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Metabolic Acidosis - Dka (exam 4)

Metabolic Acidosis - Dka (exam 4)

Transcript of Metabolic Acidosis - DKA (Exam 4) ATI Metabolic Acidosis ATI Client Education - ATI The following are the five classic types of ABG results demonstrating balance and imbalance. ATI Metabolic Acidosis Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures • To determine the type of imbalance, follow these steps: Metabolic Acidosis - DKA Patient-Centered Care • For all acid-base imbalances, it is imperative to treat the underlying cause. Exam 4 Results from - ›› Excess production of hydrogen ions »»Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) »»Lactic acidosis »»Starvation »»Heavy exercise »»Seizure activity »»Fever »»Hypoxia »»Intoxication with ethanol or salicylates ›› Inadequate elimination of hydrogen ions »»Kidney failure ›› Inadequate production of bicarbonate »»Kidney failure »»Pancreatitis »»Liver failure »»Dehydration ›› Excess elimination of bicarbonate »»Diarrhea, ileostomy ›› Vital signs: bradycardia, weak peripheral pulses, hypotension, tachypnea ›› Dysrhythmias ›› Neurological: muscle weakness, hyporeflexia, flaccid paralysis, fatigue, confusion ›› Respiratory: rapid, deep respirations (Kussmaul respirations) ›› Skin: warm, dry, flushed • Step 1: Look at pH. - If less than 7.35, diagnose as acidosis . • Step 2: Look at PaCO2 and HCO3 - simultaneously. Determine which is in the expected reference range. Conclude that the other is the indicator of imbalance. Diagnose less than 22 or greater than 26 HCO3 - as metabolic in origin. Step 3: Combine diagnoses of Steps 1 and 2 to name the type of imbalance. - If greater than 7.45, diagnose as alkalosis. Diagnose less than 35 or greater than 45 PaCO2 as respiratory in origin. Step 4: Evaluate the PaO2 and the SaO2. • If the results are below the expected refe Continue reading >>

Advance Adult Med Surge - Ati Targeted - Endocrine

Advance Adult Med Surge - Ati Targeted - Endocrine

1. Rapid deep respirations- would be a finding of hyperglycemia 2. Cool clammy skin- Hypoglycemia causes cool clammy skin in addition to anxiety, nervousness, tachycardia, and confusion. 3. Abdominal cramping- would be a finding of hyperglycemia 4. Orthostatic hypotension- this would be caused by hyperglycemia because of the dehydration= hypotension You are teaching about glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c testing. Which statement indicates understanding? 1. I need to fats after midnight the night before the test 2. This test is good indicator of my average blood glucose control 3. A level of 8% to 10% suggests adequate blood glucose control. 4. I will use my hemoglobin A1c level to adjust my daily insulin doses 1. I need to fats after midnight the night before the test- Does not need to fast, what the Pt eats the day before has no effect on the test. 2. This test is good indicator of my average blood glucose control- it reflects the PTs glucose levels over a 120 day period which is also the life span of the RBC 3. A level of 8% to 10% suggests adequate blood glucose control.- should be lower than 7% 4. I will use my hemoglobin A1c level to adjust my daily insulin doses - Should use capillary glucose levels to adjust daily insulin doses You are planning preoperative care for PT who has pheochromocytoma. which intervention should you anticipate as being priority? 1. Use same arm for BP measurement- not 1st 2. Avoid palpating the abdomen- greatest risk is HTN crisis by palpating the abdomen can cause a sudden release of catecholamines=HTN crisis. 3. manage headaches with analgesics- not 1st 4. Provide a private darkened room- not 1st Rn is assessing a PT who has a new dx of cushings disease. Which finding would the RN expect? 3. Hirsutism- expected due to increased androgen p Continue reading >>

