Voiceover] Oftentimes we think of diabetes mellitus as a chronic disease that causes serious complications over a long period of time if it's not treated properly. However, the acute complications of diabetes mellitus are often the most serious, and can be potentially even life threatening. Let's discuss one of the acute complications of diabetes, known as diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA for short, which can occur in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Now recall that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. And as such, there's an autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas, which prevents the pancreas from producing and secreting insulin. Therefore, there is an absolute insulin deficiency in type 1 diabetes. But what exactly does this mean for the body? To get a better understanding, let's think about insulin requirements as a balancing act with energy needs. Now the goal here is to keep the balance in balance. As the energy requirements of the body go up, insulin is needed to take the glucose out of the blood and store it throughout the body. Normally in individuals without type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is able to produce enough insulin to keep up with any amount of energy requirement. But how does this change is someone has type 1 diabetes? Well since their pancreas cannot produces as much insulin, they have an absolute insulin deficiency. Now for day-to-day activities, this may not actually cause any problems, because the small amount of insulin that is produced is able to compensate and keep the balance in balance. However, over time, as type 1 diabetes worsens, and less insulin is able to be produced, then the balance becomes slightly unequal. And this results in the sub-acute or mild symptoms of type 1 diabetes such as fatigue, because the body isn Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Nclex Review

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Nclex Review

NCLEX review on Diabetic Ketoacidosis for nursing lecture exams and the NCLEX exam. DKA is a life-threatening condition of diabetes mellitus. It is important to know the differences between diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) because the two complications affect the diabetic patient. However, there are subtle difference between the two conditions. Don’t forget to take the DKA Quiz. In these notes you will learn about: Key Player of DKA Causes of DKA Signs and Symptoms of DKA Nursing Interventions of DKA Lecture on Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic Ketoacidosis Define: a complication of diabetes mellitus that is life-threatening, if not treated. It is due to the breakdown of fats which turn into ketones because there is no insulin present in the body to take glucose into the cell. Therefore, you will see hyperglycemia and ketosis and acidosis. Key Players of DKA: Glucose: fuels the cells so it can function. However, with DKA there is no insulin present to take the glucose into the cell…so the glucose is not used and the patient will experience hyperglycemia >300 mg/dL. Insulin: helps take glucose into the cell so the body can use it for fuel. In DKA, the body isn’t receiving enough insulin…so the GLUCOSE can NOT enter into the cell. The glucose floats around in the blood and the body starts to think it is starving because it cannot get to the glucose. Therefore, it looks elsewhere for energy. Liver & Glucagon: the body tries an attempt to use the glucose stores in the liver (because it doesn’t know there is a bunch of glucose floating around in the blood and thinks the body is experiencing hypoglycemia). In turn, the liver releases glucagon to turn glycogen stores into more GLUCOSE….so the patient becomes even more hyp Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes, making it a medical emergency. Nurses need to know how to identify and manage it and how to maintain electrolyte balance Continue reading >>

