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Dka Hypernatremia

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What is FLUID DEPRIVATION TEST? What does FLUID DEPRIVATION TEST mean? FLUID DEPRIVATION TEST meaning - FLUID DEPRIVATION TEST definition - FLUID DEPRIVATION TEST explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... A fluid or water deprivation test is a medical test which can be used to determine whether the patient has diabetes insipidus as opposed to other causes of polydipsia (a condition of excessive thirst that causes an excessive intake of water). The patient is required, for a prolonged period, to forgo intake of water completely, to determine the cause of the thirst. This test measures changes in body weight, urine output, and urine composition when fluids are withheld. Sometimes measuring blood levels of ADH (a synonym for vasopressin) during this test is also necessary. If there is no change in the water loss despite fluid deprivation, desmopressin may be administered to distinguish between the two types of diabetes insipidus which are central & nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. The time of deprivation may vary from 4 to 18 hours. The serum osmolality and urine osmolality are both measured in the test.

Does Fluid Choice Make Any Difference In Dka?

Your patient is a 21 year-old female with a history of type 1 diabetes mellitus who was brought to the ED by her boyfriend for diminished responsiveness. In a stupor, she is unable to give any history. Her vitals are: BP 102/66, pulse 120, respiratory rate 24, temperature 98.9 oral, and O2 saturation 98% on room air. Her finger stick glucose is >500 mg/dl. She looks dry and is somnolent (GCS 9). Pupils are equal, round, and reactive. Neck is supple. She is protecting her airway well, her lungs are clear, and you hear no murmurs. Her belly is soft, and you see no signs of trauma or exanthema. Her skin tents when you pinch it. She is moving all extremities in response to noxious stimulus. As the rest of her labs (including serum osmolality and cultures, of course!) are sent off, her boyfriend tells you that she has not been taking her medications over the past 2 weeks and has had symptoms consistent with polydipsia and polyuria most noticeably over the past few days. A rapid shock panel returns with a glucose level of >500 mg/dl, pH 7.2, bicarbonate 10, and a urine dipstick shows large ketones. These confirm your suspicion of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). You wait for further results Continue reading >>

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    can anyone plz tell me what happens to the Na and K levels in DKA.kaplan says there is hypernatremia and hypokalemia.

  2. frontal

    There is no hypernatremia in DKA. There is electrolyte loss in DKA primariy due to hyperglycemia causing osmotic diuresis, so the patient is depleted of both Na and K, but the serum levels of potassium maybe normal or even elevated. This is because of a disproportionate loss of water (osmotic diuresis) and because of acidosis, which forces the hydrogen ions into cells in exchange for K ions. Remember: a patient with DKA is potassium depleted, even if serum potassium values are on the higher side at presentation. Renal loss continues and as treatment with insulin is started, a fall in serum potassium is likely to be observed because insulin pushes the K ions back into the cells. Electrolye monitoring is necessary while treating the patient, so that insulin dose can be adjusted and fluids given appropriately.

  3. frontal

    A normal serum sodium level in DKA would indicate profound dehydration.

  4. -> Continue reading
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DKA and HHS (HHNS) nursing NCLEX lecture review of the treatment, patient signs/symptoms, and management. Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemia nonketotic syndrome are two complications that can present in diabetes mellitus. DKA is more common in type 1 diabetics, whereas, HHNS is more common in type 2 diabetics. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis will present with ketosis and acidosis and signs/symptoms will include hyperglycemia (greater than 300 mg/dL), Kussmaul breathing, fruity (acetone breath), ketones in the urine, and metabolic acidosis. Patients with hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome will NOT have ketosis or acidosis but EXTREME hyperglycemia (greater than 600 mg/dL). In addition, hyperosmolarity will present which will cause major osmotic diuresis and the patient will experience with severe dehydration. Quiz on DKA vs HHNS: http://www.registerednursern.com/dka-... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/dka-... Diabetes NCLEX Review Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Video on DKA (detailed lecture): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxrCV... Video on HHNS (detailed lecture): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyExA... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemia — A Brief Review

Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemia — A Brief Review SPECIAL FEATURE By Richard J. Wall, MD, MPH, Pulmonary Critical Care & Sleep Disorders Medicine, Southlake Clinic, Valley Medical Center, Renton, WA. Dr. Wall reports no financial relationships relevant to this field of study. Financial Disclosure: Critical Care Alert's editor, David J. Pierson, MD, nurse planner Leslie A. Hoffman, PhD, RN, peer reviewer William Thompson, MD, executive editor Leslie Coplin, and managing editor Neill Kimball report no financial relationships relevant to this field of study. INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are two of the most common and serious acute complications of diabetes mellitus. DKA is responsible for more than 500,000 hospital days annually in the United States, at an estimated annual cost of $2.4 billion. Both conditions are part of the spectrum of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and there is sometimes overlap between them. This article will discuss and compare the two conditions, with a focus on key clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. DIAGNOSTIC FEATURES In DKA, there is an accumulation of ketoacids along with a h Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. launchpad

    can anyone plz tell me what happens to the Na and K levels in DKA.kaplan says there is hypernatremia and hypokalemia.

  2. frontal

    There is no hypernatremia in DKA. There is electrolyte loss in DKA primariy due to hyperglycemia causing osmotic diuresis, so the patient is depleted of both Na and K, but the serum levels of potassium maybe normal or even elevated. This is because of a disproportionate loss of water (osmotic diuresis) and because of acidosis, which forces the hydrogen ions into cells in exchange for K ions. Remember: a patient with DKA is potassium depleted, even if serum potassium values are on the higher side at presentation. Renal loss continues and as treatment with insulin is started, a fall in serum potassium is likely to be observed because insulin pushes the K ions back into the cells. Electrolye monitoring is necessary while treating the patient, so that insulin dose can be adjusted and fluids given appropriately.

  3. frontal

    A normal serum sodium level in DKA would indicate profound dehydration.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In this video, Dr. Michael Agus discusses the risk factors, signs, symptoms, and treatment of cerebral edema in diabetic ketoacidosis. Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: [email protected] Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Cerebral Edema

Elliot J. Krane, M.D. Departments of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology Stanford University Medical Center Introduction In 1922 Banting and Best introduced insulin into clinical practice. A decade later the first reported case of cerebral edema complicating diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was reported by Dillon, Riggs and Dyer writing in the pathology literature. While the syndrome of cerebral edema complicating DKA was either not seen, ignored, or was unrecognized by the medical community until 3 decades later when the complication was again reported by Young and Bradley at the Joslin Clinic, there has since been a flurry of case reports in the 1960's and 1970's and basic and clinical research from the 1970's to the 1990's leading to our present day acceptance of this as a known complication of DKA, or of the management of DKA. In fact, we now recognize that the cerebral complications of DKA (including much less frequent cerebral arterial infarctions, venous sinus thrombosis, and central nervous system infections) are the most common cause of diabetic-related death of young diabetic patients (1), accounting for 31% of deaths associated with DKA and 20% of all diabetic deaths, having surpas Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. launchpad

    can anyone plz tell me what happens to the Na and K levels in DKA.kaplan says there is hypernatremia and hypokalemia.

  2. frontal

    There is no hypernatremia in DKA. There is electrolyte loss in DKA primariy due to hyperglycemia causing osmotic diuresis, so the patient is depleted of both Na and K, but the serum levels of potassium maybe normal or even elevated. This is because of a disproportionate loss of water (osmotic diuresis) and because of acidosis, which forces the hydrogen ions into cells in exchange for K ions. Remember: a patient with DKA is potassium depleted, even if serum potassium values are on the higher side at presentation. Renal loss continues and as treatment with insulin is started, a fall in serum potassium is likely to be observed because insulin pushes the K ions back into the cells. Electrolye monitoring is necessary while treating the patient, so that insulin dose can be adjusted and fluids given appropriately.

  3. frontal

    A normal serum sodium level in DKA would indicate profound dehydration.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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