Fluid And Electrolyte/acid-base Flashcards

Fluid And Electrolyte/acid-base Flashcards

1. 50 year old with pneumonia, diaphoresis and a high fever Rationale: Diaphoresis and high fever can lead to free water loss through the skin, resulting in hypernatremia. Loop diuretics are more likely to result in a hypovolemic hyponatremia. Diarrhea and vomitting cause both sodium and water losses. Clients with SIADH have hyponatremia due to increased water reabsorption in the renal tubules. A client is admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis and, with treatment, has a normal blood glucose, pH, and serum osmolality. During assessment, the client complains of weakness in the legs. Which of the following is a priority nursing intervention? 1. Request a physical therapy consult from the physician. 2. Ensure the client is safe from falls and check the most recent potassium level. 3. Allow uninterrupted rest periods throughout the day. 4. Encourage the client to increase intake of dairy products and green leafy vegetables. 2. Ensure the client is safe from falls and check the most recent potassium level. Rationale: In the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis the blood sugar is lowered, the pH is corrected, and potassium moves back into the cells, resulting in low serum potassium. Client safety and the correction of low potassium levels are a priority. The weakness in the legs is a clinical manifestation of the hypokalemia. Dairy products and green, leafy vegetables are a source of calcium. A client with a potassium level of 5.5 mEq/L is to receive sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate) orally. After administering the drug the priority nursing action is to monitor Normal serum potassium levels are 3.5 to 5.5 mEq/L. The nurse is caring for a bedridden client admitted with multiple myeloma and a serum calcium level of 13 mg/dL. Which of the following is the most appropriate nu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Nclex Questions

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Nclex Questions

This quiz on DKA (Diabetic Ketoacidosis NCLEX Questions) will test you on how to care for the diabetic patient who is experiencing this condition. As the nurse, you must know typical signs and symptoms of DKA, patient teaching, and expected medical treatments. 1 Relapsed Multiple Myeloma - Get The Facts Learn More About Relapsed Multiple Myeloma at the Official Physician Site. Prescription treatment website 2 Login to Your Account Sign In To Your Email! emailloginnow.com Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS) are both complication of diabetes mellitus, but there are differences between the two complications that you must know as a nurse. This endocrine teaching series will test your knowledge on how to differentiate between the two conditions, along with a video lecture. This DKA quiz will test you on the following for the NCLEX exam: Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Patient education for DKA Treatments of Diabetic Ketoacidosis NCLEX Review Nursing Lecture on DKA (NOTE: When you hit submit, it will refresh this same page. Scroll down to see your results.) 1. Which of the following is not a sign or symptom of Diabetic Ketoacidosis? A. Positive Ketones in the urine B. Oliguria C. Polydipsia D. Abdominal Pain 2. A patient is admitted with Diabetic Ketoacidosis. The physician orders intravenous fluids of 0.9% Normal Saline and 10 units of intravenous regular insulin IV bolus and then to start an insulin drip per protocol. The patient’s labs are the following: pH 7.25, Glucose 455, potassium 2.5. Which of the following is the most appropriate nursing intervention to perform next? A. Start the IV fluids and administer the insulin bolus and drip as ordered B. Hold the insulin and notify the d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosisworkup

