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Dka Hyperkalemia Or Hypokalemia

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Producing Extreme Hyperkalemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes On Hemodialysis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Producing Extreme Hyperkalemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes On Hemodialysis

Go to: Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a critical complication of type 1 diabetes associated with water and electrolyte disorders. Here, we report a case of DKA with extreme hyperkalemia (9.0 mEq/L) in a patient with type 1 diabetes on hemodialysis. He had a left frontal cerebral infarction resulting in inability to manage his continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump. Electrocardiography showed typical changes of hyperkalemia, including absent P waves, prolonged QRS interval and tented T waves. There was no evidence of total body water deficit. After starting insulin and rapid hemodialysis, the serum potassium level was normalized. Although DKA may present with hypokalemia, rapid hemodialysis may be necessary to resolve severe hyperkalemia in a patient with renal failure. Learning points: Patients with type 1 diabetes on hemodialysis may develop ketoacidosis because of discontinuation of insulin treatment. Patients on hemodialysis who develop ketoacidosis may have hyperkalemia because of anuria. Absolute insulin deficit alters potassium distribution between the intracellular and extracellular space, and anuria abolishes urinary excretion of potassium. Rapid hemodialysis along with intensive insulin therapy can improve hyperkalemia, while fluid infusions may worsen heart failure in patients with ketoacidosis who routinely require hemodialysis. Go to: Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a very common endocrinology emergency. It is usually associated with severe circulatory volume depletion. Management of fluids, metabolic acidosis and electrolyte disorders is mandatory. In DKA, mild-to-moderate elevation of serum potassium is usually seen despite total body potassium wasting (1). After intravenous insulin infusion to treat DKA, even if the initial serum Continue reading >>

On The Relationship Between Potassium And Acid-base Balance

On The Relationship Between Potassium And Acid-base Balance

The notion that acid-base and potassium homeostasis are linked is well known. Students of laboratory medicine will learn that in general acidemia (reduced blood pH) is associated with increased plasma potassium concentration (hyperkalemia), whilst alkalemia (increased blood pH) is associated with reduced plasma potassium concentration (hypokalemia). A frequently cited mechanism for these findings is that acidosis causes potassium to move from cells to extracellular fluid (plasma) in exchange for hydrogen ions, and alkalosis causes the reverse movement of potassium and hydrogen ions. As a recently published review makes clear, all the above may well be true, but it represents a gross oversimplification of the complex ways in which disorders of acid-base affect potassium metabolism and disorders of potassium affect acid-base balance. The review begins with an account of potassium homeostasis with particular detailed attention to the renal handling of potassium and regulation of potassium excretion in urine. This discussion includes detail of the many cellular mechanisms of potassium reabsorption and secretion throughout the renal tubule and collecting duct that ensure, despite significant variation in dietary intake, that plasma potassium remains within narrow, normal limits. There follows discussion of the ways in which acid-base disturbances affect these renal cellular mechanisms of potassium handling. For example, it is revealed that acidosis decreases potassium secretion in the distal renal tubule directly by effect on potassium secretory channels and indirectly by increasing ammonia production. The clinical consequences of the physiological relation between acid-base and potassium homeostasis are addressed under three headings: Hyperkalemia in Acidosis; Hypokalemia w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

A 12 year old boy, previously healthy, is admitted to the hospital after 2 days of polyuria, polyphagia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Vital signs are: Temp 37C, BP 103/63 mmHg, HR 112, RR 30. Physical exam shows a lethargic boy. Labs are notable forWBC 16,000,Glucose 534, K 5.9, pH 7.13, PCO2 is 20 mmHg, PO2 is 90 mmHg. result of insulin, glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine increased tidal volume and rate as a result of metabolic acidosis due to gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis tissues unable to use the high glucose as it is unable to enter cells anion gap due to ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis consumed in an attempt to buffer the increased acid glucose acts as an osmotic agent and draws water from ICF to ECF acidosis results in ICF/ECF exchange of H+ for K+ depletion of total body potassium due to cellular shift and losses through urine -hydroxybutyrate not detected with normal ketone body tests due to in capillary lipoprotein lipase activity H2PO4- is increased in urine, as it is titratable acid used to buffer the excess H+ that is being excreted must prevent resultant hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia labs may show pseudo-hyperkalemia prior to administartion of fluid and insulin due to transcellular shift of potassium out of the cells to balance the H+ being transfered into the cells Upon administration of insulin, potassium will shift intracellularly, possibly resulting in dangerous hypokalemia give phosphatesupplementation to prevent respiratory paralysis (M1.EC.31) A 17-year-old male presents to your office complaining of polyuria, polydipsia, and unintentional weight loss of 12 pounds over the past 3 months. On physical examination, the patient is tachypneic with labored breathing. Which of the following electrolyte abnormalities would you most likely Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Author: Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Malaise, generalized weakness, and fatigability Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia Rapid weight loss in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: Glaser NS, Marcin JP, Wootton-Gorges SL, et al. Correlation of clinical and biochemical findings with diabetic ketoacidosis-related cerebral edema in children using magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging. J Pediatr. 2008 Jun 25. [Medline] . Umpierrez GE, Jones S, Smiley D, et al. Insulin analogs versus human insulin in the treatment of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis: a randomized controlled trial. Diabetes Care. 2009 Jul. 32(7):1164-9. [Medline] . [Full Text] . Herrington WG, Nye HJ, Hammersley MS, Watkinson PJ. Are arterial and venous samples clinically equivalent for the estimation Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Chapter 250. Potassium And Magnesium Disorders