Management Of Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Management Of Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare yet potentially fatal hyperglycemic crisis that can occur in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Due to its increasing incidence and economic impact related to the treatment and associated morbidity, effective management and prevention is key. Elements of management include making the appropriate diagnosis using current laboratory tools and clinical criteria and coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, and electrolyte replacement through feedback obtained from timely patient monitoring and knowledge of resolution criteria. In addition, awareness of special populations such as patients with renal disease presenting with DKA is important. During the DKA therapy, complications may arise and appropriate strategies to prevent these complications are required. DKA prevention strategies including patient and provider education are important. This review aims to provide a brief overview of DKA from its pathophysiology to clinical presentation with in depth focus on up-to-date therapeutic management. Keywords: DKA treatment, insulin, prevention, ESKD Go to: Introduction In 2009, there were 140,000 hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with an average length of stay of 3.4 days.1 The direct and indirect annual cost of DKA hospitalizations is 2.4 billion US dollars. Omission of insulin is the most common precipitant of DKA.2,3 Infections, acute medical illnesses involving the cardiovascular system (myocardial infarction, stroke) and gastrointestinal tract (bleeding, pancreatitis), diseases of the endocrine axis (acromegaly, Cushing’s syndrome), and stress of recent surgical procedures can contribute to the development of DKA by causing dehydration, increase in insulin counter-regulatory hor Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1. PRESENTED BY:SHINY MATHEWHEAD NURSE MMW 2. DIABETES MELLITES Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disease results from the production of insufficient amount of insulin by the pancreas. Without insulin the body cannot utilize glucose. So creating high level of glucose in the blood and a low level of glucose absorption by the tissue. Type 1 diabetes -- insulin dependant diabetes Type2 diabetes-- Non insulin dependant diabetes 3. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSISDiabetic keto acidosis is an acute state of severeuncontrolled diabetic that requires emergencytreatment with insulin and intravenous fluids.biochemically DKA is defined as an increase in theserum concentration of ketons greater than 5meq/l a blood glucose level of greater than 250mg/l,blood PH less than 7.2 and HCO3 is 18meq/lor less. 4. PRECIPITATING FACTORS Infections Acute stroke Pancreatitis Myocardial infarction Interruption of insulin Pregnancy Dietery indiscretion Trauma and stress 5. INFECTION MISSED INSULIN DOSE STRESS NEW-ONSET DIABETES EXCESS SECRETION OF INADEQUATEGLYCOGEN AND OTHER INSULINCOUNTER REGULATORY HORMONES DCREASEINCREASED LIPOLYSIS GLYCOGENENOLYSIS GLUCOSE UPTAKE OF ADIPOSE TISSUE AND GLUCONEOGENESIS BY THE LIVER HYPERGLYCEMIA KETOGENESIS OSMOTIC KETOSIS DIURESIS VOMITING ACIDOSIS POTASSIUM LOSS DEHYDRATION 6. LACK OF INSULINDECREASED UTILIZATION INCREASEDOF GLUCOSE BY MUSCLE, BREAKDOWNFAT AND LIVER OF FATINCREASED PRODUCTION •ACETONEOF GLUCOSE BY LIVER BREATH INCREASED •POOR APPETITE FATTY ACIDS •NAUSEA HYPERGLYCEMIA INCREASED KETONE •NAUSEA BODIESBLURRED POLYURIA •VOMITING VISION •ABDOMINAL PAIN ACIDOSISWEAKNESS DEHYDRATIONHEADACHE INCREASINGLY INCREASED THIRST RAPID (POLYDIPSIA) RESPIRATIONS 7. COMMON CLINICAL FEATURES Poly urea ,poly dipsia,po Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a very serious complication of diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder that is characterized by hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased body ketone concentrations. The most common causes of DKA are infection and poor compliance with medication regimens. Other causes include undiagnosed diabetes, alcohol abuse, and a multitude of medical conditions such as cerebrovascular accident (CVA), complicated pregnancy, myocardial infarction, pancreatitis, and stress. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complicated pathology. Early recognition of DKA, a good understanding of the pathological processes of DKA, and aggressive treatment are the keys to successful treatment. With good care, DKA can be managed and the patient will survive. OBJECTIVES When the student has finished studying this module, he/she will be able to: 1. Identify the correct definition of DKA. 2. Identify a basic function of insulin. 3. Identify the insulin derangements of types I and II diabetes. 4. Identify the basic cause of DKA. 5. Identify two specific causes of DKA. 6. Identify the two pathogenic mechanisms that produce the signs/symptoms of DKA. 7. Identify metabolic consequences of increased hormone concentrations in DKA. 8. Identify the criteria used to diagnose DKA. 9. Identify common signs and symptoms of DKA. 10. Identify laboratory abnormalities seen in DKA. 11. Identify complications of DKA. 12. Identify the three most important therapies for treating DKA. 13. Identify the correct roles of sodium bicarbonate and phosphate in treating DKA. 14. Identify an important rule for using potassium replacement in DKA. 15. Identify an important rule for switching from IV to subcutaneous insulin. EPIDEMIOLOGY Most cases of DKA are seen in patients with type I diabete Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crises: Managing Acute Complications Of Diabetes

