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Dka Lab Values Ati

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Pass the ATI! This video series is intended to help nursing student study for the ATI comprehensive and Maternal Newborn (OB) exam. It focuses on the key concepts from the ATI Maternal Newborn Nursing book, with some tips and tricks for remembering the information. In this video: Ch 9: Iron-deficient anemia, Gestational Diabetes, Gestational Hypertension. Please offer comments or suggestions on how these videos can be improved! Also, please feel free to share these videos with your classmates :) Subscribe ➜ https://www.youtube.com/cathyparkes?s... AND be sure to click the “bell” to be notified when new videos are posted. Sign up for email updates (more study resources coming soon!) ➜ https://www.LevelUpRN.com Check out all our study resources ➜ https://www.LevelUpRN.com Also, please share a link with your classmates and friends in nursing school if you think it would help them too!

Free Unfinished Flashcards About Ati Fundamentals

Name the health care regulatory agencies. Joint Commission, State boards of Nursing, & FDA American Nurses Association (ANA) & National League of Nursing (NLN) are professional ____ organizations? ___ health care involves the provision of specialized and highly technical care? ICU, Oncology treatment center, Burn center Cardiac rehabilitation and home health care are both examples of ___ care? An older adult who states "it is difficult to prepare nutritional balanced meals at home for just myself", should be referred to which member of the health care team? Who can assist clients who have physical challenges to use adaptive devices or methods to help the patient to actively participate in self-care activities? A registered dietician can help a patient choose nutritional needs, but they cannot help the patient with _____ _____? True or False: CNA's are able to assist the patient in understanding medication side effects and determine pain level. True or False: CNA's can assist patients with ADL's such as bathing, toileting and ambulation, as well as measuring and recording information such as vital signs and intake and output. What is the right to make own decisions? Ex. patient ref Continue reading >>

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  1. Pegsy

    Metformin and Diarrhea

    My dosage of Metformin has been increased from 1000 mg per day to 2000 mg per day. The higher dosage is doing a fantastic job of controlling my glucose. The increase was done gradually over a period of 2 weeks without incident. Then, after being on the full dose for 10 days I experienced explosive diarrhea while at work. It didn't last long and I did not discontinue or reduce the medication. All has been well for exactly one week and then last night I was awakened by cramping and diarrhea.
    I do not want to eliminate or reduce this medication if I can help it. My doctor says that occassional diarrhea is just part of living with this medication. Is it? Reading on this site I have noticed others have said they experienced diarrhea with Metformin when they ate the wrong things. What are the wrong things? On the first occasion I had Chinese food for dinner at a restaurant the night before. My husband also had stomach upset. I know I consumed more carbs than I should have. Last night, I had "tater tots" with my dinner but did not exceed my allowed amount for carbs. From now on, if I eat potatoes at all, they will be "real" ones, not the frozen prepared variety. As it is, I rarely consume potatoes at all.
    Has anyone here had this experience and found a solution? As I said, this medication is very effective for me and one of the safest available. I do not want to stop it if i can find a solution. Your input from personal experience would be greatly appreciated.

  2. Copperchef

    I did have a similar problem, my physician changed me to Metformin ER which is a slow release drug and the problem went away. The ER is gentler on the system.

  3. Pegsy

    I'm on ER too. It seems to be doing better. Not completely resolved but getting there.

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What is HYPERNATREMIA? What does HYPERNATREMIA mean? HYPERNATREMIA meaning - HYPERNATREMIA pronunciation - HYPERNATREMIA definition - HYPERNATREMIA explanation - How to pronounce HYPERNATREMIA? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Hypernatremia is a high sodium ion level in the blood. Early symptoms may include a strong feeling of thirst, weakness, nausea, and loss of appetite. Severe symptoms include confusion, muscle twitching, and bleeding in or around the brain. Normal serum sodium levels are 135 - 145 mmol/L (135 - 145 mEq/L). Hypernatremia is generally defined as a serum sodium level of more than 145 mmol/L. Severe symptoms typically only occur when levels are above 160 mmol/L. Hypernatremia is typically classified by a person's fluid status into low volume, normal volume, and high volume. Low volume hypernatremia can occur from sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, diuretic medication, or kidney disease. Normal volume hypernatremia can be due to fever, inappropriately decreased thirst, prolonged increased breath rate, diabetes insipidus, and from lithium among other causes. High volume hypernatremia can be due to hyperaldoste

Nclex-rn Prep--hypernatremia Vs Hyponatremia | Ati Nursing | Pinterest | Nclex Rn, Nclex And Hyponatremia

First r/penmanshipporn post - nursing school notes, any tips? Post with 23428 views. First r/penmanshipporn post - nursing school notes, any tips? except that in vet med we don't really have SIADH to fall back on. 7 Steps to a Healthier Heart in 2017 Congenital Heart Defects Electrolytes 101 + Homemade Sports Drinks Electrolytes ~~ wow I wish I knew this a long time ago. magnesium & potassium (I know I saw some other drawings by this person that looked useful Med student flash cards - pretty darn close to what us nurses/nursing students study. Concept map that explains diabetic ketoacidosis causes, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. This map links between all aspects of DKA to simplify understanding and memorization. ATI TEAS 6 Test Breakdown-The ATI TEAS 6 Test is a standard exam that is required for preadmission for those who are wishing to attend nursing school. 47 Medical-Surgical Nursing Flashcards & Memory Aids NCLEX online nursing education for all nurses, all nursing students and healthcare professionals. QD Nurses is the one-stop source for every day nursing! Tips on Studying for the ATI Nursing Test Tips on Studying for the ATI Nursing Test | eHow Common Laborato Continue reading >>

