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Dka Lab Values Ati

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Pass the ATI! This video series is intended to help nursing student study for the ATI comprehensive and Maternal Newborn (OB) exam. It focuses on the key concepts from the ATI Maternal Newborn Nursing book, with some tips and tricks for remembering the information. In this video: Ch 9: Iron-deficient anemia, Gestational Diabetes, Gestational Hypertension. Please offer comments or suggestions on how these videos can be improved! Also, please feel free to share these videos with your classmates :) Subscribe ➜ https://www.youtube.com/cathyparkes?s... AND be sure to click the “bell” to be notified when new videos are posted. Sign up for email updates (more study resources coming soon!) ➜ https://www.LevelUpRN.com Check out all our study resources ➜ https://www.LevelUpRN.com Also, please share a link with your classmates and friends in nursing school if you think it would help them too!

Advance Adult Med Surge - Ati Targeted - Endocrine

1. Rapid deep respirations- would be a finding of hyperglycemia 2. Cool clammy skin- Hypoglycemia causes cool clammy skin in addition to anxiety, nervousness, tachycardia, and confusion. 3. Abdominal cramping- would be a finding of hyperglycemia 4. Orthostatic hypotension- this would be caused by hyperglycemia because of the dehydration= hypotension You are teaching about glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c testing. Which statement indicates understanding? 1. I need to fats after midnight the night before the test 2. This test is good indicator of my average blood glucose control 3. A level of 8% to 10% suggests adequate blood glucose control. 4. I will use my hemoglobin A1c level to adjust my daily insulin doses 1. I need to fats after midnight the night before the test- Does not need to fast, what the Pt eats the day before has no effect on the test. 2. This test is good indicator of my average blood glucose control- it reflects the PTs glucose levels over a 120 day period which is also the life span of the RBC 3. A level of 8% to 10% suggests adequate blood glucose control.- should be lower than 7% 4. I will use my hemoglobin A1c level to adjust my daily insulin doses - Should use ca Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Phoenix/Rising

    How do I gain maximum muscle on keto?

    I know that keto is usually considered a fat loss diet, but the fact is that I just plain feel better following a keto diet. Seems like carbs (even low GI ones) really upset my digestive system. Not to be overly graphic, but honestly, it just gives me gas and the runs haha!
    So I've decided that I want to add muscle mass and strength, but I want to stay on a (mostly) ketogenic diet because I just feel better with it. I've heard about three approaches to this:
    - Targeted Ketogenic Diet
    - Cyclical Ketongenic Diet
    - Timed Carbohydrate Diet
    I've heard "TCD" is kind of like "TKD" on "steroids" (some other thread I can't find now) but I have no idea how to work with it. I do understand that in general I need to have carbohydrates before my lifting workout and after, but I'm not sure how to calculate how many, especially given the fact that I'll need an *excess* of calories to spur muscle growth. Not only that, but with that much protein (aiming at about ~250g/day), I'm concerned I'll be knocked out of ketosis.
    So, a few questions:
    - TKD vs. CKD - which leads to better muscle gains?
    - Is TCD realistic, how do you execute it properly (links that I may have missed appreciated) and will I gain as much or more than TKD or CKD on it?
    - Can a properly executed ketogenic mass building diet put on as much muscle as a "standard" bodybuilding diet?
    Now, one more twist.
    I also practice Krav Maga (martial art) twice a week. It's a very intense workout that gets my heart rate way up there for about an hour. Using a heart rate monitor, I once found that my average calorie burn in one of these classes is about 800-1200 calories (no I'm not kidding). My concern is that any gains I'll be making while lifting would be negated by too aerobically an intense workout. Should I just "carb up" prior to these classes (perhaps with some fruit?) and a little after to prevent muscle loss?
    Final question: since my gut doesn't get along so well with bread, pasta, potatoes, etc., (and I hate sweet potatoes, they make me gag, sorry!), is there a good supplement you can recommend instead?
    Thanks in advance

  2. Ozeren44

    I had to look up the "Timed Carb Dieting", but I believe I get the idea.
    You basically stay really low in carbs just like a SKD would under 25g a day with one exception. After a workout, you pound in that 60-100g of carbs to refuel your supply of glycogen. Theoretically, with that high of a spike in carbs, insulin will spike and will funnel all those carbs to the muscles. After the carbs, take your protein right after just like a normal PWO shake. Again, with insulin spiked, all that protein will be funneled to the muscles to repair and aid in recovery.
    There is very little difference between the TKD and TCD. The only difference is that TKD approach actually puts around 30-50g carbs about 30 minutes before the workout. This is because when you are on a keto diet your muscle glycogen is naturally lower than say a normal diet at its base rate. Normal diet is around 100-110 mmol. Ketogenic diets keep you at around 70 mmol. TKD basically gives you just enough glycogen to workout and then consume a protein shake after for recovery.
    Either way may work, but it will take some testing to see how your body reacts. Test it and tell us how it goes on either. Take not of how to feel prior to the workout and how you feel about 1 hour after the workout.
    You can try for more liquid carbs for upset stomach problems. Many have reported that it does not upset their stomach nearly as much. Use primarily dextrose or some other really fast carb. For those really intense workouts I would definitely ingest a little carb as it is an extended high intensity workout.
    Only thing you can do is test it out to see how your body reacts to it.