Chapter 250. Potassium And Magnesium Disorders

Chapter 250. Potassium and Magnesium Disorders Steven M. Gorbatkin, MD, PhD; Lynn Schlanger, MD; James L. Bailey, MD Gorbatkin SM, Schlanger L, Bailey JL. Gorbatkin S.M., Schlanger L, Bailey J.L. Gorbatkin, Steven M., et al.Chapter 250. Potassium and Magnesium Disorders. In: McKean SC, Ross JJ, Dressler DD, Brotman DJ, Ginsberg JS. McKean S.C., Ross J.J., Dressler D.D., Brotman D.J., Ginsberg J.S. Eds. Sylvia C. McKean, et al.eds. Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2012. Accessed April 14, 2018. Gorbatkin SM, Schlanger L, Bailey JL. Gorbatkin S.M., Schlanger L, Bailey J.L. Gorbatkin, Steven M., et al.. "Chapter 250. Potassium and Magnesium Disorders." Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine McKean SC, Ross JJ, Dressler DD, Brotman DJ, Ginsberg JS. McKean S.C., Ross J.J., Dressler D.D., Brotman D.J., Ginsberg J.S. Eds. Sylvia C. McKean, et al. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2012, What are the causes of potassium and magnesium disorders? What are the potential consequences of potassium and magnesium disorders? How are potassium and magnesium disorders treated? How are potassium disorders treated in clinical situations with rapid potassium shifts, such as diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state, and periodic paralysis? Potassium and magnesium disorders are common in the hospital setting. About 12% of hospitalized patients have hypokalemia, 3% have hyperkalemia, and 11% have hypomagnesemia. Potassium disorders are a particular challenge for hospitalists, as the first clinical manifestation of a severe potassium abnormality may be a cardiac arrhythmia. Potassium (K+) is the most abundant intracellular cation. In a 70 kg adult, the total body K+ is approximately 3500 mmol (50 mmol/kg). About 98% is located in the intracel Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology University of Khartoum, Sudan Introduction DKA is a serious acute complications of Diabetes Mellitus. It carries significant risk of death and/or morbidity especially with delayed treatment. The prognosis of DKA is worse in the extremes of age, with a mortality rates of 5-10%. With the new advances of therapy, DKA mortality decreases to > 2%. Before discovery and use of Insulin (1922) the mortality was 100%. Epidemiology DKA is reported in 2-5% of known type 1 diabetic patients in industrialized countries, while it occurs in 35-40% of such patients in Africa. DKA at the time of first diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is reported in only 2-3% in western Europe, but is seen in 95% of diabetic children in Sudan. Similar results were reported from other African countries . Consequences The latter observation is annoying because it implies the following: The late diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in many developing countries particularly in Africa. The late presentation of DKA, which is associated with risk of morbidity & mortality Death of young children with DKA undiagnosed or wrongly diagnosed as malaria or meningitis. Pathophysiology Secondary to insulin deficiency, and the action of counter-regulatory hormones, blood glucose increases leading to hyperglycemia and glucosuria. Glucosuria causes an osmotic diuresis, leading to water & Na loss. In the absence of insulin activity the body fails to utilize glucose as fuel and uses fats instead. This leads to ketosis. Pathophysiology/2 The excess of ketone bodies will cause metabolic acidosis, the later is also aggravated by Lactic acidosis caused by dehydration & poor tissue perfusion. Vomiting due to an ileus, plus increased insensible water losses due to tachypnea will worsen the state of dehydr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia (high Blood Potassium)

Hyperkalemia (high Blood Potassium)