Hyperglycemic Crises: Managing Acute Complications Of Diabetes

Authors: Kim Cathcart, MS, RN, RRT | Cheryl Duksta, RN, ADN, M.Ed | Kate Biggs, RN, MSN Hyperglycemia occurs from time to time in all people with diabetes. However, at times, hyperglycemia can lead to acute, life-threatening complications known as Hyperglycemic Crises. This course is designed to educate healthcare professionals about the emergencies associated with hyperglycemic crises, including causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (HHS) and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Course objectives include: Paraphrase the pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Interpret diagnostic findings related to DKA Relate the nurse’s role in caring for patients with diabetic complications About the Authors Kim Cathcart, MS, RN, RRT, started working in the field of inhalation therapy in 1976 and by 1979 had completed her first test to become a registered respiratory therapist. She earned a bachelor's degree in general studies and a master's degree in educational administration from the University of Dayton, and later she received her bachelor's degree in nursing from Wright State University. She has taught clinicals and labs in respiratory therapy and has served as a respiratory nurse liaison. Her nursing career includes work in skilled nursing, orthopedics, and med-surg/chemical detox. She has also worked as a diabetic resource nurse and in an infectious disease/HIV clinic. Her publishing credentials include articles on respiratory care, contributions to hospital publications, and a tribute in a nursing magazine. Cheryl Duksta, RN, ADN, M.Ed, is currently a critical care nurse in an intermediate care unit in Austin, Texas. She is an active member of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Greater Austin chapter. A master' Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Rapid Identification, Treatment, And Education Can Improve Survival Rates.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Rapid Identification, Treatment, And Education Can Improve Survival Rates.

The rescue squad arrives at the emergency department (ED) with Chad Smith, 72 years old, who was found unconscious on the basement floor of his home. En route to the hospital, Mr. Smith's respirations became very shallow. An endotracheal tube was inserted, and its placement was confirmed by end-tidal CO2 detection. Since arriving at the ED, he has remained comatose and is not assisting the ventilator. His vital signs are blood pressure, 80/48 mmHg; heart rate, 112 beats per minute; and temperature, 91.8°F. He has a sinus tachycardia without ectopy. The glucometer indicates a finger stick blood sugar (FSBS) reading of “panic high.” Mr. Smith is among the 5.9% of people in the United States with diabetes. 1 A significant percentage of them will experience diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a state of hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. 2,3 DKA typically affects those with type 1 diabetes, although patients with type 2 diabetes who suffer from hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome also experience DKA, and with increasing incidence. 4,5 In January 2002, the American Diabetic Association (ADA) reported that there are approximately 100,000 hospitalizations for DKA annually. 6 It's also the leading cause of death among children with diabetes, nearly 40% of whom present with DKA in addition to new-onset diabetes. 7 The ability of emergency nurses to learn and recognize the signs and symptoms of DKA profoundly affects outcome and survival rate. In 1980, the age- adjusted death rate among patients with diabetes was 30.8 per 100,000 patients, with DKA listed as the cause of death. By 1996, this number had dropped to 20.4, a change attributed to streamlined care and modern treatment modalities. 8 DKA is initiated by trauma or conditions such as new-onset Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Actrapid: Eight Steps For Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Actrapid: Eight Steps For Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life threatening condition that occurs when excessive amounts of ketones are released into the bloodstream as a result of the body breaking down lipids, instead of utilising glucose as the energy source. This process is known as gluconeogenesis and occurs when the body does not have sufficient insulin to allow the uptake of glucose from the bloodstream into the cells. It is observed primarily in people with type one diabetes (insulin dependent), but it can occur in type two diabetes (non-insulin dependent) under certain circumstances. To understand the symptoms of DKA and therefore how to manage it effectively, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of hyperglycaemia which is explained in the flowchart below: The further down this flowchart the patient gets, the more serious their symptoms become. For this reason, there are varying degrees of severity with DKA: Mild pH 7.25 – 7.30, bicarbonate decreased to 15–18 mmol/L, the person is alert Moderate pH 7.00 – 7.25, bicarbonate 10–15 mmol/L, drowsiness may be present Severe pH below 7.00, bicarbonate below 10 mmol/L, stupor or coma may occur A.C.T.R.A.P.I.D. To remember the principles involved in managing a patient with DKA, remember the acronym ACTRAPID. Airway, breathing, circulation Commence fluid resuscitation Treat potassium Replace insulin Acidosis management Prevent complications Information for patients Discharge Airway, Breathing, Circulation As Per Any Emergency DKA patients need to have their airway, breathing and circulation assessed immediately. A decreased level of consciousness may lead to an unprotected airway and compromised breathing. The osmotic diuresis can cause a significant loss of fluid, leading to severe dehydration and circulatory co Continue reading >>

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