Diabetic Ketoacidosisworkup

Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Diabetic ketoacidosis is typically characterized by hyperglycemia over 250 mg/dL, a bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq/L, and a pH less than 7.30, with ketonemia and ketonuria. While definitions vary, mild DKA can be categorized by a pH level of 7.25-7.3 and a serum bicarbonate level between 15-18 mEq/L; moderate DKA can be categorized by a pH between 7.0-7.24 and a serum bicarbonate level of 10 to less than 15 mEq/L; and severe DKA has a pH less than 7.0 and bicarbonate less than 10 mEq/L. [ 17 ] In mild DKA, anion gap is greater than 10 and in moderate or severe DKA the anion gap is greater than 12. These figures differentiate DKA from HHS where blood glucose is greater than 600 mg/dL but pH is greater than 7.3 and serum bicarbonate greater than 15 mEq/L. Laboratory studies for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) should be scheduled as follows: Blood tests for glucose every 1-2 h until patient is stable, then every 4-6 h Serum electrolyte determinations every 1-2 h until patient is stable, then every 4-6 h Glaser NS, Marcin JP, Wootton-Gorges SL, et al. Correlation of clinical and biochemical findings with diabetic ketoacidosis-related cerebral edema in children using magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging. J Pediatr. 2008 Jun 25. [Medline] . Umpierrez GE, Jones S, Smiley D, et al. Insulin analogs versus human insulin in the treatment of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis: a randomized controlled trial. Diabetes Care. 2009 Jul. 32(7):1164-9. [Medline] . [Full Text] . Herrington WG, Nye HJ, Hammersley MS, Watkinson PJ. Are arterial and venous samples clinically equivalent for the estimation of pH, serum bicarbonate and potassium concentration in critically ill patients?. Diabet Med. 201 Continue reading >>

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) is a complication of diabetes mellitus in which high blood sugar results in high osmolarity without significant ketoacidosis.[4] Symptoms include signs of dehydration, weakness, legs cramps, trouble seeing, and an altered level of consciousness.[2] Onset is typically over days to weeks.[3] Complications may include seizures, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, mesenteric artery occlusion, or rhabdomyolysis.[2] The main risk factor is a history of diabetes mellitus type 2.[4] Occasionally it may occur in those without a prior history of diabetes or those with diabetes mellitus type 1.[3][4] Triggers include infections, stroke, trauma, certain medications, and heart attacks.[4] Diagnosis is based on blood tests finding a blood sugar greater than 30 mmol/L (600 mg/dL), osmolarity greater than 320 mOsm/kg, and a pH above 7.3.[2][3] Initial treatment generally consists of intravenous fluids to manage dehydration, intravenous insulin in those with significant ketones, low molecular weight heparin to decrease the risk of blood clotting, and antibiotics among those in whom there is concerns of infection.[3] The goal is a slow decline in blood sugar levels.[3] Potassium replacement is often required as the metabolic problems are corrected.[3] Efforts to prevent diabetic foot ulcers are also important.[3] It typically takes a few days for the person to return to baseline.[3] While the exact frequency of the condition is unknown, it is relatively common.[2][4] Older people are most commonly affected.[4] The risk of death among those affected is about 15%.[4] It was first described in the 1880s.[4] Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms of high blood sugar including increased thirst (polydipsia), increased volume of urination (polyurea), and i Continue reading >>

Free Unfinished Flashcards About Ati Fundamentals

Free Unfinished Flashcards About Ati Fundamentals

Name the health care regulatory agencies. Joint Commission, State boards of Nursing, & FDA American Nurses Association (ANA) & National League of Nursing (NLN) are professional ____ organizations? ___ health care involves the provision of specialized and highly technical care? ICU, Oncology treatment center, Burn center Cardiac rehabilitation and home health care are both examples of ___ care? An older adult who states "it is difficult to prepare nutritional balanced meals at home for just myself", should be referred to which member of the health care team? Who can assist clients who have physical challenges to use adaptive devices or methods to help the patient to actively participate in self-care activities? A registered dietician can help a patient choose nutritional needs, but they cannot help the patient with _____ _____? True or False: CNA's are able to assist the patient in understanding medication side effects and determine pain level. True or False: CNA's can assist patients with ADL's such as bathing, toileting and ambulation, as well as measuring and recording information such as vital signs and intake and output. What is the right to make own decisions? Ex. patient refuses surgery What is characterized by taking action to help others?Ex. nurse offers pain med to client before ambulating What is characterized by fairness in care delivery and use of resources?Ex. nurse explains all clients waiting for kidney transplant must meet the same criteria What is the act of avoiding harm or injury?Ex. nurse questions med prescription she believes is too dangerous for an older adult client Which tort can make a patient fearful and apprehensive?Ex. AP tells patient, "If you don't stop peeing everywhere, I am going to put a diaper on you." The patient can only choose any Continue reading >>