How does hyperkalemia affect the body? Potassium is critical for the normal functioning of the muscles, heart, and nerves. It plays an important role in controlling activity of smooth muscle (such as the muscle found in the digestive tract) and skeletal muscle (muscles of the extremities and torso), as well as the muscles of the heart. It is also important for normal transmission of electrical signals throughout the nervous system within the body. Normal blood levels of potassium are critical for maintaining normal heart electrical rhythm. Both low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia) and high blood potassium levels (hyperkalemia) can lead to abnormal heart rhythms. The most important clinical effect of hyperkalemia is related to electrical rhythm of the heart. While mild hyperkalemia probably has a limited effect on the heart, moderate hyperkalemia can produce EKG changes (EKG is a reading of theelectrical activity of the heart muscles), and severe hyperkalemia can cause suppression of electrical activity of the heart and can cause the heart to stop beating. Another important effect of hyperkalemia is interference with functioning of the skeletal muscles. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a rare inherited disorder in which patients can develop sudden onset of hyperkalemia which in turn causes muscle paralysis. The reason for the muscle paralysis is not clearly understood, but it is probably due to hyperkalemia suppressing the electrical activity of the muscle. Common electrolytes that are measured by doctors with blood testing include sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate. The functions and normal range values for these electrolytes are described below. Hypokalemia, or decreased potassium, can arise due to kidney diseases; excessive losses due to heavy sweating Continue reading >>

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Lack of insulin, thus no proper metabolism of glucose, ketones form, pH goes down, H+ concentration rises, our body tries to compensate by exchanging K+ from inside the cells for H+ outside the cells, hoping to lower H+ concentration, but at the same time elevating serum potassium. Most people are seriously dehydrated, so are in acute kidney failure, thus the kidneys aren’t able to excrete the excess of potassium from the blood, compounding the problem. On the other hand, many in reality are severely potassium depleted, so once lots of fluid so rehydration and a little insulin is administered serum potassium will plummet, so needs to be monitored 2 hourly - along with glucose, sodium and kidney function - to prevent severe hypokalemia causing fatal arrhythmias, like we experienced decades ago when this wasn’t so well understood yet. In practice, once the patient started peeing again, we started adding potassium chloride to our infusion fluids, the surplus potassium would be peed out by our kidneys so no risk for hyperkalemia. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Definition: A hyperglycemic, acidotic state caused by insulin deficiency. The disease state consists of 3 parameters: Hyperglycemia (glucose > 250 mg/dl) Acidosis Ketosis Epidemiology Incidence of ~ 10,000 cases/year in US Mortality rate: 2-5% (prior to insulin was 100%) (Lebovitz 1995) Pathophysiology Insulin deficiency leads to serum glucose rise Increased glucose load in kidney leads to increased glucose in urine and osmotic diuresis Osmotic diuresis is accompanied by loss of electrolytes including sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium Volume depletion leads to impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) Inability to properly metabolize glucose results in fatty acid breakdown with resultant ketone bodies (acetoacetate + beta-hydroxybutyrate) Causes: An acute insult leads to decompensation of a chronic disease. Can also be first manifestation of new onset diabetes (particularly in children). Below are common triggers Infection (particularly sepsis) Myocardial ischemia or infarction Medication non-compliance Clinical Presentation History Polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia Weakness Weight loss Nausea/Vomiting Abdominal Pain Physical Examination Acetone odor on breath (“fruity” smell) Kussmaul’s respirations – deep fast breathing (tachypnea and hyperpnea) Tachycardia Hypotension Altered mental status Abdominal tenderness Diagnostic Testing Definitive diagnosis is established by laboratory criteria as detailed above (hyperglycemia, ketosis and acidosis) Essential Diagnostic Tests Serum glucose Typically > 350 mg/dL Euglycemic DKA (< 300 mg/dL) reported in up to 18% of patients Blood gas Patients will exhibit an anion gap metabolic Electrolytes: hypo/hyper/normokalemia, hyponatremia Arterial or venous blood gas can be used (Savage 2011) Urinalysis Glucosuria Ketonur Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

CE credit is no longer available for this article. Expired July 2005 Originally posted April 2004 VERONICA CRUMP, RN, BSN VERONICA CRUMP is a nurse on the surgical unit of Morristown Memorial Hospital in Morristown, N.J. She's also a subacute care nurse in the hospital's rehabilitation division. KEY WORDS: hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS), diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hepatic glucose production, proteolysis, hepatic gluconeogenesis, ketone bodies, metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, hypokalemia When a patient presents with markedly high blood glucose levels, the consequences can be fatal. Here's how to get your patient through the crisis. Edith Schafer, age 71, has just been admitted to your ICU with pneumonia, which she developed at home. She has a history of Type 2 diabetes. In addition to a temperature of 102° F (38.9° C), she has rapid, shallow breathing and dry, flushed skin. Her blood pressure is 96/70 mm Hg, and she's so lethargic that she's unable to keep her eyes open. Her lab results show a serum glucose level of 900 mg/dL. In addition to the pneumonia, Mrs. Schafer is suffering from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS). Severe hyperglycemia is a complication of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It can indicate HHS or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), another life-threatening condition. HHS tends to occur in patients with Type 2 diabetes, like Mrs. Schafer, while Type 1 diabetics are more likely to develop DKA. However, DKA can occur in Type 2 diabetes as well.1 HHS and DKA can be set off by infection, stress, missed medication, and other causes. In Mrs. Schafer's case, the trigger was pneumonia, a common cause of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes. No matter what the cause, though, a case of HHS or DKA can turn deadly if not caught in time. The m Continue reading >>