  3. andymant

    Hi Pheonix
    My advise is as follows:
    Both CKD and TKD will result in muscle gains if executed correctly. If your weekly calories and the same on either of these diets then you will have the same gains. However, it has been mooted on these forums that CKD can result in more weight being put on and by that i need more fat as well as muscle. I believe it is because its harder to monitor that TKD so easier to go overboard on a carb up period. On Reddit there is a guy called Darthluigi who has been bulking on TKD for several years and he is huge and around 6% BF, I believe that TKD will give more steadier/leaner gains IMO
    I believe that a TCD diet will result is more weight gain but a large proportion of that will be fat as well. I would stick to TKD
    Yes any diet will add muscle mass as long as your protein is right, just make sure you eat at a surplus. If you want to minimalise fat gains eat 200-300 cals above maintenance, if you arent worried about fat gain just eat everything in site ;-)
    If you burn that many calories in a session then just eat 800-1200 calories more, i wouldnt carb up for that just eat more keto food to compensate and take your 50g of TKD carbs pre-workout that day rather than splitting it. I would avoid fruit as this will not go to your muscles, it will go to your liver and replenish glycogen there
    Finally in terms of carbs i would use pure Dextrose, you can get this from most health stores or online, i would take 15-25g pre work out with some protein and the same after on weight days and all pre on your Krav Maga days
    Good luck

    Originally Posted by Phoenix/Rising
    I know that keto is usually considered a fat loss diet, but the fact is that I just plain feel better following a keto diet. Seems like carbs (even low GI ones) really upset my digestive system. Not to be overly graphic, but honestly, it just gives me gas and the runs haha!
    So I've decided that I want to add muscle mass and strength, but I want to stay on a (mostly) ketogenic diet because I just feel better with it. I've heard about three approaches to this:
    - Targeted Ketogenic Diet
    - Cyclical Ketongenic Diet
    - Timed Carbohydrate Diet
    I've heard "TCD" is kind of like "TKD" on "steroids" (some other thread I can't find now) but I have no idea how to work with it. I do understand that in general I need to have carbohydrates before my lifting workout and after, but I'm not sure how to calculate how many, especially given the fact that I'll need an *excess* of calories to spur muscle growth. Not only that, but with that much protein (aiming at about ~250g/day), I'm concerned I'll be knocked out of ketosis.
    So, a few questions:
    - TKD vs. CKD - which leads to better muscle gains?
    - Is TCD realistic, how do you execute it properly (links that I may have missed appreciated) and will I gain as much or more than TKD or CKD on it?
    - Can a properly executed ketogenic mass building diet put on as much muscle as a "standard" bodybuilding diet?
    Now, one more twist.
    I also practice Krav Maga (martial art) twice a week. It's a very intense workout that gets my heart rate way up there for about an hour. Using a heart rate monitor, I once found that my average calorie burn in one of these classes is about 800-1200 calories (no I'm not kidding). My concern is that any gains I'll be making while lifting would be negated by too aerobically an intense workout. Should I just "carb up" prior to these classes (perhaps with some fruit?) and a little after to prevent muscle loss?
    Final question: since my gut doesn't get along so well with bread, pasta, potatoes, etc., (and I hate sweet potatoes, they make me gag, sorry!), is there a good supplement you can recommend instead?
    Thanks in advance