Diabetes- Ati Testing

Diabetes- Ati Testing

Sort What are the risk factors for DM? Genetics may predispose an individual to the occurrence of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Toxins and viruses can predispose an individual to diabetes by destroying the beta cells leading to type 1 diabetes mellitus. Obesity, physical inactivity, high triglycerides (greater than 250 mg/dL), and hypertension may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Secondary causes of diabetes include pancreatitis and Cushing's syndrome. What are the nutritional guidelines for patient's with DM to follow when sick? ■■ Monitor blood glucose every 3 to 4 hr. ■■ Continue to take insulin or oral antidiabetic agents. ■■ Consume 4 oz of sugar-free, non-caffeinated liquid every 0.5 hr to prevent dehydration. ■■Test urine for ketones and report to provider if they are abnormal (the level should be negative to small). Call the health care provider if: ■■ Blood glucose is greater than 240 mg/dL. ■■Fever is greater than 38.9° C (102° F), does not respond to acetaminophen, or lasts more than 12 hr. What patient education should be provided for S & S of hypoglycemia? ☐☐ Treat with 15 to 20 g carbohydrates Examples - 4 oz orange juice, 2 oz grape juice, 8 oz milk, glucose tablets per manufacturer's suggestion to equal 15 g ☐☐ Recheck blood glucose in 15 min. ☐☐ If still low (less than 70 mg/dL), give 15 to 20 g more of carbohydrates. ☐☐ Recheck blood glucose in 15 min. ☐☐ If blood glucose is within normal limits, take 7 g protein (if the next meal ismore than an hour away). Example - 1 oz of cheese (1 string cheese), 2 tablespoons of peanutbutter, or 8 oz of milk Oral hypoglycemics ■■ Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors - Acarbose (Precose) and miglitol (Glyset) ☐☐ Slows carbohydrate absorpti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Practice Quiz #1 (40 Questions)

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Practice Quiz #1 (40 Questions)

This exam is all about Diabetes Mellitus! The purpose of this exam is to provide nurses and future nurses an overview of the disease, including its management, impact, and complications. Accomplish this 40-item NCLEX style examination and guarantee a good performance on your NCLEX. Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending. ~ Carl Bard Topics Included topics in this practice quiz are: Guidelines Follow the guidelines below to make the most out of this exam: Read each question carefully and choose the best answer. You are given one minute per question. Spend your time wisely! Answers and rationales are given below. Be sure to read them. If you need more clarifications, please direct them to the comments section. Questions See Also You may also like these quizzes: 3,500+ NCLEX-RN Practice Questions for Free – Tons of practice questions for various topics in the NCLEX-RN! Study Guides Cardiovascular System Respiratory System Nervous System Digestive and Gastrointestinal System Endocrine System Urinary System Homeostasis: Fluids and Electrolytes Cancer and Oncology Nursing Burns and Burn Injury Management Emergency Nursing Miscellaneous Recommended Books and Resources Selected NCLEX-RN review books: MUST HAVE: Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination, 7th Edition – A must have book if you're taking the NCLEX-RN. You need to have this. Saunders Strategies for Success for the NCLEX – An invaluable guide that will help you master what matters most in passing nursing school and the NCLEX. Mosby's Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN – This book has helped nurses pass the NCLEX exam for over 60 years. Practice with over 600 alternative item question formats. Prioritization, Dele Continue reading >>