Hypokalemia And Hyperkalemia

Hypokalemia And Hyperkalemia

Sort Adrenal causes of hyperkalemia? Adrenal gland is important in secreting hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone. Aldosterone causes the kidneys to retain sodium and fluid while excreting potassium in the urine. Therefore diseases of the adrenal gland, such as Addison's disease, that lead to decreased aldosterone secretion can decrease kidney excretion of potassium, resulting in body retention of potassium, and hence hyperkalemia. How trauma leads to hyperkalemia Another cause of hyperkalemia is tissue destruction, dying cells release potassium into the blood circulation. Examples of tissue destruction causing hyperkalemia include: trauma, burns, surgery, hemolysis (disintegration of red blood cells), massive lysis of tumor cells, and rhabdomyolysis (a condition involving destruction of muscle cells that is sometimes associated with muscle injury, alcoholism, or drug abuse). What is role of potassium binders (Sodium polystyrene suffocate: SPS) SPS exchanges sodium for potassium and binds it in the gut, primarily in the large intestine, decreasing the total body potassium level by approximately 0.5-1 mEq/L. Multiple doses are usually necessary. Onset of action ranges from 2 to 24 hours after oral administration and is even longer after rectal administration. The duration of action is 4-6 hours. Do not use SPS as a first-line therapy for severe life-threatening hyperkalemia; use it in the second stage of therapy. Continue reading >>

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complicated condition which can be caused if you are unable to effectively treat and manage your diabetes. In this condition, ketones are accumulated in the blood which can adversely affect your health. It can be a fatal condition and may cause a lot of complications. One such complication in diabetic ketoacidosis is the onset of hyperkalemia or the high levels of potassium in the blood. In this article, we shall try to understand as to why hyperkalemia is caused in diabetic ketoacidosis? So, read on “Why is There Hyperkalemia in Diabetic Ketoacidosis?” What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperkalemia? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication that is faced by many patients suffering from diabetes. In this condition, excess blood acids called ketones are produced by the body. The above condition should not be taken lightly and should be immediately treated as the same can cause diabetic coma, and eventually the death of the patient. Hyperkalemia refers to abnormally high levels of potassium in the blood of an individual. For a healthy individual, the level of potassium is around 3.5 to 5 milliequivalents per liter. If you have potassium levels higher than that, that is somewhere in between 5.1 to 6 milliequivalents per liter, then you have a mild level of hyperkalemia. Similarly, if the level of potassium in your blood is somewhere between 6.1 to 7 milliequivalents per liter, you have moderate hyperkalemia. Anything above that, you may be suffering from what is known as severe hyperkalemia. Relation Between Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperkalemia There appears to be a strong relationship between hyperkalemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. In the paragraph that follows, we shall try to analyze and understand the same: If you have diabetes an Continue reading >>

Potassium Balance In Acid-base Disorders

Potassium Balance In Acid-base Disorders

INTRODUCTION There are important interactions between potassium and acid-base balance that involve both transcellular cation exchanges and alterations in renal function [1]. These changes are most pronounced with metabolic acidosis but can also occur with metabolic alkalosis and, to a lesser degree, respiratory acid-base disorders. INTERNAL POTASSIUM BALANCE Acid-base disturbances cause potassium to shift into and out of cells, a phenomenon called "internal potassium balance" [2]. An often-quoted study found that the plasma potassium concentration will rise by 0.6 mEq/L for every 0.1 unit reduction of the extracellular pH [3]. However, this estimate was based upon only five patients with a variety of disturbances, and the range was very broad (0.2 to 1.7 mEq/L). This variability in the rise or fall of the plasma potassium in response to changes in extracellular pH was confirmed in subsequent studies [2,4]. Metabolic acidosis — In metabolic acidosis, more than one-half of the excess hydrogen ions are buffered in the cells. In this setting, electroneutrality is maintained in part by the movement of intracellular potassium into the extracellular fluid (figure 1). Thus, metabolic acidosis results in a plasma potassium concentration that is elevated in relation to total body stores. The net effect in some cases is overt hyperkalemia; in other patients who are potassium depleted due to urinary or gastrointestinal losses, the plasma potassium concentration is normal or even reduced [5,6]. There is still a relative increase in the plasma potassium concentration, however, as evidenced by a further fall in the plasma potassium concentration if the acidemia is corrected. A fall in pH is much less likely to raise the plasma potassium concentration in patients with lactic acidosis Continue reading >>

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