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=================================================== PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHvQ... =================================================== =================================================== Google Plus Profile : Google Plus Profile : https://plus.google.com/u/0/111392267... =================================================== How to Check Feet for Complications of Diabetes Part 1 : Looking for Changes in Foot Sensations 1.Be aware of numbness in your feet. One of the initial and most common symptoms of peripheral neuropathy that diabetics notice is that their feet lose sensation and become numb. 2.Be alert to tingling and burning sensations. Another common symptom is uncomfortable sensations, such as tingling, pins and needles and/or burning pain. 3.Take note of increased sensitivity to touch, called hyperesthesia. Another alteration of foot sensations that develops in a minority of diabetics is an increase in sensitivity to touch. 4.Pay attention to cramps or sharp pains. As the peripheral neuropathy progresses, it starts to affect the muscles of the feet. 5.Be mindful of muscle weakness. As high glucose goes into nerves, water follows glucose by osmosis and also goes into nerves. 6.Check for toe deformities. If the muscles of your feet are weak and your gait is altered, it will likely cause you to walk abnormally and put additional pressure on your toes. 7.Be very cautious with any signs of injury or infection. Aside from falling and breaking a bone while walking, the most serious complication a diabetic faces is an injury to their feet. 8.Look for similar symptoms in your hands. Although peripheral neuropathy typically begins in the lower limbs, specifically the feet, it also eventually effects the smaller peripheral nerves that innervate the fingers, hands and arms. 9.Check yourself for signs of autonomic neuropathy. The autonomic system includes the nerves that automatically control your heart rate, bladder, lungs, stomach, intestines, genitals and eyes. 10.Be alert to changes in your vision. Both peripheral and autonomic neuropathies affect the eyes, as does the destruction of small blood vessels due to glucose toxicity. How to Check Feet for Complications of Diabetes. What happens to your feet when you have diabetes? Why does diabetes lead to amputation? What are diabetic feet? Are sore feet a sign of diabetes? #diabetic feet pictures #early signs of diabetic feet #skin complications of diabetes #diabetic foot treatment #diabetic toe nails #diabetic feet swelling #type 2 diabetes feet #what happens to your feet when you have diabetes +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Our Blog Url : http://tubermentvideos.blogspot.com/ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ati: Chapter 84 Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Sort What are clinical manifestations of DKA polyuria polydipsia polyphagia weightloss GI effects blurred vision, headach eweakness orthostatic hypotension fruity odor of breath Kussmaul respirations metabolic acidosis mental status changes A nurse is reviewing th ehealth record fo a client who has hyperglycemic-hyperosmolar state (HHS) which of the following data confirms this diagnosis? (select all that apply) A. Evidence of recent MI B> BUn 35 mg/dL C. Takes a calcium channel blocker D. Age 77 E. No insulin production A. Evidence of recent MI B Bun 35 mg/dL C. takes calcium channel blocker D. Age 77 A nurse is assessing client who has DKA and ketones in the urine. Which of the following are expected findings (select all that apply) A. Weight gain B. fruity odor of breath C. abdominal pain D. Kussmaul respirations E. Meatabolic acidosis B. fruity odor of breath C. abdominal pain D. Kussmaul respirations E. meatabolic acidosis A nurse is preparing to administer IV fluids to a client who has DKA. Which of the following` is an appropriate nursing action? A. administer an IV infusion of regular insulin at 0.3units/kg/hr B. Administer an IV infusion of 0.45% sodium chloride C. Rapidly Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Fapacwl

    After listening to the latest Tim Ferriss podcast (great listen for KETO people!) he mentioned that supplementing ketones is a great way to ease into ketosis, or create ketosis for a short period of time. I then googled ketone supplements and only saw "raspberry ketone for weight loss" which seemed sketchy. Ferris describes taking ketones as drinking jet fuel, so idk if his stuff is for the faint of heart, but I was wondering if anyone takes ketone supplements and where did they get them.
    Thanks for any advice, I am asking about this because I'm lazy and he made it seem like this is an easy way to do ketosis..
    Edit: link to podcast
    http://fourhourworkweek.com/2015/11/03/dominic-dagostino/

  2. simsalabimbam

    Some people get caught up with all kinds of weight loss nonsense, supplementing keto salts is nonsense for weight-loss.
    Ketones don't cause weight-loss. Having ketones is the biomarker that you are:
    making glucose
    predominantly metabolising fat
    Under these conditions ketones are produced as a necessary and beneficial by-product.
    Taking keto salts or MCT oil will give you ketones without the benefits associated with nutritional ketosis. Ketone supplementation on top of a ketogenic diet is mostly useful for people with intractable epilepsy suffering dozens of seizures per day.

  3. super_toilet

    Far from expert, but the whole point of keto is that your body will burn fat and make all the ketones it needs from that fat. If you're taking ketones that meas you're body isn't burning fat to make them. These businesses aren't interested in helping you burn fat as much as they are interested in helping you burn cash.