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  1. Kristin251

    recently I've had a taste for some white wine. I realize there's carbs in it so I bolus for those. I keep bloods good through the night until I start my rise around 4 am. Since the wine ( I THINK) my fastings have been MUCH higher. Could it be the wine is giving me way too many carbs than I'm used to? Kicking me out of ketosis? But why should it effect me that many hours later?
    Maybe the same as when I over eat protein and have higher fastings.
    Ideas? Thought?

  2. helensaramay

    I know these things affect different people in different ways. But alcohol usually causes my BG To drop during the night.
    Is it possible that you have gone hypo in the night and not woken so your body has taken over and released too much glycogen which has caused your fasting BG to be higher?

  3. Kristin251

    helensaramay said: ↑
    I know these things affect different people in different ways. But alcohol usually causes my BG To drop during the night.
    Is it possible that you have gone hypo in the night and not woken so your body has taken over and released too much glycogen which has caused your fasting BG to be higher? Alcohol like vodka cause a drop for sure. Wine has the carbs.
    I have been testing recently and I was dropping into the 50-60 range but a spoonful of avocado before bed stopped that. Now I'm just getting the huge spike after 4:30. Some nights I have an ounce of chilled vodka before bed to help me sleep. Haven't done that th least fee nights. That could fit into the equation too!!

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This video focuses on the ADVANCE and ADVANCE-ON clinical trials. These studies compared lowering blood pressure to tighter glycemic control in Type II Diabetic patients. The ADVANCE trial was originally published in The New England Journal of Medicine on June 12, 2008. The ADVANCE-ON trial, which is a 6 year follow up study was published in The New England Journal of Medicine on Oct 9, 2014. You can find out more about us at: www.brothersmd.com Here's a link to the ADVANCE- ON investigation: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/... Here's the link to the ADVANCE investigation: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/... Disclaimer: We are not affiliated with any societies, journals or studies, we intend to discuss the key points. We do not ensure the accuracy of any of the information discussed and cannot be held liable in the event of any damages due to the mentioned information.

Advance Adult Med Surge - Ati Targeted - Endocrine

1. Rapid deep respirations- would be a finding of hyperglycemia 2. Cool clammy skin- Hypoglycemia causes cool clammy skin in addition to anxiety, nervousness, tachycardia, and confusion. 3. Abdominal cramping- would be a finding of hyperglycemia 4. Orthostatic hypotension- this would be caused by hyperglycemia because of the dehydration= hypotension You are teaching about glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c testing. Which statement indicates understanding? 1. I need to fats after midnight the night before the test 2. This test is good indicator of my average blood glucose control 3. A level of 8% to 10% suggests adequate blood glucose control. 4. I will use my hemoglobin A1c level to adjust my daily insulin doses 1. I need to fats after midnight the night before the test- Does not need to fast, what the Pt eats the day before has no effect on the test. 2. This test is good indicator of my average blood glucose control- it reflects the PTs glucose levels over a 120 day period which is also the life span of the RBC 3. A level of 8% to 10% suggests adequate blood glucose control.- should be lower than 7% 4. I will use my hemoglobin A1c level to adjust my daily insulin doses - Should use ca Continue reading >>

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  1. tk421

    Sorry if this doesn't belong in this part of the forum, but it seems better here than the other places in the forum.
    I am having trouble finding a solid answer to this. Everywhere I look online tells me something different. I see some say around 50 mg/dl which I would think is totally hypoglycemic. So I don’t really believe that. I see others saying as long as you are below about 97 mg/dl. I see others that say in the 80s. Some say other things. I just want a straight answer. So I need some advice from a successful keto person.
    What is proper blood glucose levels for someone who is in ketosis? I got this blood glucose monitor and I think it may be defective or just a crappy brand. Yesterday my fasting blood glucose (after a 14 hour fast) was 83 mg/dl. Today (again after a 14 hour fast) was 97. I couldn’t believe it so I took my blood glucose again and it said 92. Then I ate exactly 3 pieces of bacon and a piece of cheese, and two hours later my blood glucose was 102. I thought WTF, so I immediately took it again and it said 109.
    So maybe I have a defective monitor (the Nova Max Plus), but regardless, there is probably at least a little bit of truth to it. But I seriously eat 25 grams or less of carbs per day. Usually less.
    Could someone please explain glucose levels to me in regards to ketosis.

  2. JBean

    In the absence of dietary carbohydrates, your body will break down fats and proteins to maintain your blood glucose in the normal range. Here's an explanation:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluconeogenesis

  3. tk421

    Originally posted by JBean
    In the absence of dietary carbohydrates, your body will break down fats and proteins to maintain your blood glucose in the normal range. Here's an explanation:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluconeogenesis Very interesting. Thanks for the info, that helps me a lot!!
    Cheers

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