Ati Med-surg: Chp 84: Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Ati Med-surg: Chp 84: Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Always treat the underlying cause (infectious process). Provide rapid isotonic fluid (0.9% sodium chloride) replacement to maintain perfusion to vital organs. Monitor the client for evidence of fluid volume excess (urine output, kidney function, pulmonary status, jugular venous distention, and body weight) due to the need for large quantities of fluid. Physiological changes in cardiac and pulmonary function may place older adult clients at greater risk for fluid overload (precipitate heart failure exacerbation) from fluid replacement therapy. Follow with a hypotonic fluid (0.45% sodium chloride) to continue replacing losses to total body fluid. When serum glucose levels approach 250 mg/dL, add glucose to IV fluids to minimize the risk of cerebral edema associated with drastic changes in serum osmolarity and prevent hypoglycemia. Administer regular insulin (Humulin R) 0.1 unit/kg as an IV bolus dose and then follow with a continuous IV infusion of regular insulin at 0.1 unit/kg/hr. IV regular insulin is administered because of the 4-min half-life of the insulin infusion, avoiding delay in onset. Monitor blood glucose hourly. Blood glucose of less than 200 mg/dL is the goal for resolution. Monitor serum potassium levels. Potassium levels will initially be increased with insulin therapy, but potassium will shift into cells and the client will need to be monitored for hypokalemia. Provide potassium replacement therapy in all replacement IV fluids, as indicated by laboratory values. Make sure urinary output is adequate before administering potassium. Administer sodium bicarbonate by slow IV infusion for severe acidosis (pH of less than 7.0). Monitor potassium levels because a correcting acidosis too quickly may lead to hypokalemia. Teach older adult clients to monitor blood Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Nursing Nclex® Lab Values Study Guide

Nursing Nclex® Lab Values Study Guide

Want a PDF Version To Take With You Anywhere? Feel free to print it off, stick it in your clinical binder, or just keep it on your phone / tablet for quick access whenever you need it! It’s our free gift to you! Grab the 63 Must Know Lab Values Share on Facebook Save to Pinterest Click on any value below to learn more: Labs Values by Disease Process Please keep in mind that all of the following lab values are for the adult patient, unless otherwise stated. We also do our very best to provide you with consistent normal ranges, however please keep in mind that these may vary depending upon your reference source. Your nursing school textbooks may reflect slightly different values. When in doubt, go with what your nursing school professors have provided, as that will be what you are tested upon. What labs do you draw for dehydration: The specific labs will depend on the severity of the patient’s symptoms and additional concurrent problems, but generally speaking, the following will be drawn: BMP – reveals any electrolyte imbalances (K, Na, Cl, bicarb) requiring replacement, as well as kidney function (BUN and creatinine) They may order a CMP, which has additional labs on it, as well as a magnesium and phosphorus levels, which are not included on a BMP/CMP UA – lets you know the concentration of the urine, if infection is present CBC – must check the H/H, hematocrit is typically elevated Fingerstick glucose – must get a baseline glucose, especially if the patient has a history of diabetes Urine and/or blood osmolality – further evaluates fluid balance While there are literally THOUSANDS of lab values that you can learn, it would be impossible to do so . . . As you begin working as a nurse on a specialized unit you will have to learn different labs that are impo Continue reading >>

Ati: Chapter 84 Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Ati: Chapter 84 Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Sort What are clinical manifestations of DKA polyuria polydipsia polyphagia weightloss GI effects blurred vision, headach eweakness orthostatic hypotension fruity odor of breath Kussmaul respirations metabolic acidosis mental status changes A nurse is reviewing th ehealth record fo a client who has hyperglycemic-hyperosmolar state (HHS) which of the following data confirms this diagnosis? (select all that apply) A. Evidence of recent MI B> BUn 35 mg/dL C. Takes a calcium channel blocker D. Age 77 E. No insulin production A. Evidence of recent MI B Bun 35 mg/dL C. takes calcium channel blocker D. Age 77 A nurse is assessing client who has DKA and ketones in the urine. Which of the following are expected findings (select all that apply) A. Weight gain B. fruity odor of breath C. abdominal pain D. Kussmaul respirations E. Meatabolic acidosis B. fruity odor of breath C. abdominal pain D. Kussmaul respirations E. meatabolic acidosis A nurse is preparing to administer IV fluids to a client who has DKA. Which of the following` is an appropriate nursing action? A. administer an IV infusion of regular insulin at 0.3units/kg/hr B. Administer an IV infusion of 0.45% sodium chloride C. Rapidly administer an IV infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride D. Add glucose to the IV when serum glucose is at 350mg/dL C. Rapidly administer an IV infusion of 0.9% sodium choloride A nurse is providing discharge teaching to a client who experienced diabetic ketoacidosis. Which of the following should the nurse include in the teaching? (select all that apply) A. Drink 3 L of fluid daily B. monitor blood glucose every 4 hours when ill C> Admin insulin as prescribed when ill. D. Notify the provider when blood glucose is 200mg/dL E. Report ketones in the urine after 24 hours of illness A. drink 3 L of flui Continue reading >>