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What is HYPERNATREMIA? What does HYPERNATREMIA mean? HYPERNATREMIA meaning - HYPERNATREMIA pronunciation - HYPERNATREMIA definition - HYPERNATREMIA explanation - How to pronounce HYPERNATREMIA? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Hypernatremia is a high sodium ion level in the blood. Early symptoms may include a strong feeling of thirst, weakness, nausea, and loss of appetite. Severe symptoms include confusion, muscle twitching, and bleeding in or around the brain. Normal serum sodium levels are 135 - 145 mmol/L (135 - 145 mEq/L). Hypernatremia is generally defined as a serum sodium level of more than 145 mmol/L. Severe symptoms typically only occur when levels are above 160 mmol/L. Hypernatremia is typically classified by a person's fluid status into low volume, normal volume, and high volume. Low volume hypernatremia can occur from sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, diuretic medication, or kidney disease. Normal volume hypernatremia can be due to fever, inappropriately decreased thirst, prolonged increased breath rate, diabetes insipidus, and from lithium among other causes. High volume hypernatremia can be due to hyperaldosteronism, be health care caused such as when too much intravenous 3% normal saline or sodium bicarbonate is given, or rarely be from eating too much salt. Low blood protein levels can result in a falsely high sodium measurement. The cause can usually be determined by the history of events. Testing the urine can help if the cause is unclear. If the onset of hypernatremia was over a few hours, then it can be corrected relatively quickly using intravenous normal saline and 5% dextrose. Otherwise correction should occur slowly with, for those unable to drink water, half-normal saline. Hypernatremia due to diabetes insipidus as a result of a brain disorder, may be treated with the medication desmopressin. If the diabetes insipidus is due to kidney problems the medication which is causing it may need to be stopped. Hypernatremia affects 0.3-1% of people in hospital. It most often occurs in babies, those with impaired mental status, and the elderly. Hypernatremia is associated with an increased risk of death but it is unclear if it is the cause. The major symptom is thirst. The most important signs result from brain cell shrinkage and include confusion, muscle twitching or spasms. With severe elevations, seizures and comas may occur. Severe symptoms are usually due to acute elevation of the plasma sodium concentration to above 157 mmol/L (normal blood levels are generally about 135145 mmol/L for adults and elderly). Values above 180 mmol/L are associated with a high mortality rate, particularly in adults. However, such high levels of sodium rarely occur without severe coexisting medical conditions. Serum sodium concentrations have ranged from 150228 mmol/L in survivors of acute salt overdosage, while levels of 153255 mmol/L have been observed in fatalities. Vitreous humor is considered to be a better postmortem specimen than postmortem serum for assessing sodium involvement in a death. The cornerstone of treatment is administration of free water to correct the relative water deficit. Water can be replaced orally or intravenously. Water alone cannot be administered intravenously (because of osmolarity issue), but rather can be given with addition to dextrose or saline infusion solutions. However, overly rapid correction of hypernatremia is potentially very dangerous. The body (in particular the brain) adapts to the higher sodium concentration. Rapidly lowering the sodium concentration with free water, once this adaptation has occurred, causes water to flow into brain cells and causes them to swell. This can lead to cerebral edema, potentially resulting in seizures, permanent brain damage, or death. Therefore, significant hypernatremia should be treated carefully by a physician or other medical professional with experience in treatment of electrolyte imbalance, specific treatment like ACE inhibitors in heart failure and corticosteroids in nephropathy also can be used.

Nclex-rn Prep--hypernatremia Vs Hyponatremia | Ati Nursing | Pinterest | Nclex Rn, Nclex And Hyponatremia

First r/penmanshipporn post - nursing school notes, any tips? Post with 23428 views. First r/penmanshipporn post - nursing school notes, any tips? except that in vet med we don't really have SIADH to fall back on. 7 Steps to a Healthier Heart in 2017 Congenital Heart Defects Electrolytes 101 + Homemade Sports Drinks Electrolytes ~~ wow I wish I knew this a long time ago. magnesium & potassium (I know I saw some other drawings by this person that looked useful Med student flash cards - pretty darn close to what us nurses/nursing students study. Concept map that explains diabetic ketoacidosis causes, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. This map links between all aspects of DKA to simplify understanding and memorization. ATI TEAS 6 Test Breakdown-The ATI TEAS 6 Test is a standard exam that is required for preadmission for those who are wishing to attend nursing school. 47 Medical-Surgical Nursing Flashcards & Memory Aids NCLEX online nursing education for all nurses, all nursing students and healthcare professionals. QD Nurses is the one-stop source for every day nursing! Tips on Studying for the ATI Nursing Test Tips on Studying for the ATI Nursing Test | eHow Common Laborato Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. asscheekscarlus

    so it's been about a week since i have started the diet. i use a keto app to track what i eat and to try to reach my goals. over the past week my diet has consisted of 0-5% carbs daily, 20-25% protein daily, and 75-80% fat daily. I have been using those cheap ketone test strips to check if i was in ketosis, and for the first few days it was getting darker until yesterday when it came out somewhat lighter. Also checked earlier today and got the same results. im not sure if it's the test strips or if i'm simply not in ketosis. Although, in the one week of this diet i've gone through the keto flu already and lost about 8 pounds (probably water weight). if anyone has any advice it would be much appreciated!

  2. Default87

    keto macros are in grams, percentages mean nothing.

    piss sticks are not the correct tool for nutritional ketosis. they are not telling you the information you think they are.

    if you have been eating 20g net carbs or less for 2-3 days, and are still alive, you are in ketosis.

  3. RedWong15

    If you're losing water weight like that you're on the way. Just stick with it and don't worry about the strip things.

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