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Dka Ketone Levels

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can occur in diabetes. DKA happens when acidic substances, called ketones, build up in your body. Ketones are formed when your body burns fat for fuel instead of sugar, or glucose. That can happen if you don’t have enough insulin in your body to help you process sugars. Learn more: Ketosis vs. ketoacidosis: What you should know » Left untreated, ketones can build up to dangerous levels. DKA can occur in people who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but it’s rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA can also develop if you are at risk for diabetes, but have not received a formal diagnosis. It can be the first sign of type 1 diabetes. DKA is a medical emergency. Call your local emergency services immediately if you think you are experiencing DKA. Symptoms of DKA can appear quickly and may include: frequent urination extreme thirst high blood sugar levels high levels of ketones in the urine nausea or vomiting abdominal pain confusion fruity-smelling breath a flushed face fatigue rapid breathing dry mouth and skin It is important to make sure you consult with your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. If left untreated, Continue reading >>

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  1. BaconChick

    Hi!
    I know there's lots of short ladies out there like me that have low calorie requirements... I'm looking for meal ideas....
    I find that alot of the keto recipes I find add up quick in calories! Especially if I want to make a keto-friendly bun, once I add the bun to a bacon cheese burger the calories are almost half my daily allowance!
    (I'm not eating bacon cheese burgers all the time, just an example)

  2. Vudell

    A few of my go-to meals:
    Tuna/egg salad: 1 can of tuna, 2 hard boiled eggs, 2 thin pickle slices, a serving (100cals) of mayo, squirt of mustard. 360 calories, 22g fat, 2 carbs, 37g protein.
    Zucchini noodle with meat sauce: 1 small/medium zucchini, 4 ounces ground beef (85% lean), tomato/basil sauce (found the lowest carb I could find, 6 net carb per half cup), 1 TBSP parmesan cheese. 400 calories, 21g fat, 11 net carbs, 35g protein.
    Zucchini noodle alfredo style: 1 small/medium zucchini, 1.75 oz bacon ends, 1/4th cup alfredo sauce, 1/4th TBSP butter. 400 calories, 39g fat, 4 net carbs, 7.3g protein.
    Bacon ends/pieces and eggs, which reheat well enough that I take it to work for lunch if I'm in a pinch for time: 1oz bacon ends, 2 eggs, 1/2 TBSP heavy cream, 1/2 TBSP butter. 370 calories, 34g fat, 1 carb, 15g protein.
    Antipasta salad: 1 cup romaine, 1oz provolone cheese, 4 pimento stuffed olives, 3 slices dry salami, 1 TBSP italian dressing. 231 calories, 18g fat, 4 net carbs, 12g protein.

  3. [deleted]

    Yum @ all of that.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency rela Continue reading >>

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  1. glasstambourine

    I've struggled with anxiety and depression in the past, but it hasn't been an issue for me for about four years. Ever since I started keto about five weeks ago, I have been getting random anxiety and mild panic attacks. For example, a few nights ago I was sitting on the couch with my boyfriend watching RuPauls Drag Race (which usually makes me laugh and smile nonstop) and I just started freaking out. It happens a lot at night when I am going to sleep as well. I have several nightmares a week, usually involving someone trying to kill me. Nothing in my life has changed recently other than my diet. I consider myself to be a very happy, social, and laid back woman.
    Just curious is anyone else has experienced this. For the record, I absolutely love keto. I've never felt stronger, more energetic, and in control of my food intake in my life.

  2. glasstambourine

    Just ordered some Natural Calm on amazon per your recommendation. The only liquid sweetener I use is liquid stevia, so ill cut that out for a week to see if it makes a difference.
    I drink over a gallon of water a day. I did before keto even, I just happen to love ice water and sparkling water.
    Thank you for your thoughtful response. Knowing other people have similar issues is comforting.

  3. [deleted]

    Natural calm is easily absorbed by the body. You may only need it once or twice a week. Your body will let you know. Any that isn't needed will give you loose stools. So go easy on it at first. I heat up a few ounces of water, add the powder and when its done fizzing I add cold water. I still have the box I ordered a few months ago. :)

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose Continue reading >>

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  1. KinkingPump

    Hi
    A few weeks ago I was admitted to A&E- long story short my sugar was up around 35 as my pump had kinked, I was vomiting up everything. The sugar had been rising for about 12 hours, the first ketone reading I did practically turned the dip stick black, but within 4 hours it was coming back as no ketones (I know how to down water!) and my BS 7.
    I had an easy day the following day and just slept, drank loads of water and then started trying to do "normal" routine stuff the day after that. It took about a week before I was back to normal, I felt crampy and achey, couldn't concetrate on anything and just wanted to sleep! Is there any way of speeding this recovery up? How long does "recovery" take from an episode like this until you feel normal in yourself again? And how do people manage with work- I was getting tellings off for my lack of concentration, I didn't want to go on the sick per se as I didn't feel that I needed to be home in bed, but equally I wasn't capable of performing (I'm an engineer- not a physical labourer, someone who does calculations and lots of sums!)... What should I have done?
    Thanks for any responses, experiences and tips would be really appreciated- I've been diabetic since I was 9 (now 22) and this is the first time I've had real problems (was a teenager with HBAs in the teens on injections, and only been on a pump 9 months with a HBA of 8 now so guessing I'm a lot more sensitive to the highs that I was before!)

  2. SimonClifford

    I kinked mine last night. Was awoken by the pump's blocked-cannula alarm (Aviva Combo), thankfully & nothing untoward had happened.
    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App

  3. Lady_luce_x

    I had DKA just before I went on my pump, which was caused initially by a sickness bug. i was on placement for my university degree at the time. I was in hospital for about 24 hours, and then my mum took me home. I had 3 days off to recover, and like you said mainly just slept and drank water. The week following I felt very crampy and achey, and i think it took a week or so to feel "normal" again. Now if my pump ever messes up (on friday night it disconnected over night) and i ended up with ketones, i recovered without need of A&E but I felt rubbish yesterday (tired, crampy, irritable) and today I'm not feeling 100%. I think once youve had a high level of ketones it takes awhile for your body to recover, they are "poisonous toxins" afterall. Hope you feel better soon

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