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Dka Hyperkalemia Or Hypokalemia

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BLOG: https://magnesiumman.squarespace.com/ INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/magnesium_m... MAGNESIUM I USE: http://magnesiumman.squarespace.com/t... In this video I compare using magnesium oil (spray) and magnesium bath flakes. Both provide the same amazing mineral, but both also have their pros and cons. Magnesium Oil pros: Convenient, quick, easy to travel with, can be used orally and on the skin. Magnesium Oil cons: Can irritate the skin, hard to get a lot of dosage, takes a lot of effort to rub into skin. Magnesium Bath Flakes pros: Can absorb large amounts of magnesium in one bath, very therapeutic and relaxing, can also add essential oils, full body absorption. Magnesium Bath Flakes cons: Takes much more time (bare minimum 15 minutes), need a bath, hard to travel with flakes, need a lot of flakes. I enjoy using both. I think the most effective for getting the most magnesium into your body is the bath flakes. I also find it very relaxing and great to do before bed or after a workout. I order bath flakes in bulk. I try to do 2-3 baths a week, and use the spray regularly each day. The spray bottle is fantastic to travel with and use on the run!

Chapter 250. Potassium And Magnesium Disorders

Chapter 250. Potassium and Magnesium Disorders Steven M. Gorbatkin, MD, PhD; Lynn Schlanger, MD; James L. Bailey, MD Gorbatkin SM, Schlanger L, Bailey JL. Gorbatkin S.M., Schlanger L, Bailey J.L. Gorbatkin, Steven M., et al.Chapter 250. Potassium and Magnesium Disorders. In: McKean SC, Ross JJ, Dressler DD, Brotman DJ, Ginsberg JS. McKean S.C., Ross J.J., Dressler D.D., Brotman D.J., Ginsberg J.S. Eds. Sylvia C. McKean, et al.eds. Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2012. Accessed April 14, 2018. Gorbatkin SM, Schlanger L, Bailey JL. Gorbatkin S.M., Schlanger L, Bailey J.L. Gorbatkin, Steven M., et al.. "Chapter 250. Potassium and Magnesium Disorders." Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine McKean SC, Ross JJ, Dressler DD, Brotman DJ, Ginsberg JS. McKean S.C., Ross J.J., Dressler D.D., Brotman D.J., Ginsberg J.S. Eds. Sylvia C. McKean, et al. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2012, What are the causes of potassium and magnesium disorders? What are the potential consequences of potassium and magnesium disorders? How are potassium and magnesium disorders treated? How are potassium disorders treated in clinical situations with rapid potassium shifts Continue reading >>

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  1. gear2d

    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH

  2. blade

    USMLE Forums Guru

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gear2d
    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss

  3. gear2d

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by blade
    Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss This is from Step to Med 3rd ed on page312 in the flow diagram.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Malaise, generalized weakness, and fatigability Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia Rapid weight loss in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: Gl Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. gear2d

    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH

  2. blade

    USMLE Forums Guru

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gear2d
    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss

  3. gear2d

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by blade
    Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss This is from Step to Med 3rd ed on page312 in the flow diagram.

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

A 12 year old boy, previously healthy, is admitted to the hospital after 2 days of polyuria, polyphagia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Vital signs are: Temp 37C, BP 103/63 mmHg, HR 112, RR 30. Physical exam shows a lethargic boy. Labs are notable forWBC 16,000,Glucose 534, K 5.9, pH 7.13, PCO2 is 20 mmHg, PO2 is 90 mmHg. result of insulin, glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine increased tidal volume and rate as a result of metabolic acidosis due to gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis tissues unable to use the high glucose as it is unable to enter cells anion gap due to ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis consumed in an attempt to buffer the increased acid glucose acts as an osmotic agent and draws water from ICF to ECF acidosis results in ICF/ECF exchange of H+ for K+ depletion of total body potassium due to cellular shift and losses through urine -hydroxybutyrate not detected with normal ketone body tests due to in capillary lipoprotein lipase activity H2PO4- is increased in urine, as it is titratable acid used to buffer the excess H+ that is being excreted must prevent resultant hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia labs may show pseudo-hyperkalemia prior to administartion of fluid Continue reading >>

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  1. metalmd06

    Does acute DKA cause hyperkalemia, or is the potassium normal or low due to osmotic diuresis? I get the acute affect of metabolic acidosis on potassium (K+ shifts from intracellular to extracellular compartments). According to MedEssentials, the initial response (<24 hours) is increased serum potassium. The chronic effect occuring within 24 hours is a compensatory increase in Aldosterone that normalizes or ultimatley decreases the serum K+. Then it says on another page that because of osmotic diuresis, there is K+ wasting with DKA. On top of that, I had a question about a diabetic patient in DKA with signs of hyperkalemia. Needless to say, I'm a bit confused. Any help is appreciated.

  2. FutureDoc4

    I remember this being a tricky point:
    1) DKA leads to a decreased TOTAL body K+ (due to diuresis) (increase urine flow, increase K+ loss)
    2) Like you said, during DKA, acidosis causes an exchange of H+/K+ leading to hyperkalemia.
    So, TOTAL body K+ is low, but the patient presents with hyperkalemia. Why is this important? Give, insulin, pushes the K+ back into the cells and can quickly precipitate hypokalemia and (which we all know is bad). Hope that is helpful.

  3. Cooolguy

    DKA-->Anion gap M. Acidosis-->K+ shift to extracellular component--> hyperkalemia-->symptoms and signs
    DKA--> increased osmoles-->Osmotic diuresis-->loss of K+ in urine-->decreased total body K+ (because more has been seeped from the cells)
    --dont confuse total body K+ with EC K+
    Note: osmotic diuresis also causes polyuria, ketonuria, glycosuria, and loss of Na+ in urine--> Hyponatremia
    DKA tx: Insulin (helps put K+ back into cells), and K+ (to replenish the low total potassium
    Hope it helps

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