Dka Vs Hhs (hhns) Nclex Review

Dka Vs Hhs (hhns) Nclex Review

Diabetic ketoacidosis vs hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS or HHS): What are the differences between these two complications of diabetes mellitus? This NCLEX review will simplify the differences between DKA and HHNS and give you a video lecture that easily explains their differences. Many students get these two complications confused due to their similarities, but there are major differences between these two complications. After reviewing this NCLEX review, don’t forget to take the quiz on DKA vs HHNS. Lecture on DKA and HHS DKA vs HHNS Diabetic Ketoacidosis Affects mainly Type 1 diabetics Ketones and Acidosis present Hyperglycemia presents >300 mg/dL Variable osmolality Happens Suddenly Causes: no insulin present in the body or illness/infection Seen in young or undiagnosed diabetics Main problems are hyperglycemia, ketones, and acidosis (blood pH <7.35) Clinical signs/symptoms: Kussmaul breathing, fruity breath, abdominal pain Treatment is the same as in HHNS (fluids, electrolyte replacement, and insulin) Watch potassium levels closely when giving insulin and make sure the level is at least 3.3 before administrating. Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Syndrome Affects mainly Type 2 diabetics No ketones or acidosis present EXTREME Hyperglycemia (remember heavy-duty hyperglycemia) >600 mg/dL sometimes four digits High Osmolality (more of an issue in HHNS than DKA) Happens Gradually Causes: mainly illness or infection and there is some insulin present which prevents the breakdown of ketones Seen in older adults due to illness or infection Main problems are dehydration & heavy-duty hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity (because the glucose is so high it makes the blood very concentrated) More likely to have mental status changes due to severe dehydrat Continue reading >>

Nclex-rn Prep--hypernatremia Vs Hyponatremia | Ati Nursing | Pinterest | Nclex Rn, Nclex And Hyponatremia

Nclex-rn Prep--hypernatremia Vs Hyponatremia | Ati Nursing | Pinterest | Nclex Rn, Nclex And Hyponatremia

First r/penmanshipporn post - nursing school notes, any tips? Post with 23428 views. First r/penmanshipporn post - nursing school notes, any tips? except that in vet med we don't really have SIADH to fall back on. 7 Steps to a Healthier Heart in 2017 Congenital Heart Defects Electrolytes 101 + Homemade Sports Drinks Electrolytes ~~ wow I wish I knew this a long time ago. magnesium & potassium (I know I saw some other drawings by this person that looked useful Med student flash cards - pretty darn close to what us nurses/nursing students study. Concept map that explains diabetic ketoacidosis causes, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. This map links between all aspects of DKA to simplify understanding and memorization. ATI TEAS 6 Test Breakdown-The ATI TEAS 6 Test is a standard exam that is required for preadmission for those who are wishing to attend nursing school. 47 Medical-Surgical Nursing Flashcards & Memory Aids NCLEX online nursing education for all nurses, all nursing students and healthcare professionals. QD Nurses is the one-stop source for every day nursing! Tips on Studying for the ATI Nursing Test Tips on Studying for the ATI Nursing Test | eHow Common Laboratory Tests & Normative Values Continue reading >>

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